Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Fuel Strikes This Weekend, Drivers Advised To Fill Up


Recommended Posts

In a national paper today (sorry I forget which) it was suggested that our great and glorious prime minister asked us not to panic on purpose. By getting everyone topped early, it allowed garages to have time to restock before the strike starts.

If I find the link I will post is here.

Edit: Linky

Second edit: Financial Times linky

Say what you like about this Government and their legions of PR droids, they do have a good understanding of the psychology of the mob.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 107
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Guest X-QUORK
You keep posting this exact same rhyne on EVERY fuel strike thread.

Play a different record you Gov't troll.

Oh boo hoo, is it getting to you dearie?

Pour yourself a nice cup of tea and calm down.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Fuel strikes: Gordon Brown urges motorists not to panic buy

They were joined by Gordon Brown as the Prime Minister sought to head off a repetition of the stampede to the pumps which accompanied the strike at the Grangemouth refinery in April.

The plea for motorists to keep calm came ahead of this weekend's four day walkout by 641 drivers who work for Shell's suppliers, Hoyer UK and Suckling Transport.

"The most responsible thing the public can do is to continue to buy as normal," Mr Brown's spokesman said.

The article I read said Don't buy any more than you need.

Now I don't know about you guys but I'm not in the habit of buying stuff I don't need. After driving past the same queues at my local station 20 times this week to get a gallon of fuel for my lawnmower I thought I might just as well top the car up. Sorry Mr Brown, we don't all have the use of a helicopter to get us around the country. Maybe if he had to cut his own grass or queue to put petrol in a car he might realise that putting 1 litre of fuel in my car to get me home and queuing for 30 minutes the next morning to put another litre in to get me to work is not really on. Some of us have to try to keep the country running and bring in some revenue to be wasted on cheap advertising gimmicks like sending a Prime Minister to America to appear on tv and tell the world he feels good saving so many lives by buying mosquito nets for ppl that no doubt can't see how great he is because they don't have a tv. So who was that aimed at Mr Brown?

Link to post
Share on other sites
You're very wrong there actually, the Army has loads of Hazmat qualified drivers who regularly drive tankers of fuel around...how do you think military vehicles and aircraft are powered, solar?

Ive worked with a few ex army types, i wouldnt let most of them loose in a milk float. :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just working out on the back of a fag packet and google

400,000 liters per month per site according to forecourt monthly June 2007

14,000 liters per day normally and was 60% higher in last fuel blockades.

100,000 liters of wet stock capacity per forecourt, enough for 4 days of panic buying assuming they top up 6am Friday, have been topping up every day. About 20,000 liters per tanker

So nothing should happen overall, some sites might run out early or have a bit left over. But if everyone fills up it should balance out even better by panicing early.

Yay I was right about something

The UK Petrol Industry Association (UKPIA), which represents oil refiners, said that stocks at forecourts were at normal levels and most garages would have around four days of supplies.

UKPIA estimated that demand for fuel was 30% higher than average for the time of year but said the industry could cope with the strike.

The Petrol Retailers' Association (PRA) said there were "significant sales increases" in some areas, with sales up 15% to 20%.

Overall stations are "well placed" for stocks, though some Shell stations said they would "have critical stock positions during the weekend", the PRA said.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7452033.stm

Page last updated at 16:53 GMT, Friday, 13 June 2008 17:53 UK

Link to post
Share on other sites
Fuel Strikes This Weekend, Drivers Advised To Fill Up

Saw it all today at the local Tesco filling station, the pathetic putting their fivers and tenners in their tanks, myself don`t give a toss as I have enough fuel to last 3 months.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I did my 300 mile trip yersterday.

I drove at 60mph in Mrs. TFH's Corsa and returned about 50-55mpg, which isn't bad for a W reg I don't think. Felt a bit odd though, hanging with the lorries!

I topped up no bother (put in 15L at each end), no queues or anything.

As the Jubbly Line is down today I need to drive to SE18 and back, using about a gallon or 1/9th of the tank up.

So, all in all, my steadfast intent to panic in the face of no adversity whatsoever means we are reasonably shored up for this strike.

I hear it is to be repeated next weekend. That one might bugger me as I have a much longer journey planned in my 22mpg guzzler, which although is brimmed up with 85L of super, won't get as far as the Corsa would with 45L in it. I also think the next strike is being planned because of the lack of effect of this one. They clearly want to bring some further disruption to make their point, so in a way it would have been less painful for the Ministry of Propaganda to have not said anything so we didn't all top up, got into a national pickle and got it sorted this week.

A protracted dispute could cause a lot of bother, but presumably the drivers can't afford not to be paid for too long and the strikes will stop.

I have no judgement on their pay and what is right. All our salaries are being devalued by inflation or whatever at about 10-15% per year I reckon.

TFH

PS Quick calculations: Corsa gets about 480 miles per tank for 45L; BMW gets 410 miles per tank for 85L. I gotta sell that Beamer!!!

Edited by Tin Foil Hat
Link to post
Share on other sites

The UK Petrol Industry Association (UKPIA), which represents oil refiners, said that stocks at forecourts were at normal levels and most garages would have around four days of supplies.

That'll be why there appears to be no diesel around here at any garages and some are out of petrol too. I also hear that Avonmouth were unaffected by strikes.

Maybe it will all get topped up overnight. then again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

People, this latest strike and the panic-buying it is causing is just one of the many clues being thrown up by current affairs that our way of life is over; food prices, pay strikes, fuel prices, bursting bubbles - it is all coming from the same source: our wasteful way of life is beginning to come up against some physical realities.

Get used to it: expect to see more food-price inflation, more striking, soon a nice bit of rioting, more petrol price hikes, widespread unemployment, rolling blackouts, a collapse in living standards, and on top of all this the mother of all housing crashes.

Society is now composed of two types of people: the ignorant who think that increasing standards of living year-on-year like our parents enjoyed since the war are inevitable, and the clued-up who realise that we are now entering a 'long emergency' where oil/energy consumption per head is now going to decline year-on-year, and with it our cheap flights, cheap holidays, cheap imported tat, and cheap food. The first type of person is going to find it extremely difficult psychologically to come to terms with the end of the dream in which they have been living.

Better get used to it and start planning.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Better get used to it and start planning.

Did exactly that today. Picked up a 2nd hand push bike with big wheels (by big I mean 700c size instead of mountain bike size) for 90 quid fully serviced and renewed by a local bike shop.

Test run to Tesco just now - whereas on my mountain bike, being a fat knacker, I got very sweaty and uncomfortable with the smaller wheels, even with road tyres on. On this bike, I was slightly less knackered due to the road bike wheels and I have demonstrated I can do it without too much physical crisis.

No fuel needed so that's getting about town sorted for the foreseeable. Tube for work (until this starts affecting leccy supplies I suppose) and now I just need to sell my guzzler and then concentrate on some vegetable growing.

I should have cycled past the other Shell garage to see what state they were in; I'll do it tomorrow morning. I don't suppose they will be getting an overnight fill!

TFH

Edited by Tin Foil Hat
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was talking to a pall today knows a bit about Petrol and Oil production/industry he said the best way to protest about fuel costs is not to buy fuel. He said if a lot of people didnt buy for a week they would be knackered not because of lost revenue but because the whole system is based on producing some much product and getting it delivered straight away becasue of the volume of it. If everyone stopped buying they would end up with loads of stock with no where to store it

Link to post
Share on other sites
The thing is the problem of capacity is compounded, inner cities have closed a lot of petrol stations and made way for flats or a tesco express. The capacity for a city to cope with a sudden increase in demand is greatly reduced. Previously, say you would have a choice of 2 stations nearby, but if that is now 1, people all have to queue up at one station. This does not help as car ownership increases.

Bloody good point, some rural areas it must be even more as a proportion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

marko

Get used to it: expect to see more food-price inflation

Coverage of flooding in the US on sky an hour or so ago, Iowa hit badly, once in 500 year event with multiple rivers bursting their banks - 20% of Iowa corn crop destroyed. Soya crop affected too as planting due now.

Link to post
Share on other sites
marko

Get used to it: expect to see more food-price inflation

Coverage of flooding in the US on sky an hour or so ago, Iowa hit badly, once in 500 year event with multiple rivers bursting their banks - 20% of Iowa corn crop destroyed. Soya crop affected too as planting due now.

Wow. Have our McHouse builders been cramming them into Iowa and it's flood plains? :lol:

Must be horrible though in all seriousness.

TFH

Link to post
Share on other sites

Asda in Penryn have run out of Petrol, together with Jet at Treluswell and Esso in Falmouth.

I didn't think they would so quickly. :o

Ps. Anyone want to buy a 2001 1.6 Ford Focus Zetec? :D

Edited by NeilP
Link to post
Share on other sites
People, this latest strike and the panic-buying it is causing is just one of the many clues being thrown up by current affairs that our way of life is over; food prices, pay strikes, fuel prices, bursting bubbles - it is all coming from the same source: our wasteful way of life is beginning to come up against some physical realities.

Get used to it: expect to see more food-price inflation, more striking, soon a nice bit of rioting, more petrol price hikes, widespread unemployment, rolling blackouts, a collapse in living standards, and on top of all this the mother of all housing crashes.

Society is now composed of two types of people: the ignorant who think that increasing standards of living year-on-year like our parents enjoyed since the war are inevitable, and the clued-up who realise that we are now entering a 'long emergency' where oil/energy consumption per head is now going to decline year-on-year, and with it our cheap flights, cheap holidays, cheap imported tat, and cheap food. The first type of person is going to find it extremely difficult psychologically to come to terms with the end of the dream in which they have been living.

Better get used to it and start planning.

I'm inclined to agree there. Thirty or forty years ago we spent about 30% of our income on food compared to around 9% now. If we go back to those days which is looking increasingly likely then that's 21% of our income we won't be spending on houses, for instance. This HPC may well see house prices more than 1/2 in value.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We are now entering a stage in our history where the days of feast have gone, its famine all the way now.

Expertly Engineered Economic mismanagement by our leaders has brought each and every one of us to the point of ruin. Irrespective of whether or not you are in debt, the future is going to be very bleak.

Iran is a done deal hence the 42day detention laws in anticipation of the invasion, the $200 a barrell oil project first mooted at the G8 and the Bilderburg conferences some years ago are in full swing. The peoples of this world are going to see some exceptional circumstances in the future months that will reinforce the view that liberal politics actually allows extremists parties such as New Labour to come in and fill the void.

Edited by laurejon
Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a caller to Talk Sport last night on George Galloway show saying something like the 3 days they are working next week won't be sufficient to restock and resupply the stations.

Anyone else heard about that? I'm supposed to be going to N. Yorks next weekend (from London) and am increasingly thinking that we will be stuffed. The missus is talking about using the trains instead, but it's a long weekend in a little village miles from the trains!

TFH

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.