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Just A Little Bit Of History Repeating

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"In this year before Christmas 1124 the king Henry sent from Normandy to England and commanded that all the moneyers who were in England should be deprived of their limbs, that was the right hand of each of them and their stones below; that was because the man who had a pound could not buy a penn'orth at a market. And the bishop Robert of Salisbury sent all over England and commanded them all that they should come to Winchester at Christmas. Then when they came there they were seized one by one, and each deprived of the right hand and the stones below. All this was done inside of the twelve nights; (Christmas to 12th Night) and it was all very proper because they had done for all the land with their great fraud, (the word used here can also mean adulteration or debasement, latterly bad money) which they all paid for.

Today this seems a remarkably gruesome act, however such punishments were not uncommon in early Norman England. In the coins themselves we find a clue as to the reasoning behind this event. Coins of Medieval Europe, by P. Grierson states of the coinage of Henry I "the moneyers now begin to bear Norman names such as William and Richard…" suggesting that control of thee currency was being transferred, at least in some cases to Norman families. We should remember that moneying, like most other trades was inherited. This act would put all of the Anglo-Saxon moneying families out of the business, as a moneyer needs both hands to strike coins, and none of those unfortunate men would be having any sons to pass their trade on to. As to the allegation that the money had been debased, P. Grierson goes on to write "…while the design is often good, the quality of striking is much inferior to that of the two Williams. Chemical analyses of surviving specimens do not bear out the general belief of the time that the coins were badly debased." It may well be that the king, off across the water, believed the coinage had been debased, and in any case he must have felt that he needed to be seen to be doing something to restore faith in the currency if he were to rule England.

http://www.billdawsonmetalsmith.com/write2.html

just a thought.....

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It may well be that the king, off across the water, believed the coinage had been debased, and in any case he must have felt that he needed to be seen to be doing something to restore faith in the currency if he were to rule England.

http://www.billdawsonmetalsmith.com/write2.html

just a thought.....

History repeats itself endlessly - but in unexpected and variable ways....

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"....and their stones below" "and none of those unfortunate men would be having any sons to pass their trade on to."

Er.... does that mean their knacks? :blink:

OMG, and I thought these times were barbaric! :(

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"....and their stones below" "and none of those unfortunate men would be having any sons to pass their trade on to."

Er.... does that mean their knacks? :blink:

Seems fair enough to me :lol:

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  • 294 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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