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Tax Abuser Of The Week

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Golden Trough Award

Director of Children Schools and Families, LONDON BOROUGH OF CAMDEN

Industry: Senior executive - General,Social care - Children's care Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: £126,000 - £154,000 (plus prp)

Silver Trough Award

Deputy Chief Executive, HULL CITY COUNCIL

Industry: Government - Local government,Senior executive - Government Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: Circa £126K pa

Amusing Jobs of the Week

Pupil Inclusion Coordinator, LONDON BOROUGH OF SOUTHWARK

Head of Diversity, AUDIT COMMISSION

Democratic Services Team Leader, LONDON BOROUGH OF LAMBETH

Extended Schools Cluster Co-ordinator, LONDON BOROUGH OF TOWER HAMLETS

Climate Change Programme Support Officer, DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL

Busness Process Re-engineering Project Manager, LONDON BOROUGH OF BARKING AND DAGENHAM

Capacity Building Officer, WOLVERHAMPTON CITY COUNCIL

Industry: Government - Local government,Social care - General Contract: Contract

Hours: Full Time Salary: £28,172 - £30,598

We are seeking a key post to our Community Regeneration Team and you could play a pivotal role in supporting a programme-wide approach to building community capacity and cohesion.

Other tax abusers

Corporate Director Environment, CUMBRIA COUNTY COUNCIL

Industry: Environment - General,Government - Local government, Senior executive - Government

Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: £125k

Corporate Director Resources, CUMBRIA COUNTY COUNCIL

Industry: Government - Local government,Senior executive - Government

Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: £125k

Director of Social Care and Learning, BRACKNELL FOREST BC

Industry: Government - Local government,Senior executive - Government, Social care - Children's care

Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: Circa £125,000 pa

Executive Director of Children, Young People and Families, OLDHAM METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL

Industry: Senior executive - General,Social care - Children's care, Social care - Youth work

Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: up to £120k

Chief Executive, ENFIELD HOMES

Industry: Housing - General,Senior executive - General Contract: Permanent Hours: Full Time

Salary: £115,000 + up to £10,000 PRP pa

Executive Director of Finance, RICHMOND HOUSING

Industry: Finance - Accountancy,Housing - General, Senior executive - General Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: Up to £110k

Directors – School Improvement, VT EDUCATION & SKILLS

Industry: Education - General,Senior executive - Education

Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: Package to £110k

Head of Housing and Environmental Health, LONDON BOROUGH OF BARNET

Industry: Environment - General,Government - Local government, Housing - Homelessness, Senior executive - Government

Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: c. £108k

Chief Learning & School Improvement Officer, LONDON BOROUGH OF REDBRIDGE

Industry: Education - Primary,Education - Secondary, Senior executive - Government

Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: Up to £101,000

Vice Principal Curriculum & Learner Experience, COLLEGE OF NORTH EAST LONDON

Industry: Education - Further,Senior executive - Education Contract: Permanent

Hours: Full Time

Salary: £101,000 plus benefits

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Pupil Inclusion Coordinator, LONDON BOROUGH OF SOUTHWARK

Head of Diversity, AUDIT COMMISSION

Democratic Services Team Leader, LONDON BOROUGH OF LAMBETH

Extended Schools Cluster Co-ordinator, LONDON BOROUGH OF TOWER HAMLETS

Climate Change Programme Support Officer, DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL

Busness Process Re-engineering Project Manager, LONDON BOROUGH OF BARKING AND DAGENHAM

Whist the others are mostly valid roles, albeit obscenely overpaid imo, the ones I've quoted are just ridiculous.

Edited by Prophet_of_Pwnage

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Whist the others are mostly valid roles, albeit obscenely overpaid imo, the ones I've quoted are just ridiculous.

Democratic Services Team Leader is in fact the job title I used to report to back in 2004. It's what used to be called "Head of Committee Services". Nothing wrong with that, someone has to arrange the meetings, take the minutes, run the elections, hire people to count the votes, etc. Democratic Services is a better description of that than Committee Services was.

Pupil Inclusion depends what they do - if they're in charge of catching truants, it's fair enough. If they're in charge of stopping yobs being expelled, it's unfortunate (but the fault of government policy, not the Council)

Climate change support has in my experience usually paid for itself several times over as they look at ways to spend less on travel and electricity - a good idea whatever you think about global warming.

Diversity you either care about or you don't, I'm inclined to agree we spend too much on it (and achieve too little in doing so) and business process re-engineering is just the latest in a long list of job titles that started in the twenties with time and motion study manager. If you do it well, you might save a fortune, otherwise you're a pointless dead weight.

The Golden Trough appears to be a job from last week's list which many of us pointed out was paying pretty much the going rate for that sort of skill set, and for which it was very important to get the right person - running out of ideas?

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The Golden Trough appears to be a job from last week's list which many of us pointed out was paying pretty much the going rate for that sort of skill set, and for which it was very important to get the right person - running out of ideas?

How did we manage before we employed all these overpaid pen pushers?

Its reassuring that in todays NuLabour Britain the public servant is remunerated as though they were in fact the master.

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How did we manage before we employed all these overpaid pen pushers?

Its reassuring that in todays NuLabour Britain the public servant is remunerated as though they were in fact the master.

As we discussed last week, rubbish.

Find me someone in the private sector in charge of the scale, complexity and budget of an operation like a London Council's services for children - that's schools; protecting children who might be neglected or abused (your neck on the line if you take one into care you shouldn't have, or fail to take one you should have); services for disabled and very sick children (in Camden this includes liaising with the home authorities of kids in Great Ormond Street, and the hospital itself, over who pays for what and making sure services aren't duplicated or missed out); careers advisers; children and adolescent mental health services; foster care or adoption or residential care for orphans; youth offending; sorting out what happens when underage asylum seekers (or overage asylum seekers claiming to be underage) appear; childcare / state nurseries; play libraries, and in the meantime of running all those services, keeping an eye on the budget for them, the state of the buildings they use, what swerve the government is going to bowl you next etc - and I'll guarantee they're paid at least twice that wage, probably four times.

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As we discussed last week, rubbish.

Find me someone in the private sector in charge of the scale, complexity and budget of an operation like a London Council's services for children - that's schools; protecting children who might be neglected or abused (your neck on the line if you take one into care you shouldn't have, or fail to take one you should have); services for disabled and very sick children (in Camden this includes liaising with the home authorities of kids in Great Ormond Street, and the hospital itself, over who pays for what and making sure services aren't duplicated or missed out); careers advisers; children and adolescent mental health services; foster care or adoption or residential care for orphans; youth offending; sorting out what happens when underage asylum seekers (or overage asylum seekers claiming to be underage) appear; childcare / state nurseries; play libraries, and in the meantime of running all those services, keeping an eye on the budget for them, the state of the buildings they use, what swerve the government is going to bowl you next etc - and I'll guarantee they're paid at least twice that wage, probably four times.

Like I said how did we cope before?

You are or have been one of these Local Authority spongers aren't you?

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Like I said how did we cope before?

Before what? We've had this kind of role since at least the 1960s and it's always been a well paid job (probably better in the past in real terms - certainly in real house price terms). In fact it's a merger of two roles, the old Director of Social Services, and the old Chief Education Officer post. If you mean before we had local government children's services at all (so, the early Victorian age), we coped with it patchily, through big children's homes, charities, borstals, workhouses, abuse and neglect going undetected, and generally an aspect of that age that most of us wouldn't want to go back to.

If you want to reduce how much Councils cost, there are sensible ways of doing it. The pension scheme is a long-term financial nightmare (and I've opted out of it, both because I don't think it's right and because I don't think it will exist when I reach retirement age), and also more importantly there are too many councils in London - 33 when it should be more like 12-18; merge Camden with Islington, Hackney with Newham, Lambeth with Southwark, Enfield with Haringey, Richmond with Kingston, etc. It's odd though, everyone hates their council until you try and do away with it.

You are or have been one of these Local Authority spongers aren't you?

Given that I said I used to report to a Head of Democratic Services, it's hardly a secret that I work in Local Government, is it? Anyway yes, I now work largely on researching the differences between how to deliver services in towns as against how to deliver services in the countryside, and in particular on helping rural councils persuade the Government to give them the flexibility in legislation and regulation to do what's right for their local areas, rather than all policy being made on the basis of what works in Islington and Sheffield. I've just completed a research report on what you do when a seriously disabled child turns 16/18/21 and all the relevant laws change because they're now an adult. You're welcome to describe it as sponging if you want, it's in fact fairly important to those families that we get it right.

For your next question, the reason I'm posting on here in working hours is that I have a meeting at 10am on the other side of town from my office, so going there would be futile as I'd have to leave straight away. Though I probably ought to set off about now.

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Before what? We've had this kind of role since at least the 1960s and it's always been a well paid job (probably better in the past in real terms - certainly in real house price terms). In fact it's a merger of two roles, the old Director of Social Services, and the old Chief Education Officer post. If you mean before we had local government children's services at all (so, the early Victorian age), we coped with it patchily, through big children's homes, charities, borstals, workhouses, abuse and neglect going undetected, and generally an aspect of that age that most of us wouldn't want to go back to.

If you want to reduce how much Councils cost, there are sensible ways of doing it. The pension scheme is a long-term financial nightmare (and I've opted out of it, both because I don't think it's right and because I don't think it will exist when I reach retirement age), and also more importantly there are too many councils in London - 33 when it should be more like 12-18; merge Camden with Islington, Hackney with Newham, Lambeth with Southwark, Enfield with Haringey, Richmond with Kingston, etc. It's odd though, everyone hates their council until you try and do away with it.

Given that I said I used to report to a Head of Democratic Services, it's hardly a secret that I work in Local Government, is it? Anyway yes, I now work largely on researching the differences between how to deliver services in towns as against how to deliver services in the countryside, and in particular on helping rural councils persuade the Government to give them the flexibility in legislation and regulation to do what's right for their local areas, rather than all policy being made on the basis of what works in Islington and Sheffield. I've just completed a research report on what you do when a seriously disabled child turns 16/18/21 and all the relevant laws change because they're now an adult. You're welcome to describe it as sponging if you want, it's in fact fairly important to those families that we get it right.

For your next question, the reason I'm posting on here in working hours is that I have a meeting at 10am on the other side of town from my office, so going there would be futile as I'd have to leave straight away. Though I probably ought to set off about now.

Obviously because I work in the private sector I will have to keep it short.

I've just recieved my annual council tax bill please do the decent thing and get a proper job and stop sponging off the private sector.

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Obviously because I work in the private sector I will have to keep it short.

And since I don't, you'll outright have to wait until outside working hours for a reply

I've just recieved my annual council tax bill please do the decent thing and get a proper job and stop sponging off the private sector.

I bet it's less than mine... anyway, I could do that. I could do what my friend who did the same course at the same university in the year below did and go into the city as a fund analyst. He currently earns 50% more than me, with the potential of up to 100% bonus. Or I could be a financial recruiter like a friend in my year, he earns well over triple what I do including bonus.

Do either of them actually make anyone's life better, apart from by making the rich richer? Probably not. Do the public have any say over whether they are employed? No. Do the public have a say over whether I am employed? Yes. Would me changing job to the private sector save you any money? No - it would cost you money in fact, because not only would you be replaced, but we'd have the same problem we had last time when my colleague left - nobody prepared to do the job for the money we were offering, even though I think it's quite reasonable, so we had to pay more.

And I bet my replacement would join the pension scheme, unlike me.

Edited by jdc

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And since I don't, you'll outright have to wait until outside working hours for a reply

I bet it's less than mine... anyway, I could do that. I could do what my friend who did the same course at the same university in the year below did and go into the city as a fund analyst. He currently earns 50% more than me, with the potential of up to 100% bonus. Or I could be a financial recruiter like a friend in my year, he earns well over triple what I do including bonus.

Do either of them actually make anyone's life better, apart from by making the rich richer? Probably not. Do the public have any say over whether they are employed? No. Do the public have a say over whether I am employed? Yes. Would me changing job to the private sector save you any money? No - it would cost you money in fact, because not only would you be replaced, but we'd have the same problem we had last time when my colleague left - nobody prepared to do the job for the money we were offering, even though I think it's quite reasonable, so we had to pay more.

And I bet my replacement would join the pension scheme, unlike me.

A mate of mine who has worked in the public sector for 8 years has just been poached by a private firm. In the State sector he was on 30K. Private sector offer - 50K. Similar pension deal, similar annual leave, same hours except the company said he can work from home 1-2 days a week.

I will be interested to see in 6 months which job involved more work given that he was run ragged at xxxx shitty council

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  • 297 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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