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Best Orgs To Shop A Mortgage Fraudster To

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I expect to have information shortly which will show extensive signs of a large mortgage fraud for a group of properties.

Being a law-abiding sort of chap I would want this information to reach the correct authorities.

Which organisations would you expect would be the best people to contact?

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Depends which person the evidence "fingers".

Obviously the police, if there has been fraud, but also;

The Law Society, if the solicitor is implicated,

The FSA, if the lender is implicated,

The lender, if the borrower is implicated,

Anyone think of any others?

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Ah, the self-policing sheeple are at work again. Lovely stuff.

Twenty years ago, it was unthinkable to "shop" people unless it was a physical offence against another person like assault, rape, murder, etc. I miss the old country.

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Guest X-QUORK
Ah, the self-policing sheeple are at work again. Lovely stuff.

Twenty years ago, it was unthinkable to "shop" people unless it was a physical offence against another person like assault, rape, murder, etc. I miss the old country.

I suppose you believe all that guff about the Krays never stealing from their own, honesty amongst theives and all that.

Time to take those rose tinted specs off.

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I would definately go to the police. If the police are informed it makes it impossible for other bodies to sweep the information under the carpet and pretend it doesnt exist, which im sure happens a lot..

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Ah, the self-policing sheeple are at work again. Lovely stuff.

Twenty years ago, it was unthinkable to "shop" people unless it was a physical offence against another person like assault, rape, murder, etc. I miss the old country.

Havent you heard? informing the authorities regarding other citizens financial irregularities is the new frisbee or hula-hoop....have you shopped someone today? :P

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Ah, the self-policing sheeple are at work again. Lovely stuff.

Twenty years ago, it was unthinkable to "shop" people unless it was a physical offence against another person like assault, rape, murder, etc. I miss the old country.

:rolleyes:

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The Police?

They probably wouldn't be interested in the general case. It's possible the City of London police might take a look if it involved a firm with offices in the City, but otherwise your best bet is the FSA.

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Ah, the self-policing sheeple are at work again. Lovely stuff.

Twenty years ago, it was unthinkable to "shop" people unless it was a physical offence against another person like assault, rape, murder, etc. I miss the old country.

What a bizarre opinion.

Are you also the sort of person who says "good luck to them" when a colleague throws a sickie and you have to work harder to cover their workload?

Mortgage fraud costs me money, which is why I'm in favour of "shopping" the guilty.

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Ah, the self-policing sheeple are at work again. Lovely stuff.

Twenty years ago, it was unthinkable to "shop" people unless it was a physical offence against another person like assault, rape, murder, etc. I miss the old country.

Twently years ago you could house your family and buy a home for 3.5 times your salary because mortgage fraud wasnt rampant.

Edited by King Stromba

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I would definately go to the police. If the police are informed it makes it impossible for other bodies to sweep the information under the carpet and pretend it doesnt exist, which im sure happens a lot..

It's a nice theory and I genuinely wish you were right. However, the police have largely opted out of looking at financial crime unless it's for very large amounts of money. For example, if you call the police to tell them your credit card has been stolen - happened to me recently - they'll just tell you to go to your card provider who won't even ask for a crime number anymore.

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It's a nice theory and I genuinely wish you were right. However, the police have largely opted out of looking at financial crime unless it's for very large amounts of money. For example, if you call the police to tell them your credit card has been stolen - happened to me recently - they'll just tell you to go to your card provider who won't even ask for a crime number anymore.

Wow, what a great police force we have. :blink:

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What a bizarre opinion.

Are you also the sort of person who says "good luck to them" when a colleague throws a sickie and you have to work harder to cover their workload?

Mortgage fraud costs me money, which is why I'm in favour of "shopping" the guilty.

That's quite a bizarre reply.

Unless you had a specific intention of buying a property implicated in this as-yet entirely unproven "fraud", it has not cost you a penny.

Let the authorities find out for themselves and concentrate on yourself and not pulling other people down.

Twently years ago you could house your family and buy a home for 3.5 times your salary because mortgage fraud wasnt rampant.

Indeed you could. However, the alleged lack of mortgage fraud 20 years ago is not the sole or main reason for the pricing of housing as a multiple of income.

I suppose you believe all that guff about the Krays never stealing from their own, honesty amongst theives and all that.

Time to take those rose tinted specs off.

As I stated in my original post, shopping someone for a direct act of harm against another person was acceptable 20 years ago.

Havent you heard? informing the authorities regarding other citizens financial irregularities is the new frisbee or hula-hoop....have you shopped someone today? :P

It's great, isn't it.

Plus you get all the fun of watching another person's life being devastated.

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That's quite a bizarre reply.

Unless you had a specific intention of buying a property implicated in this as-yet entirely unproven "fraud", it has not cost you a penny.

Let the authorities find out for themselves and concentrate on yourself and not pulling other people down.

Oh come on, think about it for a moment before you post;

- house prices have been inflated, in no small part, due to fraud

- because of inflated house prices, people have got themselves into spiralling debt

- when conditions "normalise" many more people get repossessed and end up relying on the state

- I pay taxes, therefore I am contributing to these people's safety net

Shop the fraudsters. You and I pay for the consequences of their actions.

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Wow, what a great police force we have. :blink:

Yes, if there is any danger of them getting hurt you are hard pushed to get a response. It's easier to sit behind a desk and wait for a roll of film to come in from the real crime element and scourge of the country......... speeding motorists. Never mind that they may be speeding away from an armed robbery or speeding out of Dover with half a dozen illegal's aboard, just give them a fixed penalty and 3 points ......if you can find them. :P

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Pacific State,

I have to agree with you in terms of reporting individuals, but I don't have the same problem about reporting companies/institutions.

Years ago when I was at school it was a matter of honour that we didn't tell on one another - even if it meant the whole class got punished instead of the one guilty person. I've always felt that this entrenched code was a good safeguard against government using us to inform on one another and thus exert total control over the population as in the GDR and other communist and fascist states.

However, a company is a different matter......

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Oh come on, think about it for a moment before you post;

- house prices have been inflated, in no small part, due to fraud

- because of inflated house prices, people have got themselves into spiralling debt

- when conditions "normalise" many more people get repossessed and end up relying on the state

- I pay taxes, therefore I am contributing to these people's safety net

Shop the fraudsters. You and I pay for the consequences of their actions.

I did think about it.

This "fraud" is entirely unproven - it is the hunch of the OP. It is merely people's anger towards the shitty situation of the housing market that makes them want to punish someone for it.

Regarding repossessions, they happen anyway. This is often down to uncontrolled spending on the part of the homeowners (MEWing, credit card debts, etc) rather than the action of the OP's unproven "fraudster".

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I did think about it.

This "fraud" is entirely unproven - it is the hunch of the OP. It is merely people's anger towards the shitty situation of the housing market that makes them want to punish someone for it.

Regarding repossessions, they happen anyway. This is often down to uncontrolled spending on the part of the homeowners (MEWing, credit card debts, etc) rather than the action of the OP's unproven "fraudster".

Now you're being deliberately obtuse. Your first post suggested some issue with "shopping" fraud in general. Now you're saying that your issue is that this specific case is unproven.

Oh, and you reckon that the repo rate would be the same regardless of whether there's been any fraud in the housing market? You're clearly just in an antagonistic mood, because I'm sure you don't believe that.

Edited by Paddles

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Pacific State,

I have to agree with you in terms of reporting individuals, but I don't have the same problem about reporting companies/institutions.

Years ago when I was at school it was a matter of honour that we didn't tell on one another - even if it meant the whole class got punished instead of the one guilty person. I've always felt that this entrenched code was a good safeguard against government using us to inform on one another and thus exert total control over the population as in the GDR and other communist and fascist states.

However, a company is a different matter......

Not running to the state to sort out your grievances or problems is the sign of a society where individuals have respect for each other. Not running to the state because you're pissed off with house prices and want to bring someone down for it is the sign of a society where everyone realises they are in the same boat and concentrates on sorting their own affairs out.

I understand your point about the distinction between a person and a company, but can't agree with it, I'm afraid.

Companies generally do not rat on each other, ime, because the threat of having the authorities breathing down your throat is unbearable. It is the shittiest, crudest and cruelest form of industrial espionage and people's lives (directors, staff members, etc) can be brought down by it.

We pay an exhorbitant amount of tax for the "joy" of having these authorities. Let them work for their money.

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Now you're being deliberately obtuse. Your first post suggested some issue with "shopping" fraud in general. Now you're saying that your issue is that this specific case is unproven.

Oh, and you reckon that the repo rate would be the same regardless of whether there's been any fraud in the housing market? You're clearly just in an antagonistic mood, because I'm sure you don't believe that.

Paddles, I'm not having a pop at you, I promise. I enjoy your posts and point of view.

Despite many many years of fraud in the housing market, so clearly highlighted by eric pebbles, the repo rate is still very very low. This is especially so when you consider the gap between pricing and wages now with the height of repos in the early 90s.

The OP is probably not an investigator. The OP is probably not a policeman, nor a solicitor. The OP's understanding of the law and the background to these supposedly fraudulent deals is probably minimal.

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I suppose you believe all that guff about the Krays never stealing from their own, honesty amongst theives and all that.

Time to take those rose tinted specs off.

Those mortgage fraudsters, gawd bless 'em. They only ever defrauded their own. And they never bumped up the price of houses without shaking your hand first!

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Not running to the state to sort out your grievances or problems is the sign of a society where individuals have respect for each other. Not running to the state because you're pissed off with house prices and want to bring someone down for it is the sign of a society where everyone realises they are in the same boat and concentrates on sorting their own affairs out.

Yeah! Who needs law enforcement? Let's get those paediatricians now! :P

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  • 292 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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