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gruffydd

Chilling Leader From The Guardian

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/ma...p;feed=politics

Extract:

The idea is a clever one - maybe too clever. Mr Darling is trying to kickstart the UK mortgage market, but there is a much more straightforward way to tackle the credit crunch: insist the regulators ensure that banks and building societies do not unnecessarily starve borrowers of credit. Lenders have a duty of care to those homeowners they were so desperate to attract just a few months ago with big loans at low interest rates. Supporting borrowers would be a more straightforward way of achieving what Mr Darling wants. And it may also be a more popular policy.

Edited by gruffydd

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/ma...p;feed=politics

Extract:

The idea is a clever one - maybe too clever. Mr Darling is trying to kickstart the UK mortgage market, but there is a much more straightforward way to tackle the credit crunch: insist the regulators ensure that banks and building societies do not unnecessarily starve borrowers of credit. Lenders have a duty of care to those homeowners they were so desperate to attract just a few months ago with big loans at low interest rates. Supporting borrowers would be a more straightforward way of achieving what Mr Darling wants. And it may also be a more popular policy.

Errr, so the regulators should force the banks to lend money to people whom they judge are a bad risk? What a load of ****!

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The Guardian has been a big BTL and foreign property ramper, so this comes as no surprise. I would imagine that many of the key editorial staff have a big exposure to the current problems in the property market.

Let 'em burn!! :lol:

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Been noticing loads of property market VI budget-related pressure being piled on the government

Like this:

David Pretty, chairman of the New Homes Marketing Board:

The current stamp duty regime now represents an unfair tax on young buyers who can least afford it. Increasing the threshold to £250,000 for first-time buyers would take the vast majority of them out of this tax trap. There are a number of government initiatives in place to help first-timers, but they help relatively small numbers. What we need is more general assistance on a national scale. Apart from stamp duty relief, I would like the government to actively encourage saving for deposits – particularly important now that bigger deposits are required – and to take up my proposal to give tax relief on parental contributions to their children's homebuying efforts.

Expect to be shocked - been speaking to public affairs contacts over the last few weeks and lobbyists for the property VIs have been incredibly busy around Westminster, etc., whilst we've been asleep.

Edited by gruffydd

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2008/ma...p;feed=politics

Extract:

The idea is a clever one - maybe too clever. Mr Darling is trying to kickstart the UK mortgage market, but there is a much more straightforward way to tackle the credit crunch: insist the regulators ensure that banks and building societies do not unnecessarily starve borrowers of credit. Lenders have a duty of care to those homeowners they were so desperate to attract just a few months ago with big loans at low interest rates. Supporting borrowers would be a more straightforward way of achieving what Mr Darling wants. And it may also be a more popular policy.

As someone mentioned here a week or so ago: a better way of dealing with the problem would be to let those that have borrowed irresponsibly go bankrupt. Let those that lent the money irresponsibly go bust.

Let those that have borrowed (and saved) and lent responsibly take the benefit thereafter.

Edited by Notlongnow

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Interesting concept. I guess that means that the customers have a duty of care to the gas companies too?

We all have positive obligations to people we have never met.

It's the socialist way. :rolleyes::ph34r:

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Is it odd that the Guardian Socialists think that the answer is to throw money at it ?

I think not, the last decade of political decadence has turned the Economy of the UK into a casaulty that needs wheeling off to IC for some seriously detailed analysis. Its most likely terminal now, Gordon should be wearing the placard

DO NOT RESUSCITATE

Edited by laurejon

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Been noticing loads of property market VI budget-related pressure being piled on the government

Like this:

David Pretty, chairman of the New Homes Marketing Board:

The current stamp duty regime now represents an unfair tax on young buyers who can least afford it. Increasing the threshold to £250,000 for first-time buyers would take the vast majority of them out of this tax trap. There are a number of government initiatives in place to help first-timers, but they help relatively small numbers. What we need is more general assistance on a national scale. Apart from stamp duty relief, I would like the government to actively encourage saving for deposits – particularly important now that bigger deposits are required – and to take up my proposal to give tax relief on parental contributions to their children's homebuying efforts.

Expect to be shocked - been speaking to public affairs contacts over the last few weeks and lobbyists for the property VIs have been incredibly busy around Westminster, etc., whilst we've been asleep.

B*llocks! It`s much easier for everyone if the price of houses just go through the floor. Trying to hold this mess together would be like a tramp who has sh*t himself trying to bluff his way into The Ritz, far easier just to let it go and have another bottle of White Lightning.

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I am surprised that the article did not also point out that not lending money on the grounds of credit worthiness is discriminatory and an infringement of their human rights.

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As someone mentioned here a week or so ago: a better way of dealing with the problem would be to let those that have borrowed irresponsibly go bankrupt. Let those that lent the money irresponsibly go bust.

Let those that have borrowed (and saved) and lent responsibility take the benefit thereafter.

New Labour are not going to allow the Unions to go bankrupt, without the Unions and the Communist Party New Labour are sunk.

Northern Rock is a prime example of the Unions pressure on New Labour. Gordon's Testicles are in the Unions Vice, if he plays his cards right they will continue to massage them, one wrong move and the Vice gets two turns!!!!.

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B*llocks! It`s much easier for everyone if the price of houses just go through the floor. Trying to hold this mess together would be like a tramp who has sh*t himself trying to bluff his way into The Ritz, far easier just to let it go and have another bottle of White Lightning.

To to honest, this is what is so petrifying about this labour government. I was talking in the pub last night, and the general consensus was that there was no difference between Labour and the Tories.

However, this Labour lot will intervene to the nth degree to try and stop this housing market and economy from bombing. I do think that this time, intervention will be fututile, but there seems to be a general opinion that more and more intervention will prevent problems. The reality being it will just store greater problems for later on.

Lets just let the market economy do its job and allow all markets to adjust back (down) to their long run economic equilibriums.

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Don't underestimate any governments attempts to avoid a crash. Since when did morals dictate any politicians actions? We've even just been denied a referendum on the euro treaty for chissakes.

It's too early to call a crash yet. However outrageous, the govt will pull something out of the hat to at least delay it.

Or they'll die trying.

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As someone mentioned here a week or so ago: a better way of dealing with the problem would be to let those that have borrowed irresponsibly go bankrupt. Let those that lent the money irresponsibly go bust.

Let those that have borrowed (and saved) and lent responsibility take the benefit thereafter.

You can`t make fast crazy profits from being responsible though. You can`t from mass defaults either, so I agree that this may be the way of the near term future.

Edited by dances with sheeple

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Let those that have borrowed (and saved) and lent responsibility take the benefit thereafter

The bottom line is that they need the people who aren't hocked up to the eyeballs in debt in order to get us out of this mess. A reversal of the massive transfer of wealth away from the prudent towards the indebted will be necessary to get them out spending money in the economy. The boot is really on the other foot now.

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To to honest, this is what is so petrifying about this labour government. I was talking in the pub last night, and the general consensus was that there was no difference between Labour and the Tories.

However, this Labour lot will intervene to the nth degree to try and stop this housing market and economy from bombing. I do think that this time, intervention will be fututile, but there seems to be a general opinion that more and more intervention will prevent problems. The reality being it will just store greater problems for later on.

Lets just let the market economy do its job and allow all markets to adjust back (down) to their long run economic equilibriums.

The difference between Labour and the Tories (this time around) is that under the Tories it was far easier to claim funding to "better" yourself, whether it was a couple of nights at the local college or University access. Someone can put me right, but I believe that the Thatcher and Major governments did stand by their "get on your bike" message to some extent. That all ended when Blair took power, you had to borrow for your education, and pay it all back, making the excercise pointless in a lot of cases. If you have contributed to the tax take in any way, or are likely to do so in the future (or if your parents or grandparents have) then all education and training after leaving secondary school should be free.

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To to honest, this is what is so petrifying about this labour government. I was talking in the pub last night, and the general consensus was that there was no difference between Labour and the Tories.

However, this Labour lot will intervene to the nth degree to try and stop this housing market and economy from bombing. I do think that this time, intervention will be fututile, but there seems to be a general opinion that more and more intervention will prevent problems. The reality being it will just store greater problems for later on.

Lets just let the market economy do its job and allow all markets to adjust back (down) to their long run economic equilibriums.

Not going to happen m8. All the productive jobs have been offshored, business offshored, we dont actually produce anthing of value, even the people are now of little value as they lack basic skills. The only thing that has kept our economy is large borrowings, massive debts, and House Price Inflation.

Take away House Price Inflation has finished, so its curtains for UK PLC.

Edited by laurejon

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The difference between Labour and the Tories (this time around) is that under the Tories it was far easier to claim funding to "better" yourself, whether it was a couple of nights at the local college or University access. Someone can put me right, but I believe that the Thatcher and Major governments did stand by their "get on your bike" message to some extent. That all ended when Blair took power, you had to borrow for your education, and pay it all back, making the excercise pointless in a lot of cases. If you have contributed to the tax take in any way, or are likely to do so in the future (or if your parents or grandparents have) then all education and training after leaving secondary school should be free.

Confirmed, I retrained from Bricklayer, to Project Manager, to IT consultant, going from 15k Per annum to 70k per annum.

Labour have robbed many generations of a decent honest life, they have robbed them of the chance to create a stable family, and they have robbed them of the chance to have a future.

But it doesnt matter, some public sector workers now drive Mercs and no longer wear blue overalls.

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The bottom line is that they need the people who aren't hocked up to the eyeballs in debt in order to get us out of this mess. A reversal of the massive transfer of wealth away from the prudent towards the indebted will be necessary to get them out spending money in the economy. The boot is really on the other foot now.

These types of people tend not to participate in the type of debt creation system that has led to this mess though. The people who planned to profit from the last ten years probably have made their profit. The people getting burned were never clued up players. There will be other financial "plots" as long as the sheeple fail to learn their lesson. I think the system of the last few years is probably busted? they probably said that after the Great Depression as well.

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The difference between Labour and the Tories (this time around) is that under the Tories it was far easier to claim funding to "better" yourself, whether it was a couple of nights at the local college or University access. Someone can put me right, but I believe that the Thatcher and Major governments did stand by their "get on your bike" message to some extent. That all ended when Blair took power, you had to borrow for your education, and pay it all back, making the excercise pointless in a lot of cases. If you have contributed to the tax take in any way, or are likely to do so in the future (or if your parents or grandparents have) then all education and training after leaving secondary school should be free.

Quite right. Without wanting to get too political about it: Labour seemed to have reduced any incentive for the individual to better themselves. Assisted places, for all of its critics, was a fantastic idea.

Speaking to a student last year, it was mentioned that alot of Graduates now take out an IVA / Bankrupcy as soon as they graduate as way to clear their debt, (and that was before the Credit Crunch kicked off) which is a really sorry state of affairs and indicative of the what is required in Tonys Britain to get on. I don't blame them for doing it at all.

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My Colleague lived in a Council House, and came from a poor but happy and supportive family.

He attended a Grammer School, achieved good set of A levels, and went on to be a figher pilot in the RAF, and then a Commercial Pilot for Quantas.

Thank You Gordon Brown, you are an Ars3!!!!!.

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Not going to happen m8. All the productive jobs have been offshored, business offshored, we dont actually produce anthing of value, even the people are now of little value as they lack basic skills. The only thing that has kept our economy is large borrowings, massive debts, and House Price Inflation.

Take away House Price Inflation has finished, so its curtains for UK PLC.

In a global "funny money" culture everything is going to be offshored for the right price, but in a depression culture everything is quickly going to be onshored. UK can produce a lot of it`s own food and energy, and it obviously still produces thinking minds if this site is anything to go by. The consumption/aspiration to be a "celeb" life may be over, but life as we know it is a long way from over, Uk will learn a hard lesson, as will USA and others will also, but no way we will not rebuild something worthwhile. The best lesson the USA can learn is to stop f*cking with other countries in a millitary sense, make your country truly appealing, and you won`t have to force others to come round to your point of view.

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My Colleague lived in a Council House, and came from a poor but happy and supportive family.

He attended a Grammer School, achieved good set of A levels, and went on to be a figher pilot in the RAF, and then a Commercial Pilot for Quantas.

Thank You Gordon Brown, you are an Ars3!!!!!.

3 a levels?

Those are the sort of qualifications you need to unblock toilets or answer phones these days. The paper qualification inflation is simply criminal. You'll need a degree to pack pasta or push a trolley around asda carpark, the way it's going.

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3 a levels?

Those are the sort of qualifications you need to unblock toilets or answer phones these days. The paper qualification inflation is simply criminal. You'll need a degree to pack pasta or push a trolley around asda carpark, the way it's going.

4 A levels, Science and Maths, English, Geography.

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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