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Guest muttley

D I Y Landlords Plan To Do Repairs

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Guest muttley

DIY landlords plan to do repairs

Around 54% of people who are aiming to get a buy-to-let property say they would manage it themselves, rather than pay an agent to do it.

More than a third of landlords also said they would fix problems and carry out maintenance themselves, rather than pay a professional to do it.

More belt tightening for the BTL "investors".

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I wonder if even a tenth of amateur BTLers are actually certificated to carry out the various repairs for which you need to be qualified?

It might be time for an awareness campaign to ensure that tenants have work carried out on electrics etc. by those proficient to do so, not simply their landlord turning up with a pair of rubber boots and a screwdriver.

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Which essentially means they won't do it at all.

I suspect that the actual situation is much worse. They are likely to try and fail - further devaluing their "investments" while making them ever less desirable rented homes.

As you leave and move to somewhere upmarket for less rent, remember to send a postcard to their insurer if you discover the unqualified have been 'renovating'. (Evil ;) )

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But BTLers do provide a very good and worthwhile service, what could we do without them? Be forced to buy a property that is over valued and over priced..... :P

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But BTLers do provide a very good and worthwhile service, what could we do without them? Be forced to buy a property that is over valued and over priced..... :P

My first question when I consider somewhere I might rent is this: "What is the outstanding mortgage" - if they admit that there is a mortgage - I move on.

I expect that the leveraged will assume I'm trying to talk down the price - so will want to explain why they can't help.

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My first question when I consider somewhere I might rent is this: "What is the outstanding mortgage" - if they admit that there is a mortgage - I move on.

I expect that the leveraged will assume I'm trying to talk down the price - so will want to explain why they can't help.

Yes, maybe you could get your bank to do a status enquiry/credit check on your potential landlord, after all if they are not under pressure, and the rent is only providing 'pin money' there is a better chance the rent will stay stable and the repairs will be done. ;)

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Yes, maybe you could get your bank to do a status enquiry/credit check on your potential landlord, after all if they are not under pressure, and the rent is only providing 'pin money' there is a better chance the rent will stay stable and the repairs will be done. ;)

Unfortunately, a credit-check requires permission - and, to be honest, since I'd refuse (the fact that the check is made is recorded and is a black mark is my reason) I can't expect a landlord to be more accommodating.

£3 to the land registry, however, will prove if there is an outstanding mortgage.

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Unfortunately, a credit-check requires permission - and, to be honest, since I'd refuse (the fact that the check is made is recorded and is a black mark is my reason) I can't expect a landlord to be more accommodating.

£3 to the land registry, however, will prove if there is an outstanding mortgage.

So it could be said that it is getting to the point when it is not a case of will the rent be paid...more of will the mortgage get paid.

Renter beware.... ;)

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I wonder if even a tenth of amateur BTLers are actually certificated to carry out the various repairs for which you need to be qualified?

It might be time for an awareness campaign to ensure that tenants have work carried out on electrics etc. by those proficient to do so, not simply their landlord turning up with a pair of rubber boots and a screwdriver.

Had a LL once who fitted a shower with a 10amp fuse and used 5mm wire. I let it run for 10 minutes and the flat smelt like burnt herring. I suggested he get in first.

Plenty of building regs online. Shelter give numbers for local council building inspectors. They can deem property uninhabitable. LL must pay to rehouse you whilst repairs are done, by qualified electricians or gas fitters.

Watch out for kitchen ventilation in older flats.

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I wonder if even a tenth of amateur BTLers are actually certificated to carry out the various repairs for which you need to be qualified?

It might be time for an awareness campaign to ensure that tenants have work carried out on electrics etc. by those proficient to do so, not simply their landlord turning up with a pair of rubber boots and a screwdriver.

The above is true but the reality is - who is going to actually enforce the housing standards?

The housing standards section of your local environmental health dept have no doubt been hacked back to nothing in order to fund the councils growing diversity and strategy talking shop :angry:

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Had a LL once who fitted a shower with a 10amp fuse and used 5mm wire. I let it run for 10 minutes and the flat smelt like burnt herring. I suggested he get in first.

Plenty of building regs online. Shelter give numbers for local council building inspectors. They can deem property uninhabitable. LL must pay to rehouse you whilst repairs are done, by qualified electricians or gas fitters.

Watch out for kitchen ventilation in older flats.

Local Authority Building control, a shadow of their former selves won't be interested. :angry:

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Tim Hague, managing director of mortgages at Birmingham Midshires, said: "With landlords enjoying an average return of 16.3% in 2007, a buy-to-let remains a sound long-term investment.

"We expect firm demand to continue throughout 2008 and beyond."

Are these LIE-to-BUY BTL mortgages?

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Just to clarify the quote from Tim Hague of Birmingham Midshires about the average return of 16.3% for BTL investors in 2007:

Buy to Let Total Returns

• The average total return for a UK BTL investor was 16.3% for 2007 exclusive of fees and mortgage interest costs.This is up from an average total return of 13.5% recorded in 2006.

• By region, total returns for BTL investors were highest in Northern Ireland (44.3%) in 2007. Greater London had the second largest increase with returns of 21.2%, followed by the South East and South West (15.8%).

• The smallest total return for BTL investors in 2007 has been in the East Midlands (11%), North West (12.6%) and West Midlands (13.2%).

• In 2006, BTL returns were again highest in Northern Ireland (34.9%), followed by the North West (17%) and the North (15.1%).

Table 5: Average Buy to Let total returns by RegionRegionTotal return1 % 2006*Total return1 % 2007*1North15.1%14.1%Yorkshire & the Humber14.6%14.2%North West17.0%12.6%East Midlands11.5%11.0%West Midlands14.5%13.2%East Anglia12.9%14.4%Wales9.4%14.1%South West9.6%15.8%South East11.8%15.8%Greater London14.5%21.2%Northern Ireland34.9%44.3%Scotland14.8%15.1%UK13.5%16.3%

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Guest muttley
Just to clarify the quote from Tim Hague of Birmingham Midshires about the average return of 16.3% for BTL investors in 2007:

I'm confused. :blink: Is he talking about yield, yield on original deposit, or what? 16.3% return on an investment sounds brilliant.

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I'm confused. :blink: Is he talking about yield, yield on original deposit, or what? 16.3% return on an investment sounds brilliant.

I do not believe he knows. Probably the largest percent he could calculate from all the numbers available:P

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Just to clarify the quote from Tim Hague of Birmingham Midshires about the average return of 16.3% for BTL investors in 2007:The average total return for a UK BTL investor was 16.3% for 2007 exclusive of fees and mortgage interest costs.This is up from an average total return of 13.5% recorded in 2006.

wtf? is this conman trying to remove the cost of borrowing from an investment!

we really are at tipping point when they have to push this type of garbage.

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I'm confused. :blink: Is he talking about yield, yield on original deposit, or what? 16.3% return on an investment sounds brilliant.

My guess is that it is the average return today... just not for recent landlords. If you bought back in, say, 1980, it isn't hard to see significantly more than a 16.3% return. I see some rents which would clearly be 100% or more.

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Guest muttley
My guess is that it is the average return today... just not for recent landlords. If you bought back in, say, 1980, it isn't hard to see significantly more than a 16.3% return. I see some rents which would clearly be 100% or more.

I suspect that this is the case, which makes the 16.7% meaningless. It's like me saying that shares in a company are a terrific buy because I bought them 20 years ago and the dividend gives me a 75% return on my initial investment. Unfortunately, people read Mr Hagues figures and conclude that BTL is still a good investment, when in reality your money would be earning more in a bank, (even HBOS, Bradford & Bingley and Alliance & Leicester).

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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