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Teachers Next, Pay Talks?

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/7309619.stm

All this talk of rate cuts, wait till the wage demands kick in here with the public sector staff, i have a feeling rates could be heading up in the next 12 to 18 months? As for the US, if they are willing to cut aggresively, well it works both ways?

Strikes, large pay demands, they always come after cost inflation, and that is where we are at now, low value goods cost inflation, so next stop wage inflation?

http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/news...st=MostReadHome

Edited by Panda

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They were offered 2.5%? lol. They should ask for 10% (which they are) and settle for around 5%. Anything under 5% and you might just as well have given them a pay cut.

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/7309619.stm

All this talk of rate cuts, wait till the wage demands kick in here with the public sector staff, i have a feeling rates could be heading up in the next 12 to 18 months? As for the US, if they are willing to cut aggresively, well it works both ways?

Strikes, large pay demands, they always come after cost inflation, and that is where we are at now, low value goods cost inflation, so next stop wage inflation?

http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/news...st=MostReadHome

Loving the way they use Northern Rock to show that the government can afford it! ROFL!

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Teachers? Nurses? Strike? I mean, like proper?

Not Sunday mornings, and going back when it's made plain that they'll get their jotters and lose the pension "for the sake of the pore ickle kiddies/patients"

Yore avin ay laaaarrrfff!

They'll settle for whatever they're told to. Always do.

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Can't blame em. All the tax increases of the past decade have hit hardest on the lower to middle wage earners. Teachers are squarely in this bracket. Factor in the true inflation for this bracket and anything below 3% is extremely lousy.

Maybe we can get some of the bankers on this forum to donate? :unsure:

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Oh well...if no one else is going to pile in I might as well! Here goes another teacher bashing thread.

Surely if they worked for a whole year then they could earn more?

OK everyone - there is your starting point - discuss.

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Oh well...if no one else is going to pile in I might as well! Here goes another teacher bashing thread.

Surely if they worked for a whole year then they could earn more?

OK everyone - there is your starting point - discuss.

The government knows they'll always blink first and back down.

I don't reckon they get paid enough. But then who does?

I certainly couldn't put up with what they do.

I thought of trying to get into it, in a vague sort of way, in a moment of weakness many, many years ago.

When it was pointed out I couldn't bring my sword into class I thought better of it.

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Guest absolutezero
Oh well...if no one else is going to pile in I might as well! Here goes another teacher bashing thread.

Surely if they worked for a whole year then they could earn more?

OK everyone - there is your starting point - discuss.

Teachers work and get paid for 195 days a year, so yes, technically you are correct.

However this doesn't take into account the amount of unpaid overtime (marking and planning, writing schemes of work etc) they do at home.

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Teachers work and get paid for 195 days a year, so yes, technically you are correct.

However this doesn't take into account the amount of unpaid overtime (marking and planning, writing schemes of work etc) they do at home.

They do this at home because they are able to leave their places of employment early.

p-o-p

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They do this at home because they are able to leave their places of employment early.

p-o-p

Do you know any teachers?

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Do you know any teachers?

Yes. A few in my extended family. Only one is what I would consider to be a vocational teacher. The others have gone into teaching after being less than successful in other careers.

I have met a few teachers at independent boarding schools. They really do seem to earn their money if they are housemaster/mistresses. All waking hours plus a lot of their holidays used up with their charges.

p-o-p

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Yes. A few in my extended family. Only one is what I would consider to be a vocational teacher. The others have gone into teaching after being less than successful in other careers.

I have met a few teachers at independent boarding schools. They really do seem to earn their money if they are housemaster/mistresses. All waking hours plus a lot of their holidays used up with their charges.

p-o-p

That's right - teacher numbers have expanded massively under labour but a heck of a lot of graduates who would have otherwise ended up starting out in 12k admin roles or McRetail have become teachers. With so few graduate jobs that's not to say everyone forced into low-wage employment is a div - most aren't - but certainly many drippy, listless people have ended up as teachers as it's only only way they can think of to attain a reasonable salary.

Also, while teachers can't take all the blame for the general decline of civilisation they've frequently been part of the problem. When teachers complain about the utter breakdown of education where it's considered a victory to keep the kids from standing on the desks for an hour I say, 'If regimental-style discipline is no longer an option, why don't you teach them self-discipline?' Give them a copy of 'Dumbing Us Down' by John Taylor Gatto and ask them if they want to help turn the ship around or just wallow in the being useless ******-ups school often teaches them to be

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This is not about teachers, this is about wage constraints, this is about us all getting poorer, all that concerns me is wages rise, and houses drop in cost, obviously the latter is my preference, but we will see wage inflation, and we will see a rise in interest rates, because these will have to rise to conteract wage settlements. ASAP hopefully.

I just want to see the Dictator's face when he talks about low inflation, because the low inflation he keeps refering to is low wage inflation, he know's we know that he is making us all poorer, but it will not go on forever as the MEW effect has halted now. ;)

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Can't blame em. All the tax increases of the past decade have hit hardest on the lower to middle wage earners. Teachers are squarely in this bracket.

Since when were teacher's "low earners". Even new treachers earn pretty much the national average.

Teachers start on at least £20,000 which is automaticaly incremented every year with very little increase in responsibility. This happens until they reach the top of the scale. In my experience, an average teacher with about 10 years in the job, that's never been promoted and has some kind of extra responsibilty is on at least £30,000 + a generous final salary pension and unheard of job security.

Some teachers are great, conscientious and care about getting it right. Other's are useless and drift along without much effort at all, seemingly not caring if the students all hate them and are achieving very little. The latter kind is prevalent in crap (e.g. inner city) schools. If you're the latter, then working two-thirds of the year for about £30,000 isn't too bad really.

It's the conscientious, hard working, talented teachers that I would feel sorry for.... I say "would", but fortunately the system tends to recognise their abilities and a sucession of swift promotions tends to see them earing £30,000 to £40,000 in no time.

Edited by RightToExistInASpace

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To be fair to them, the wider concern is actually class sizes which were a manifesto pledge by everyone since the year dot. And you may say, why don't they just strike over that then? The answer is of course they aren't allowed to, it would be illegal, hence these things are expressed as "pay and conditions" where the issue becomes "conditions" but then in principle tradable for "pay". The system is designed with this built-in to discredit workers who strike merely over the actions of management without a clear personal interest (so whatever you are really concerned about they can attack you for "greed").

Still, why should teachers get inflation pay-rises when there are the bonuses of City spivs to prop up with taxpayer's money?

Edited by Cogs

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Teachers work and get paid for 195 days a year, so yes, technically you are correct.

However this doesn't take into account the amount of unpaid overtime (marking and planning, writing schemes of work etc) they do at home.

My girlfriend is a teacher and she leaves the house at 7am on the dot every morning and returns at the earliest at 6pm. She will then sit down to do her marking for an hour or so. Then she will sit there for another hour plus doing her planning stopping at anything between 8pm and 10pm. This week being three nights of parents evenings so she did not get in before 8:30pm this week. I have worked out that hour for hour she is on less than me, however in reality her salary is much larger than mine.

They do this at home because they are able to leave their places of employment early.

p-o-p

No, if you think the bell goes at 3:30pm and they all go home you are totally stupid. Marking, sorting out the classroom and then of course all the after school clubs (everyday) that the government and parents insist on the schools doing because parents cannot/will not be allowed to leave work at 3:30pm to look after their own kids so the schools then become glorified play groups with teachers for babysitting.

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My girlfriend is a teacher and she leaves the house at 7am on the dot every morning and returns at the earliest at 6pm. She will then sit down to do her marking for an hour or so. Then she will sit there for another hour plus doing her planning stopping at anything between 8pm and 10pm. This week being three nights of parents evenings so she did not get in before 8:30pm this week. I have worked out that hour for hour she is on less than me, however in reality her salary is much larger than mine.

No, if you think the bell goes at 3:30pm and they all go home you are totally stupid. Marking, sorting out the classroom and then of course all the after school clubs (everyday) that the government and parents insist on the schools doing because parents cannot/will not be allowed to leave work at 3:30pm to look after their own kids so the schools then become glorified play groups with teachers for babysitting.

How long is her commute? I suspect that you will find that there are a number of members on this site who leave home well before 7am and would consider it to be a lucky day to leave their places of employment before 6pm.

I'm with you on marking. Far better to have exams at the end of every term marked by external examiners who give a percentage mark, not a band, so that parents have some idea how their child is doing. Even better, with the position that the child is in the class and area. League tables for each child!

They might improve their credibility by ensuring that these were predominantly outdoors in organised team sports so that the public could see how much they suffer. Poor children must wonder why they have to sit indoors with the lights turned off!

p-o-p

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How long is her commute? I suspect that you will find that there are a number of members on this site who leave home well before 7am and would consider it to be a lucky day to leave their places of employment before 6pm.

p-o-p

And most of them whine endlessly about how this means their multi-million pound bonuses are only what they deserve.

You won't find many doing for it teacher-level wages. Some, but not many.

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I've worked as a frontline teacher for quite a while now and the three people who came in from the "real world" of the private sector, presumably looking for an easy option, all left within 18 months because they couldn't cope with the workload, didn't have the necessary people skills and were incapable of showing the initiative and mental and physical stamina required to be a success in the job. Two of them were particularly uncomfortable with the level of personal accountability that teaching now requires.

It always amuses me (even more now than ever before, when the jawdropping incompetence and greed of the private sector banking industry is open for all to see) how the profession is portrayed by 9-5 office monkeys as an easy ride.

The sniping about teachers' holidays is motivated , of course, by envy.

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And most of them whine endlessly about how this means their multi-million pound bonuses are only what they deserve.

You won't find many doing for it teacher-level wages. Some, but not many.

I would be surprised if the average earnings of the horde that pass through any main London station on a working day exceeds 30K per annum.

p-o-p

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If you think teachers are overpaid and underworked, then why not become a teacher.... unless....

I don't know whether you are/were a teacher but that is very strange logic. Why would someone seek to be overpaid and underworked? I hope that it is not a prevalent characteristic in teachers.

p-o-p

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What this is really about is the unions starting to flex their muscles, now they've got NuLab by the short and danglies. During the first few years of this government, it was handing out inflation-busting pay rises to virtually all public sector employees (and as a university lecturer, I was one of them), and the Labour Party was raising money from non-traditional sources, e.g. big business, the Hindujas, Ecclestone etc. So the unions didn't have much to complain about, which was just as well because their influence within the Labour Party had declined also.

Now things are very different. The cash for peerages affair, a string of other scandals and skyrocketing taxes are driving big business back towards the Tories. The unions are now, once again, Labour's main paymasters, and, being £20m in debt, the party literally can't afford to urinate them off too much. Furthermore, now that Gordon's spending spree is being squeezed by a stonking PSBD, he's having to squeeze public sector pay deals.

So I expect to see much more strike action for inflation-busting pay rises initiated by Labour-affiliated unions in the next few months. The only thing which may temper it is that the unions know full well that a Tory government would be even less sympathetic to their claims than Gordon, and so probably won't push things too far. But they'll push them far enough to achieve a significant improvement on 2.5%, IMHO.

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I don't know whether you are/were a teacher but that is very strange logic. Why would someone seek to be overpaid and underworked? I hope that it is not a prevalent characteristic in teachers.

p-o-p

Perhaps you ought to go on strike for longer hours and less pay.

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  • 297 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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