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Methinkshe

A Lesson From Nature... A Bit Ot So Mods Move At Your Discretion

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I walked out of my bedroom this morning to see a tawny owl perched on the landing banister - really, truly! It sat there, not moving, even when it saw me. I called my nature-loving son - well, shouted, actually, and still the owl stared at me unblinking from its roost on top of a towel slung over the bannister rail. My son emerged from his bedroom and still the owl didn't move. He walked within 18 ins of it to get to a skylight, opened it, and the owl calmly flew out.

We live in a 350 year old Cornish long house and we have often had birds nest in, and then come down the chimney - rooks, usually - into the room. They flap and kerfuffle all around the room, making a hec of a mess and smashing into windows etc. But we cannot work out how this owl came to be in the house. It was approx 14" tall with a 2 ft wingspan. We have a loft space with a door, which is opoened from time to time and could have been left open long enough to allow an owl that had got into the roofspace access into the house, but the door was closed at the time the owl was perched on the bannister.

This tawny owl just calmly sat and surveyed as I gasped and then shouted for assistance, and then, when the skylight was opened, soared away.

I'm thinking there's a lesson to be learned somewhere here....

Edited for typos

Edited by Methinkshe

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I walked out of my bedroom this morning to see a tawny owl perched on the landing banister - really, truly! It sat there, not moving, even when it saw me. I called my nature-loving son - well, shouted, actually, and still the owl stared at me unblinking from its roost on top of a towel slung over the bannister rail. My son emerged from his bedroom and still the owl didn't move. He walked within 18 ins of it to get to a skylight, opened it, and the owl calmly flew out.

We live in a 350 year old Cornish long house and we have often had birds nest in, and then come down the chimney - rooks, usually - into the room. They flap and kerfuffle all around the room, making a hec of a mess and smashing into windows etc. But we cannot work out how this owl came to be in the house. It was approx 14" tall with a 2 ft wingspan. We have a loft space with a door, which is opoened from time to time and could have been left open long enough to allow an owl that had got into the roofspace access into the house, but the door was closed at the time the owl was perched on the bannister.

This tawny owl just calmly sat and surveyed as I gasped and then shouted for assistance, and then, when the skylight was opened, soared away.

I'm thinking there's a lesson to be learned somewhere here....

Edited for typos

Nice account. Could the owl have got in under the eaves?

When I lived in a cottage surrounded by farmland in the Midlands one of our cats brought in a little owl during the night. When I encountered the owl in the morning the cats were nowhere to be seen. Owl was undamaged, apart from damp neck feathers where he had been grabbed by cat. I released him and he flew down the garden and away over the fields.

Getting a close up look at a tawny owl isn't everyone's luck. I bet your son will remember this incident when you are long gone...

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I walked out of my bedroom this morning to see a tawny owl perched on the landing banister - really, truly! It sat there, not moving, even when it saw me. I called my nature-loving son - well, shouted, actually, and still the owl stared at me unblinking from its roost on top of a towel slung over the bannister rail. My son emerged from his bedroom and still the owl didn't move. He walked within 18 ins of it to get to a skylight, opened it, and the owl calmly flew out.

We live in a 350 year old Cornish long house and we have often had birds nest in, and then come down the chimney - rooks, usually - into the room. They flap and kerfuffle all around the room, making a hec of a mess and smashing into windows etc. But we cannot work out how this owl came to be in the house. It was approx 14" tall with a 2 ft wingspan. We have a loft space with a door, which is opoened from time to time and could have been left open long enough to allow an owl that had got into the roofspace access into the house, but the door was closed at the time the owl was perched on the bannister.

This tawny owl just calmly sat and surveyed as I gasped and then shouted for assistance, and then, when the skylight was opened, soared away.

I'm thinking there's a lesson to be learned somewhere here....

Edited for typos

which is? :ph34r:

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Nice account. Could the owl have got in under the eaves?

When I lived in a cottage surrounded by farmland in the Midlands one of our cats brought in a little owl during the night. When I encountered the owl in the morning the cats were nowhere to be seen. Owl was undamaged, apart from damp neck feathers where he had been grabbed by cat. I released him and he flew down the garden and away over the fields.

Getting a close up look at a tawny owl isn't everyone's luck. I bet your son will remember this incident when you are long gone...

We still haven't worked out how the owl got into the house - whether through an open window or what. There are surrounding barns where over the years we have observed both tawny owls and barn owls, but never from 2ft away and inside the house!

What struck me was the unflappability of the creature.

The epithet "wise" has been attached to owls for good reason, it seems. To observe the owl calmly survey the situation without becoming distressed or panicked, and then to watch and wait for the way out is an object lesson for life, imo, especially in these financially turbulent times. There is something to be said for those who refuse to be panicked and hold steadfastly to a sensible course....

Converesely, the rooks and starlings that have made their way into our house via the chimney just lose it...they fly madly into walls and windows and evenone's head - poo-ing as they go. They are more likely, in their panic, to kill themselves than find the freedom of the window or door opened to allow their escape.

Such a contrast!

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which is? :ph34r:

As above:

The epithet "wise" has been attached to owls for good reason, it seems. To observe the owl calmly survey the situation without becoming distressed or panicked, and then to watch and wait for the way out is an object lesson for life, imo, especially in these financially turbulent times. There is something to be said for those who refuse to be panicked and hold steadfastly to a sensible course....

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Methinkshe, that's a great story - I bloody love owls.

Just a guess but perhaps an owls MO is about stealth and the avoidance of detection - maybe it knows that silent and still works when hunting and also when being hunted, but was wise enough to bugger off sharpish when the chance arrived.

Ashamed to say I've never seen one in the wild, and I've even got a tawny owl whistle which I've been known to toot down the woods on occasion.... :blink: Bloody bumpkins!

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Did it leave a letter for your from hogwarts?

I was just waiting for a Bloo Loo riposte! You have not failed me!

I gather you refer to Harry Potter stuff - they are not books that I have read or even encouraged my children to read - I've always felt that W.E. Johns was a better writer for boys than J.K. Rowling, but because I regularly read book reviews I am not totally unfamiliar with your reference to "Hogwarts". And no, the only calling card it left was a disrupted desk - papers all over the place - in my downstairs study/computer room. I guess it must have had a good look around the house. Perhaps it is because the mice are about again. And nature-loving son had done his nightly mouse-catch joke which is to stay up until we are all asleep and catch a mouse and place it in a cellophane pyramid type container left over from some gift or other which he then hangs from a hook in the sitting room (the hook was probably a meat hook left over from when the sitting room was a pantry. It's left there to catch out the unwary above 5' 4" visitor!)

Anyway, I am waffling - just wanted to say I expected your riposte and thank you for it, Flush in the Pan!

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I was just waiting for a Bloo Loo riposte! You have not failed me!

I gather you refer to Harry Potter stuff - they are not books that I have read or even encouraged my children to read - I've always felt that W.E. Johns was a better writer for boys than J.K. Rowling, but because I regularly read book reviews I am not totally unfamiliar with your reference to "Hogwarts". And no, the only calling card it left was a disrupted desk - papers all over the place - in my downstairs study/computer room. I guess it must have had a good look around the house. Perhaps it is because the mice are about again. And nature-loving son had done his nightly mouse-catch joke which is to stay up until we are all asleep and catch a mouse and place it in a cellophane pyramid type container left over from some gift or other which he then hangs from a hook in the sitting room (the hook was probably a meat hook left over from when the sitting room was a pantry. It's left there to catch out the unwary above 5' 4" visitor!)

Anyway, I am waffling - just wanted to say I expected your riposte and thank you for it, Flush in the Pan!

Bankster. Biggles, now there is a book from the past- do they still publish?

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Bankster. Biggles, now there is a book from the past- do they still publish?

Dunno! I relied on those I brought forward from childhood and thereafter picked up at jumble sales. My kids are a bit too old for them now, although they still take up far too much room on my bookshelves. I'me saving them for my 8 month old grandson.

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It might have been half asleep as it is nocturnal....probably was sleeping there.

Uh-uh! It LOOKED at me - scared the s**t out of me, to be honest. I'm never very good with things in the wrong place - and owls certainly don't belong outside the bedroom door, perched on the landing banister to be encountered as you are on your way to clean your teeth. No, it was well awake - I checked! That is, if eyes open means anything in the owl world.

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Methinkshe, that's a great story - I bloody love owls.

Just a guess but perhaps an owls MO is about stealth and the avoidance of detection - maybe it knows that silent and still works when hunting and also when being hunted, but was wise enough to bugger off sharpish when the chance arrived.

Ashamed to say I've never seen one in the wild, and I've even got a tawny owl whistle which I've been known to toot down the woods on occasion.... :blink: Bloody bumpkins!

Maybe your whistle is the wrong sex. Aren't they the ones where the female goes ter-twit and the male ter-woo? If so heard them a lot recently and seen a brief flap-past one night.

Hit a barn owl with the car one morning on the way to work - came right from the hedge-row, not a chance of missing it and saw it barrel-roll in the rear view mirror. Stopped, looked around for five minutes and eventually found it in the long grass verge, we looked at each other for about a minute and then it just flew off.

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Maybe your whistle is the wrong sex. Aren't they the ones where the female goes ter-twit and the male ter-woo? If so heard them a lot recently and seen a brief flap-past one night.

Hit a barn owl with the car one morning on the way to work - came right from the hedge-row, not a chance of missing it and saw it barrel-roll in the rear view mirror. Stopped, looked around for five minutes and eventually found it in the long grass verge, we looked at each other for about a minute and then it just flew off.

Yes, there was a shortage of Owls recently, but I hear them some nights and have seen them in my headlights frequently the last year or so. This is new, maybe they are taking over.

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I walked out of my bedroom this morning...

I'm thinking there's a lesson to be learned somewhere here....

A tame bird which is used to being in a house and around people, flew in yesterday through an open window and found itself trapped when you closed them in the evening. Lesson - leave a window open for it to fly out of!

I'm such a romantic, prone to flights of fancy...

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Methinkshe, that's a great story - I bloody love owls.

Just a guess but perhaps an owls MO is about stealth and the avoidance of detection - maybe it knows that silent and still works when hunting and also when being hunted, but was wise enough to bugger off sharpish when the chance arrived.

Ashamed to say I've never seen one in the wild, and I've even got a tawny owl whistle which I've been known to toot down the woods on occasion.... :blink: Bloody bumpkins!

You come from Surrey, I see - got to be alright, then! I was born in Godalming and family moved to Cranleigh when I was 6. Have lived in Cornwall for ten years and we see owls all the time - barn owls, little owls, tawny owls, and that's just out of the window. But it's one thing to see an owl perched on a telegraph pole or the roof of a barn, it's another thing to have a close-up encounter. I bet environmental wooftahs would have had multiple organics, but I'm a bit of a scaredy-cat when things are in the wrong place. I appreciate the encounter more in hindsight than at the moment.

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  • 296 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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