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The Masked Tulip

What Affect Will Hpc Have On Cars

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forget HPI. think £3 per litre 2009.

now that'll force bus use, car share and green shit all day long.

£160 to fill your tank - you better go easy on those carbons mother f*cker.

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If HPs fall by the 40 or 50 percent range that many are now expecting what affect, if any, will this have on the price of people's second biggest expenditure - their car?

I think people will go back to jazzing up their cars with go faster stripes.

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If HPs fall by the 40 or 50 percent range that many are now expecting what affect, if any, will this have on the price of people's second biggest expenditure - their car?

None - people will still be duped into buying overpriced new motors thanks to the endless conveyor belt of TV ads proclaiming the need to buy another car (which conveniently fail to mention the incredible cost of insurance, petrol and so on)! :(

Clarkson will reinforce the w*nk fantasy thanks to `Cr*p Gear` on BBC2!

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people will be forced to sell what they can to cover the mortgage, if it comes to that it also means downgrading their cars.

so bigger more expensive cars will take the highest hit, while smaller cars will not be hit so hard.

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I have read before (but don't have a link) that over its lifetime, a car will generate a total cost of something like 4x its original purchase cost.

i.e. insurance, tax, fuel, repairs, MOTs, parking fees/fines, loan finance and so on. Shocking stuff.

Over one's lifetime it doesn't bear thinking about.

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Guest KingCharles1st

I have been wondering this for ages and ages. Being a little connected with the auto industry- I cannot believe the prices you can buy a new car for- but then lets face it, most of them are rubbish.

sooo.. when people stop buying, defaulting- errrrr hold on a mo this has got the brain in gear

Ummmmm--- this is where its going to hit hit next- all those shiny new car CREDIT agreements, based on the supply of free ummm errrr- ahem CREDIT

And CREDIT is now BAD FOR US- isn't it children.

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everyones still presuming fuels going to be £1 a litre.....

think £3 than re-consider the car.

£5 is even better. Price the f*ckers off the road.

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£5 is even better. Price the f*ckers off the road.

Anything that has a poor fuel efficiency will crash in value. If the £2.00 a ltr doesn't get you then the Gov't's made-up-global-warming-green-******-taxes will.

Even smaller more sensible cars like a Ford Focus will still drop in value significantly in the comming recesiion, though obviously not as much as X5s etc.

People won't need a car to get to work when they're unemployed.

Edited by InternationalRockSuperstar

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It's going to be back to the 1970s: cellphones will be unaffordable so dashboard-mounted CB radios will make a come-back :P

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everyones still presuming fuels going to be £1 a litre.....

think £3 than re-consider the car.

Whilst oil price will rise I do not believe that petrol will reach £3.00 litre. 70-80% of the petrol price is made up of tax so if oil even tripled in price petrol would only triple if the goverment was prepared to take all the excise duty that would go with it and of course all the flax...they would vey generously decline to take all the duty and help the economy

Edited by numpty

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I'm currently trying to change cars and am seeing a very stagnant market. There are only, say, 40 cars in the UK for sale of what I want and STILL prices are dropping like stones! I train/cycle to work, so the car I am after is not "run of the mill" and its fair to say these are already being hit hard. I almost bought one just before Christmas....gald I didnt as I'd have already lost thousands!!

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everyones still presuming fuels going to be £1 a litre.....

think £3 than re-consider the car.

your expecting the price of petrol to go from 30p a liter to 230p a liter ( ie a 700% increase)

or are you expecting the tax to go from 70p a liter to 270p a liter (ie 300% incrrease)

unlikely we will see £3 fuel for a long long long time

oil would have to hit $700 a barrel.

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I went into my local Toyota dealers today and was surprised to see several cars with coloured 'crayon' on the windscreens advertising 2 to 2.5K off the price of the new list price. One only offers but they looked more like something you would see in a dodgy second hand dealers the way they were advertised. The used car lot had numerous price reductions listed also with some about 1K off IIRC.

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My business used to take around 20% of its income from car and vehicle leasing companies.

It's now probably less than 2% - from 20% to 2% in 6 months. When I've phoned customers up to ask them why they are not reordering, they say it's nothing to do with us - they are happy with us as a supplier.

The problems are...

1) Lack of inventory - sometimes, it can take 6-9 months to get a car built and dealers have low stocks. If you were in business, would you fancy waiting 7-10 months to get paid?

2) Record finance declines - the rules on prime lending have been tightened. That's fine for your massive fleets. However, most of my customers did 1-3 cars for small companies and they are being turned down at a record rate.

3) Worry over residual values - this has always plagued the industry. A car lease is essentially a bet on the difference between the value of a new car and its value at the end of a 2- or 3-year lease period. The estimates about future worth are varying wildly with tightening credit.

In other words, the car industry, at least on the leasing side, seems to be heading for a perfect storm. This is all anecdotal - at its height, I would take 30-40 orders a month from leasing brokers.

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I glanced at rather dull cars on autotrader.co.uk recently... My Avensis is 6 years old now - and while fine for a while, I casually wondered what the market was like. My guess from advertised prices is that I'd get £3-4K for mine... which is OK... but I was shocked by the things I looked at buying. A car I'd seriously consider as a replacement is the top-of-the-trim-range Honda Accord - 2.2 diesel... and there was one for sale... 2006 car having done under 20K miles... £8200... private vendor.

I'm expecting to see some extremely good cars coming up as distressed sales... though, of course, one would need to be doubly cautious about the potential for being ripped off.

Swapping for something 4 years younger and 40K miles newer for £4K more certainly has some appeal... I'm only put off because there's nothing really wrong with the Avensis now... though I'll want something less aged within a couple of years.

I expect the best deals to be private for the next few years... and with modern cars coming with longer manufacturer warranties, assuming that is in place, I'm assuming that the risk of buying privately is smaller than historically (i.e. while stolen cars; cars with debt owing; badly repaired crashed cars - etc. are still a worry... at least I'd not need to worry about a cat, gearbox etc. failing the week after purchase... if there were a couple of years' manufacturers warranty remaining.)

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I glanced at rather dull cars on autotrader.co.uk recently... My Avensis is 6 years old now - and while fine for a while, I casually wondered what the market was like. My guess from advertised prices is that I'd get £3-4K for mine... which is OK... but I was shocked by the things I looked at buying. A car I'd seriously consider as a replacement is the top-of-the-trim-range Honda Accord - 2.2 diesel... and there was one for sale... 2006 car having done under 20K miles... £8200... private vendor.

I'm expecting to see some extremely good cars coming up as distressed sales... though, of course, one would need to be doubly cautious about the potential for being ripped off.

Swapping for something 4 years younger and 40K miles newer for £4K more certainly has some appeal... I'm only put off because there's nothing really wrong with the Avensis now... though I'll want something less aged within a couple of years.

I expect the best deals to be private for the next few years... and with modern cars coming with longer manufacturer warranties, assuming that is in place, I'm assuming that the risk of buying privately is smaller than historically (i.e. while stolen cars; cars with debt owing; badly repaired crashed cars - etc. are still a worry... at least I'd not need to worry about a cat, gearbox etc. failing the week after purchase... if there were a couple of years' manufacturers warranty remaining.)

Sales of family saloons - Accords, Mondeos, Avensis, etc - have apaprently plummeted as families opt for 4x4s or people carriers. Hence the lower price.

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Sales of family saloons - Accords, Mondeos, Avensis, etc - have apaprently plummeted as families opt for 4x4s or people carriers. Hence the lower price.

Fine by me... Give me a well equipped saloon over a 4x4 any day. My parents have 4x4s - but I'd never drive them by choice. What surprised me most was that my Toyota saloon seems to have depreciated slower than the Honda saloon - despite the Honda saloon being broadly acknowledged as being a superior car. The Avensis is OK - but the trim does feel somewhat tacky... it isn't luxury. I chose it because the otherwise comparable (same age/miles) nearly-new Accord was 50% more expensive at the time. I think it a pity that more of the conservatively styled saloons aren't 4wd though... :o)

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Fine by me... Give me a well equipped saloon over a 4x4 any day. My parents have 4x4s - but I'd never drive them by choice. What surprised me most was that my Toyota saloon seems to have depreciated slower than the Honda saloon - despite the Honda saloon being broadly acknowledged as being a superior car. The Avensis is OK - but the trim does feel somewhat tacky... it isn't luxury. I chose it because the otherwise comparable (same age/miles) nearly-new Accord was 50% more expensive at the time. I think it a pity that more of the conservatively styled saloons aren't 4wd though... :o)

Which Avensis do you have - the current model or the previous one?

The Accord never took off as a company car because it was basically too expensive - when the new model came out it got into the Mercedes and BMW price range, plus it did not have a hatch so that rule it out for loads of private buyers who wanted a hatch.

Edited by The Masked Tulip

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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