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jimmy_joe

Silver Coins

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Can someone explain what the difference is between these 2 silver coins please? They contain the same weight of silver and appear to have the same design (though the picures use differnet lighting). The obvious differences are the names, the presentation and the price. Is that all there is? The circulation numbers of each are quite different, but if the coins are the same then it's really the number of presentation boxes that is limited.

Pictures 2 and 3 show the coins in more detail.

2007 Britannia £2 Silver Bullion

http://www.royalmint.com/PackedSets/BR07AG.aspx

2007 Britannia Silver Proof £2 One Ounce

http://www.royalmint.com/PackedSets/BR07SO.aspx

Incidentally, there are some of the bullion coins on ebay selling for more than they are from the royal mint, after delivery costs.

Edit: how do I edit the title? Bullion, not bullon!

Edited by jimmy_joe

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Bullion and proof are different grades of coin.

Proofs are made differently. If memory serves - double struck - to give a sharper and more defined image.

When buying a bullion coin the quality of the coin (dents, marks etc) is relatively unimportant, you are simply buying the metal.

With proofs the quality of the coin is important - it starts out at a higher grade - any dents or marks reduces the value of the coin.

Coin collectors will pay higher prices to get a proof and may want all the dates of a coin set etc.

It is a bit like stamp collecting, the paper is worthless, but the stamps image gives it value.

Here the proof is worth more because coin collectors (numismatists) will paid more for a nice shiney coin.

The value of a bullion coin is really the spot price of the metal

the value of a proof is the spot price + whatever a collector will pay.

You pays your money and takes you choice.

( I nearly bought a proof gold britannia cos it was pretty, but choose not to because I thought coin collecting wasn't really for me, a bit train spotter ish?)

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I got some silver britannia's today and there is a brownish mark on some of their circumferences - is this a normal oxidation process or something, or did they see me coming!!

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I got some silver britannia's today and there is a brownish mark on some of their circumferences - is this a normal oxidation process or something, or did they see me coming!!

Melted chocolate? :ph34r:

The condition of some coins can better be maintained if they're kept in the fridge...

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I got some silver britannia's today and there is a brownish mark on some of their circumferences - is this a normal oxidation process or something, or did they see me coming!!

I guess some silver dip would remove this.

Just don't use it on numismatic coins as it can greatly impact the value.

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Thanks for the replies

I have posted a pic below to show what I mean

I got these (private sale) from someone who I trust, so I was only joking when doubting their authenticity

Narco - you mentioned numismatic coins, are these proof coins?

silver.jpg

Edited by prophet-profit

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Narco - you mentioned numismatic coins, are these proof coins?

Numismatics are the collectable rare or historical coins that are graded.

Your coin is just a bullion coin where you've generally invested in the silver content only.

I'm not a coin expert however so don't hold me to that. ;)

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Thanks for the replies

I have posted a pic below to show what I mean

I got these (private sale) from someone who I trust, so I was only joking when doubting their authenticity

Narco - you mentioned numismatic coins, are these proof coins?

silver.jpg

Hi

Some of my coins have the same tarnishing. Silver tarnishes, gold doesn't. The reason why it only appears on the edge is because the coin has been stored in a coin capsule and that is where air has leaked into the capsule. The tarnishing can be accelerated by the proximity of other items. I cant remember what items you should keep away from silver, but a bit of research on the www would tell you.

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Hi

Some of my coins have the same tarnishing. Silver tarnishes, gold doesn't. The reason why it only appears on the edge is because the coin has been stored in a coin capsule and that is where air has leaked into the capsule. The tarnishing can be accelerated by the proximity of other items. I cant remember what items you should keep away from silver, but a bit of research on the www would tell you.

It's absolutely not a problem. As Azazel says it where the coin capsule has not been air-tight. Sulphur in the air has reacted with the silver to produce silver sulphide.

If you really wish to clean it (& most coin collectors prefer that you don't), do not use abrasive rubbing. Personally I've used Silver Dip on lightly tarnished silver proof Britannias - but only for a few seconds. Use latex gloves, place coin in small container e.g. screw jar lid. Pour dip over coin, leave for 10 s. Submerging for a long period will pit the silver and remove factory-applied patinas. Rinse well under water (filtered is best). Place coin on soft camera lens cleaning cloth (tissues contain wood elements which can scratch). To dry dab coin with another cloth - do not rub.

Note dips are made of an acid and complexing agent that contain thiourea, a cancer-causing chemical. This colorless and odorless chemical can be absorbed through the skin and can be harmful to breathe.

Once coin is clean & fully dry. Place in coin capsule and ensure it is properly tightened up.

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many thanks one and all; muchos gracias

ps Zadkiel - Excellent advice on the cleaning side - appreciated.

pps Ologhai Jones - 'Nik Nak' is no more unfortunately :( , it was time for a change!

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well i never knew this differnce b/w coins

thanks to u ppl

________________________________

William

Everyone knows the value of the US Dollar is going down - the only thing that keeps its value is metals - In the early 1900's and ounce of Gold bought a real nice suit - Gold then was around $20 an ounce. Today that same Ounce of Gold Will buy a real nice suit but that $20 would maybe get you a nice tie.

To fight off inflation everyone should be purchasing Gold and Silver in some form - Gold Coins - Silver Coins or bullion / bars

The best way to start is to start out with a simple program called Silver Snowball - You can visit my site, join and start your collection today. http://www.silversnowball.com/27

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  • 294 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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