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Reasons To Be Cheerful? Well, At Least The Sun Shone Yesterday


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Sorry if this has been posted before - had a quick flick through and couldn't see it. Great article. Worth having a look at the comments, too.

Reasons to be cheerful? Well, at least the sun shone yesterday

Newspapers are often accused of being wilfully alarmist in order to boost circulation. Destruction and disaster are more appealing to readers than jolly tales about jumble sales, so we churn out the former and spike the latter. That, at least, is the allegation.

For the defence, the argument is clear. With what is going on today, there is no need to manufacture gloom. The real news is bad and getting worse.

After a decade of New Labour, the United Kingdom feels increasingly dysfunctional, a country whose economic engine has been filled with bootleg fuel - excessive personal debt, uncontrolled immigration, government profligacy - and is now blowing thick smoke.

Essential parts of the machinery are broken. Gordon Brown and his team of unqualified mechanics would prefer that we turn up the radio to drown out the grinding noise, but it's too late - the damage has been done.

Having promised us Rolls-Royce services, they have delivered Del Boy's three-wheeler. A golden legacy is ending up on the scrapheap.

For someone who likes the world to know how clever he is, the Prime Minister has made a spectacular botch of his maths exams. Brown's command of big numbers - projected arrivals from overseas, the gold price, Budget deficits - is hopeless, D-minus. None of his sums adds up.

The price of the average house fell by 2.4 per cent last month, no bad thing unless you (along with many others) have borrowed beyond the limit of prudence in order to buy one. Inflation is a threat, so the Bank of England is in a box on interest rates. Mortgage costs are rising, as nervous banks re-price risk. Higher taxes, energy costs and food bills are further squeezing consumers.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development says Britain is uniquely vulnerable to the direst financial conditions since the early 1990s, largely because of Brown's "excessively loose fiscal policy". Having emptied the piggy bank, with far too little to show for it, the Prime Minister and his glove-puppet next door have no room to cut taxes and prevent sharp decline. Growth is set to halve; unemployment is heading for a nine-year high.

Aside from money matters, Britain's social cohesion is crumbling. The creed of multiculturalism, which the Government and its BBC cheerleaders did so much to promote, has created not a rainbow nation, but groups of disconnected and disaffected racial and religious minorities, some of whom detest the very thing that Brown now urges the nation to celebrate. The glue that binds us - real Britishness - has been corroded by a bunch of vote-hungry desperados who don't even understand it.

If Brown is so keen on Britishness, why did he renege on a manifesto promise for a referendum on a new European Union constitution? Why did he give away another chunk of our sovereignty at a sordid deal in Lisbon? Why did he support a devolutionary settlement for Scotland that created a democratic deficit in England, setting one part of the Union against another? These betrayals cannot be masked by a silly day of flag waving.

Forget for a moment the ugliness of the BNP; many decent British people feel deeply disturbed by the upheaval to their local areas brought by unfettered immigration. Not unreasonably, they liked their towns as they were. They didn't want them filled with people who neither speak their language nor share their values. They did not vote for this, yet are uneasy about speaking out lest the forces of political correctness charge them with "racism".

It is an uncomfortable irony that it takes two prominent immigrants, both senior churchmen - Michael Nazir-Ali, the Bishop of Rochester, and John Sentamu, the Archbishop of York - to identify the hurt we have inflicted on ourselves by an over-indulgence of those who are hostile to our Christian-based traditions. Perhaps it's because they come from abroad (Dr Nazir-Ali was born in Pakistan, Dr Sentamu in Uganda) that they feel confident to tackle issues that our domestic leaders prefer to avoid.

While Rowan Williams, the Archbishop of Canterbury, is chewing over the benefits of sharia, Dr Sentamu has launched a blistering attack on Labour's moral vacuity, condemning its support for "entitlements" and an "abused form of equality", while allowing responsibility to fall "off the radar".

Remember Tony Blair's speech about being "tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime"? Another broken promise. Our jails are full to bursting, yet there is an epidemic of fatal stabbings. Just as the cost of living is becoming painfully more expensive, life in the sink estates has never been cheaper.

No wonder thousands of prisoners every year reject the chance of early release. It's safer in Wandsworth prison than on Wandsworth Common.

Priorities are warped to fit Labour's definition of "fairness", which all too frequently means bribes for those it hopes will keep the party in power. Private pensions are raided to help fund a heavily defrauded tax credit system. People who save are punished to reward those who don't.

Our soldiers are asked to mop up Blair's mess in the Middle East, yet they are paid, as General Sir Richard Dannatt points out, less than a traffic warden. Squaddies are being blown up in far off hell-holes for about one third of the salary of an Equality and Diversity Officer (circa £35,000).

State education, into which Labour has tipped hundreds of billions of additional funding, has failed wretchedly to respond to taxpayers' largesse. Ministers boast of soaring standards, but the public is not fooled.

More parents than ever before would send their children to private schools if they could afford the fees. According to an Ipsos MORI poll, 57 per cent would consider taking their offspring out of state schools, up from 48 per cent in 2004.

Labour's response has been to persecute our best universities, threatening them with the cane of a cut in resources if they don't admit more state-educated students. About £3 billion has been spent in England alone trying to "widen participation", but the cash has largely been squandered.

Ten of Britain's top universities - Oxbridge, St Andrews, Durham, Imperial, Bristol, LSE, UCL, Nottingham and Edinburgh - have a state-school intake of less than 70 per cent, whereas on a simple pro-rata basis it should be 93 per cent.

The reason has little to do with snobbery or elitism, but a commendable desire by these world-class institutions to maintain their reputations as centres of excellence. Their admissions' tutors would love to accept more pupils from unfashionable comprehensives, but too few get the grades.

By contrast, the drop-out rates at some new universities (much favoured by Labour's class-warrior propagandists), where the bar to entry is barely off the ground, are up to 50 per cent - a criminal waste of time and talent.

Enough bad news? Ok, let's talk about the weather.

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I think one day we shall have to examine the phenomenon of British self-hatred. Are we not the unhappiest country in the world? It is easy to make a political point here (ie. it is because of [whoever] [whatever party]) but I think it might go a bit deeper because Americans could certainly complain about their politicians and their stupid ideas, as could the French or the Italians or the Germans or anybody else for that matter. Yet none come even close to being a self-hating as the British. We are at least No.1 in something then! When I travel around I'm always struck by how positive people are and even if they aren't tub-thumping jingoists they don't seem to hold their nations and their countrymen in utter contempt as the Brit seems to.

So why are we like this?

Loss of Empire? Suez? The Great War and the lost generation perhaps?

And more importantly, how can we fix it? I'm really, really tired of it.

I'd emigrate if I thought the grass was significantly greener elsewhere but that is a different issue.

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I'd emigrate if I thought the grass was significantly greener elsewhere but that is a different issue.

Perhaps our issues are more than just monetary but social too. The breakdown of social cohesion might make people more insecure leading them to bitch about things but not be confident enough to try and change things in their own country or move abroad. Many people say the same as you that things are just as bad everywhere but it's really not the case, I've heard countless stories of people being happier abroad.

I think it's just a case of only bad news being heard about moving because people are more likely to complain about something than say how great things are- as being happy is a normal and good thing so people feel like there is nothing to say about it.

For example someone might move abroad and lead a happy life but just say to their friends back in the UK that everything is ok and their friends won't think the news is that important but if they were told it was awful, the friends might consider telling their other friends that such-and-such country is an awful place to go, bla bla bad experience.

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I think one day we shall have to examine the phenomenon of British self-hatred.

I don't believe that this article has anything to do with self-hatred on the part of the British people. Rather, it is a very reasonable assessment of current affairs.

Too many people, for too long, have been led down the "everything-in-the-garden-is-rosy" pathway spun by NULab, and this article reminds us that there is only a limited time that rose-tinted glasses can fool people.

You can fool all of the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time. We are at that point in politics where I believe all of the people believe that they have been fooled for long enough. There is a tide-change before us. As Shakespeare observed:

“There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat. And we must take the current when it serves, or lose our ventures.”

The truth will ALWAYS out, and we're in for a big dose of it, imo. Hiding one's head, ostrich-like, in the sand, will not make unpleasant realities disappear.

"British self-hatred" is as much Orwellian Newspeak expression as "public sector investment." The British do not "hate themselves" as you would suggest. What they are doing is waking up from a deep sleep and begininng to assert themselves and recognise a dud for a dud.

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The creed of multiculturalism, which the Government and its BBC cheerleaders did so much to promote, has created not a rainbow nation, but groups of disconnected and disaffected racial and religious minorities, some of whom detest the very thing that Brown now urges the nation to celebrate. The glue that binds us - real Britishness - has been corroded by a bunch of vote-hungry desperados who don't even understand it

Dr Sentamu has launched a blistering attack on Labour's moral vacuity, condemning its support for "entitlements" and an "abused form of equality", while allowing responsibility to fall "off the radar".

.

America is trying a different path.

Instead of jobs for the unemployables,

America has found an inspiring leader, with a heart for change

In leading, he is inventing a new (and workable) definition of what it is to be America.

Meantime in the UK:

The former Stealth Chancellor, is now the Stealth Prime Minister, and people

are seeing through his trickery

== == ==

Mods, perhaps you should move this thread to HPC's ECONOMICS section,

so I will be more comfortable posting on it. That is where many of the most interesting

threads on HPC seem to have landed

while hes not ramping man made global warming he is promoting

Barak "ive just been to bilderberg this weekend" obama

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

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America has found an inspiring leader, with a heart for change

In leading, he is inventing a new (and workable) definition of what it is to be America.

What change exactly? He says *change* alot without explaining what it is?

What definition of being america is he inventing?

He has just said "change,change,change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

"

and every dimwit and his dr bubb has bought it.

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What change exactly? He says *change* alot without explaining what it is?

What definition of being america is he inventing?

He has just said "change,change,change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

"

and every dimwit and his dr bubb has bought it.

It worked for Clinton when he campaigned against Bush Senior. James Carville put a sign up in the Clinton HQ which said:

1. Change vs. more of the same

2. The economy, stupid

3. Don't forget health care.

Compared to Bush Jr, Obama is Einstein. And with the American economy hanging in the balance, "change" is very much on the agenda, methinks.

Reasons to be Cheerful - 1, 2, 3 ;)

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Squaddies are being blown up in far off hell-holes for about one third of the salary of an Equality and Diversity Officer (circa £35,000).

IIRC, the UK is not the only country involved in this diversion. ;)

Obama is facing a very very difficult presidency (which he'll get barring Israel doing something that really spikes oil before November). He needs to take a nation -- a nation, not a Senate or a Congress -- that rarely looks beyond its borders and turn it into one that not only that recognizes competition from the east but learns to respect it sufficiently to invite much more of it to the US.

It's a huge challenge. I wish him well.

I'm looking for his first step to be signing Hilary Clinton as his running mate (days) and stay all over this "time for change" message. By November, I suspect, "time for change" will sound even better than it already does for a lot of Americans.

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The creed of multiculturalism, which the Government and its BBC cheerleaders did so much to promote, has created not a rainbow nation, but groups of disconnected and disaffected racial and religious minorities, some of whom detest the very thing that Brown now urges the nation to celebrate. The glue that binds us - real Britishness - has been corroded by a bunch of vote-hungry desperados who don't even understand it

Dr Sentamu has launched a blistering attack on Labour's moral vacuity, condemning its support for "entitlements" and an "abused form of equality", while allowing responsibility to fall "off the radar".

.

America is trying a different path.

Instead of jobs for the unemployables,

America has found an inspiring leader, with a heart for change

In leading, he is inventing a new (and workable) definition of what it is to be America.

Meantime in the UK:

The former Stealth Chancellor, is now the Stealth Prime Minister, and people

are seeing through his trickery

== == ==

Mods, perhaps you should move this thread to HPC's ECONOMICS section,

so I will be more comfortable posting on it. That is where many of the most interesting

threads on HPC seem to have landed

I'm not so sure that I have as much confidence in Barak Obama as you appear to have. ONly time will tell.

What I do agree with is that we have a lame duck Prime Minister who has had his day. I have yet to be convinced that Cameron will be much better. I'd prefer to hear an Opposition leader talking about CUTTING government spending, not matching it.

Oh, and if this thread disappears to Off-topic, or Economics, then I hope, as you say, we can continue the discussion there.

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It worked for Clinton when he campaigned against Bush Senior. James Carville put a sign up in the Clinton HQ which said:

1. Change vs. more of the same

2. The economy, stupid

3. Don't forget health care.

Compared to Bush Jr, Obama is Einstein. And with the American economy hanging in the balance, "change" is very much on the agenda, methinks.

Reasons to be Cheerful - 1, 2, 3 ;)

obama is more of the same...with a *cooler* look.

Ron Paul is change. The constitution is change.

The US and the EU are looking more and more like the soviet union day by day.

The people need to wake up to their plight.

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The creed of multiculturalism, which the Government and its BBC cheerleaders did so much to promote, has created not a rainbow nation, but groups of disconnected and disaffected racial and religious minorities, some of whom detest the very thing that Brown now urges the nation to celebrate. The glue that binds us - real Britishness - has been corroded by a bunch of vote-hungry desperados who don't even understand it

.

I have my doubts about this. Britain has had endless waves of immigration. The reaction against it has been pretty much the same for the last 1000 years or so. I don’t really think things have changed that much. We are still here and still complaining about it. I was talking my wee girl for a walk round the cemetery in the town. A significant percentage of the names were of Eastern European origin. Immigration has both benefits and costs and I think has very little to do with our present predicament.

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  • 9 months later...
I think one day we shall have to examine the phenomenon of British self-hatred. Are we not the unhappiest country in the world? It is easy to make a political point here (ie. it is because of [whoever] [whatever party]) but I think it might go a bit deeper because Americans could certainly complain about their politicians and their stupid ideas, as could the French or the Italians or the Germans or anybody else for that matter. Yet none come even close to being a self-hating as the British. We are at least No.1 in something then! When I travel around I'm always struck by how positive people are and even if they aren't tub-thumping jingoists they don't seem to hold their nations and their countrymen in utter contempt as the Brit seems to.

So why are we like this?

Loss of Empire? Suez? The Great War and the lost generation perhaps?

And more importantly, how can we fix it? I'm really, really tired of it.

I'd emigrate if I thought the grass was significantly greener elsewhere but that is a different issue.

I view lots of US EA sites and their optimism and up beat chat about recovery is just unrealistic. The British are able to criticise and even hate themselves but we can also laugh at ourselves which is rare and something to be cherished.

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I view lots of US EA sites and their optimism and up beat chat about recovery is just unrealistic. The British are able to criticise and even hate themselves but we can also laugh at ourselves which is rare and something to be cherished.

love the pubs for sale site!!!!

buy one while you still can. New Labour clearly want to destroy our pub supply.

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Sorry if this has been posted before - had a quick flick through and couldn't see it. Great article. Worth having a look at the comments, too.

Reasons to be cheerful? Well, at least the sun shone yesterday

............/

Enough bad news? Ok, let's talk about the weather.[/i]

Oh I do think Randall says it all so well. Better than others do anyway.

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What change exactly? He says *change* alot without explaining what it is?

He has just said "change,change,change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

change,

and every dimwit and his dr bubb has bought it.

Precisely.

He is doing just what Bush said he was going to do.

Pump money into the economy.

Some people just cant distinguish between action and words.

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I believe there is a culture of self hatred among the British (mainly the English). It started with a vague sense of unease and embarrassment when this tiny island ruled one quarter of the earth; a feeling of not wanting to show off. International socialists and nihilists then did all they could to turn it into a form of self loathing in order to better their own causes.

It's not a new phenomenon - Orwell writes about 'the highbrows with their automatic snigger at any British institution' and those that would 'rather be caught stealing from a poor-box than standing for God Save the King'.

In a mild and humorous form, it is a good thing; far better than the relentlessly cheerful, whooping patriotism of some Americans. But in its more extreme, nihilstic form it's as bad as any tub-thumping BNP nonsense.

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I believe there is a culture of self hatred among the British (mainly the English). It started with a vague sense of unease and embarrassment when this tiny island ruled one quarter of the earth; a feeling of not wanting to show off. International socialists and nihilists then did all they could to turn it into a form of self loathing in order to better their own causes.

It's not a new phenomenon - Orwell writes about 'the highbrows with their automatic snigger at any British institution' and those that would 'rather be caught stealing from a poor-box than standing for God Save the King'.

In a mild and humorous form, it is a good thing; far better than the relentlessly cheerful, whooping patriotism of some Americans. But in its more extreme, nihilstic form it's as bad as any tub-thumping BNP nonsense.

:unsure:

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I have my doubts about this. Britain has had endless waves of immigration. The reaction against it has been pretty much the same for the last 1000 years or so. I don’t really think things have changed that much. We are still here and still complaining about it. I was talking my wee girl for a walk round the cemetery in the town. A significant percentage of the names were of Eastern European origin. Immigration has both benefits and costs and I think has very little to do with our present predicament.

nonsense

britain has not had mass migration over 1000 years. it has had small migration from specific groups but it did not change the make up of the country. you have been sold the pc lie. as stalin said a lie told enough times becomes the truth.

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