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You know about Zimbabwe and their inflation but did you know about these ruins from 50000 years ago in Zimbabwe.

http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&am...mages&gbv=2

Been there, done that and I'm sure others on here have been there too. No one know who built them or when but they certainly weren't built by the present local tribes anymore than stone henge was built by anglo saxons. 50,000 years ago ? Pull the other one....

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You know about Zimbabwe and their inflation but did you know about these ruins from 50000 years ago in Zimbabwe.

http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&am...mages&gbv=2

I visited them in 1963. It was still Rhodesia in those days but IIRC they were called the Zimbabwe ruins even then. Quite an eerie place as I remember but nothing like as spooky as the Matopos, where CJ Rhodes was buried. There are definitely things that we humans do not fully understand about our earth. Nothing to do with Rhodes, it is just a very strange area.

p-o-p

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I never once visited those ruins in the whole 20 years I lived in that country.

Apparently they were built in the 7th century by the Iron age people, then abandoned, then resettled again in 14th century blah, blah......

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I visited them in 1963. It was still Rhodesia in those days but IIRC they were called the Zimbabwe ruins even then. Quite an eerie place as I remember but nothing like as spooky as the Matopos, where CJ Rhodes was buried. There are definitely things that we humans do not fully understand about our earth. Nothing to do with Rhodes, it is just a very strange area.

p-o-p

Yeah , Rhodes must have felt it too ....guess that's why he asked to be buried there. The wife and I went several times. I enjoyed calling the lizards to come and eat bread out of my hands too, I guess that part of Zimbabwe will never change.

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Been there, done that and I'm sure others on here have been there too. No one know who built them or when but they certainly weren't built by the present local tribes anymore than stone henge was built by anglo saxons. 50,000 years ago ? Pull the other one....

Incidentally work on stone henge is about to re commence after it was mothballed in 2000 bc during the house price crash of the time

Flats in the equinox area are expected to be sold for at least 3 gold torques each if credit is available.................

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I visited them in 1963. It was still Rhodesia in those days but IIRC they were called the Zimbabwe ruins even then. Quite an eerie place as I remember but nothing like as spooky as the Matopos, where CJ Rhodes was buried. There are definitely things that we humans do not fully understand about our earth. Nothing to do with Rhodes, it is just a very strange area.

p-o-p

You ever read any Wilbur Smith?

He's got a whole series of historical novels set in Zimbabwe/SA during the Victorian era which goes into the tribal rivalries/the matopos/The umlimo etc. etc. Not for the intellectual/academic, but brilliant fun and good for learning a bit of accurate background abolut these things. Smith's books are always meticulously researched).

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Do you think they'll bury Van Hoogstraten there, too?

I don't think the government are very happy that Rhodes and a couple of other white people are buried there (Matopos), I guess his ashes could be scattered there though. Who would know.

What was the subject of this thread anyway?

Btw, has anyone been to the chimanimani mountains ? Now there's a place !

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I don't think the government are very happy that Rhodes and a couple of other white people are buried there (Matopos), I guess his ashes could be scattered there though. Who would know.

What was the subject of this thread anyway?

Btw, has anyone been to the chimanimani mountains ? Now there's a place !

To try and keep it broadly on topic, I don't think that Zim is a good idea yet but this looked rather more inspiring that an semi in suburban north-London for much the same price. (In Zambia although as it is an island in the Zambezi, perhaps not)

http://www.primelocation.com/international.../STOC999000103/

p-o-p

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To try and keep it broadly on topic, I don't think that Zim is a good idea yet but this looked rather more inspiring that an semi in suburban north-London for much the same price. (In Zambia although as it is an island in the Zambezi, perhaps not)

http://www.primelocation.com/international.../STOC999000103/

p-o-p

Keeping on topic by moving a few hundred miles northwest !? Like it!

Overpriced but would make a good bolt-hole for ex hedge fund managers.

I wonder if Zambia still does that thing where anyone with U.S. dollars to invest can borrow land from the government to start a coffee plantation. Back 1992 you needed an investment of $20,000 only. I guess now it would be $60,000 but not a lot of money in Pound terms. I remember back in 1988, Zambia was in a state of collapse and remember seeing truck loads of food being driven over the Zim border. How things have changed...

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To try and keep it broadly on topic, I don't think that Zim is a good idea yet but this looked rather more inspiring that an semi in suburban north-London for much the same price. (In Zambia although as it is an island in the Zambezi, perhaps not)

http://www.primelocation.com/international.../STOC999000103/

p-o-p

I've been to them both!

Bovu is just a muddy island, Jungle Junction is actually pretty cool.

The fishing is Hot hot hot , tons of big tiger fish that'll strip your reel as they disappear unstoppably 300 yards across the zambezi.

Watch out for the Hippos though, they used to "lose" guests on a regular basis to those. And the crocs.

Access is by 4 wheel drive and wooden canoe only, absolutely totally terrifying when you factor in the rocks, rapids and hippos.

No electricity, (plenty of running water!) , no mobile phones (it's radio only in that part of the world). Hot showers mind you (Brilliant arrangement, oil drum boiler, bucket, rope)

Cool place though.

I'm going to email my mate in Namibia, he might actually be interested (Would even consider a stake myself if he is). He said they'd run out of cash and closed down when I saw him a few months ago.

It's a very hard business to run (he managed similar places in the Okavango delta a few years back), government rules and regs make it even harder.

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I visited them in 1963. It was still Rhodesia in those days but IIRC they were called the Zimbabwe ruins even then. Quite an eerie place as I remember but nothing like as spooky as the Matopos, where CJ Rhodes was buried. There are definitely things that we humans do not fully understand about our earth. Nothing to do with Rhodes, it is just a very strange area.

p-o-p

Cecil John Rhodes, PC, DCL, (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902[1]) was a British-born South African businessman, mining magnate, and politician. He was the founder of the diamond company De Beers, which today markets 60% of the world's rough diamonds and at one time marketed 90%. He was an ardent believer in colonialism and was the coloniser of the state of Rhodesia, which was named after him. Rhodesia, later Northern and Southern Rhodesia, eventually became Zambia and Zimbabwe respectively

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cecil_Rhodes

Rhodes-Milner Round Table Groups

The Groups were designed to promulgate the idea of the formation of a Federal World Government, based on the unification of the British Empire and the United States of America. How successful they were in achieving this can be debated. Certainly they were successful in creating a central bank in the United States which increased British influence on U.S. economic affairs because of the connections between the Bank of England and Wall Street banks. It can be argued that they set the blueprint for future organisations such as the Royal Institute of International Affairs, the Council on Foreign Relations, the United Nations, the Trilateral Commission, and The Bilderberg Group

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhodes-Milner...nd_Table_Groups

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Keeping on topic by moving a few hundred miles northwest !? Like it!

I confess. I spent much of yesterday wasting hours looking at an area probably larger than the UK. Botswana seems to have quite a lot going for it now. Granted, 95% is uninhabitable but the remaining 5%? Not bad at all.

Cecil John Rhodes, PC, DCL, (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902[1]) was a British-born South African businessman, mining magnate, and politician. He was the founder of the diamond company De Beers, which today markets 60% of the world's rough diamonds and at one time marketed 90%. He was an ardent believer in colonialism and was the coloniser of the state of Rhodesia, which was named after him. Rhodesia, later Northern and Southern Rhodesia, eventually became Zambia and Zimbabwe respectively

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cecil_Rhodes

Rhodes-Milner Round Table Groups

The Groups were designed to promulgate the idea of the formation of a Federal World Government, based on the unification of the British Empire and the United States of America. How successful they were in achieving this can be debated. Certainly they were successful in creating a central bank in the United States which increased British influence on U.S. economic affairs because of the connections between the Bank of England and Wall Street banks. It can be argued that they set the blueprint for future organisations such as the Royal Institute of International Affairs, the Council on Foreign Relations, the United Nations, the Trilateral Commission, and The Bilderberg Group

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhodes-Milner...nd_Table_Groups

A man much admired in his time. He was ruthless.

I wonder how much of a difference a railway from Cape Town to Cairo would have changed the fortunes of Africa? Would trade have reduced conflict and poverty?

p-o-p

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Just before christmas when the Nothern Rock had its bank run. The ITN night news reported the Northern Rock bank woes but also ran a series of reports the same week from Zimbabwe showing people trying to escape zimbabwe because of the economic situation to South Africa and the attempts of the South African police to deal with the problem.

I was thinking at the time how strange to have Zimbabwe and Northern rock in the same news programme and any hidden agenda or just a coincidence .

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I confess. I spent much of yesterday wasting hours looking at an area probably larger than the UK. Botswana seems to have quite a lot going for it now. Granted, 95% is uninhabitable but the remaining 5%? Not bad at all.

p-o-p

Yeah, parts of Botswana make the Australian outback look overcrowded. Had a few adventures in the north, got a lift round Chobe with a couple of dutch blokes but got stuck in a river , trying to find our way out on foot, at dusk when we knew there were lions about was a bit worrying to say the least. I didn't find the local blacks to friendly and eventually got stopped at a road block, spent the night in a police cell ,then taken to the Zimbabwe border (Plumtree) and kicked out. My crime ? Looking like I might be a South African soldier and having green socks.

But this was all a long , long time ago. 1988 ! At that time the Botwanan Pula was the strongest currency in Africa, maybe it still is. Btw , Zambezi water is safe to drink ! I took a shower near the river and drank a lot of water at the same time (I was thirsty), when I'd finished I noticed that the water was pumped straight out of the river. No ill effects though !

I love Africa but there's one serious problem......you often seem to have to look death in the face. Everyone seems to have near death experiences....did I ever tell you about....well..maybe another time.

Other Rhodes sites are Kimberley with it's 'big hole' and his cottage at Muizenburg near Cape town. This cottage where he died is also very atmospheric . Oh dear, seems I've drifted a bit to the south.

Edited by council dweller

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My crime ? Looking like I might be a South African soldier and having green socks.

But this was all a long , long time ago. 1988 ! At that time the Botwanan Pula was the strongest currency in Africa, maybe it still is. Btw , Zambezi water is safe to drink ! I took a shower near the river and drank a lot of water at the same time (I was thirsty), when I'd finished I noticed that the water was pumped straight out of the river. No ill effects though !

I love Africa but there's one serious problem......you often seem to have to look death in the face. Everyone seems to have near death experiences....did I ever tell you about....well..maybe another time.

Other Rhodes sites are Kimberley with it's 'big hole' and his cottage at Muizenburg near Cape town. This cottage where he died is also very atmospheric . Oh dear, seems I've drifted a bit to the south.

It was the green socks. I hope you didn't have your comb stuck in one.

Looking out your window this evening, wouldn't you prefer a decent sunset, plucking duiweltjies out of your green socks, and a couple of castles whilst waiting for the braai?

Are you old enough to remember Sullivans Root beer from Kimberley?

You can't be far from Rhodes anyway, he was a Bishops Stortford boy.

p-o-p

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Don't they still have that rule you can't take any currency out of the country.

Even if that's the case, people of clue should be able to see easy ways to get around such rules quite legally.

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  • 292 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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