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"food Prices Up, Energy Prices Up" Radio 4 Pm Now

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Now.

Food and energy...

serious storm clouds are gathering

"World's food crisis could affect us before climate change!"

Buy those baked bean tins now!

Edited by The Last Bear

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Now.

Food and energy...

serious storm clouds are gathering

"World's food crisis could affect us before climate change!"

Buy those baked bean tins now!

Seems while we were watching the housing/credit bubble, food prices and supplies are about to bite us in the backside. :blink:

edited: added a comma

Edited by rover2000

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Seems while we were watching the housing/credit bubble, food prices and supplies are about to bite us in the backside. :blink:

edited: added a comma

That's what we like to see, quality punctuation!

First one to find the use of an Oxford comma in the sentence "The government has no idea how high food and energy prices could climb and that goes for council tax too!" wins a date with a page 3 girl or page 7 fella at their local Bernie Inn.

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Guest Steve Cook

The first time I have heard them actually address the looming energy crisis in terms that deal with the proper issues.

They didn't quite use the words "peak energy". Almost, but not quite....

Not enough energy.....not enough land....not enough food to go round....too many people.

I guarantee that "peak energy" will be on everyone's lips a year from now.

The cat is about to be let out of the bag.

The elephant in the corner of the room is about to be acknowledged.

Edited by Steve Cook

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Now.

Food and energy...

serious storm clouds are gathering

"World's food crisis could affect us before climate change!"

Buy those baked bean tins now!

There will be consumable price hyperinflation and asset price hyperdeflation. In the near future you will be able to buy a house in exchange for a week's supply of food.

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Guest Steve Cook
There will be consumable price hyperinflation and asset price hyperdeflation. In the near future you will be able to buy a house in exchange for a week's supply of food.

That just about sums it up perfectly......

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Now.

Food and energy...

serious storm clouds are gathering

"World's food crisis could affect us before climate change!"

Buy those baked bean tins now!

Potatoes are chitting nicely and will be glad of the storm clouds later....when the beans are eaten can then sell the tin for scrap. ;)

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That's what we like to see, quality punctuation!

First one to find the use of an Oxford comma in the sentence "The government has no idea how high food and energy prices could climb and that goes for council tax too!" wins a date with a page 3 girl or page 7 fella at their local Bernie Inn.

"The government has no idea how high food and energy prices could climb, and that goes for council tax too!"

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Indeed yes. That news has been slowly filtering into the conversation about economic over here on the USA side of the Atlantic as well. One factor adding to the trouble in food prices is the use of corn [a primary food and feed grain] to make alcohol for running autos. In fact, state governments have made laws requiring the use of alcohol in gas mixtures and also using tax dollars to subsidize it cost of production. It actually uses nearly as much energy to make as it yields in energy.

In short, this policy is short sighted and people will starve in the third world as a result. :(

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Potatoes are chitting nicely and will be glad of the storm clouds later....when the beans are eaten can then sell the tin for scrap. ;)

My potatoes are also coming along nicely and the leeks are just pushing up now too. Nothing doing with the parsnips, carrots and beetroot yet though (parsnips are notoriously slow at germinating though).

Planted an apricot tree yesterday to keep the 3 apple, 2 pear, 2 plum and cherry trees company.

I'm going to make a concerted effort to maximise yield from the allotment this year. I shall consider it a sin if I have a bare patch of earth for more than one day.

I have to say when I heard the program I thought it was extremely worrying. Better buy that couple of acres in Brittany now!

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The elephant in the corner of the room is about to be acknowledged.

If you don't talk to the elephant it amuses itself by running up a huge bill on trunk calls. Sadly, they never forget who they have to phone.

There will be consumable price hyperinflation and asset price hyperdeflation. In the near future you will be able to buy a house in exchange for a week's supply of food.

That sort of food price value can already be true if you shop at Waitrose.

Potatoes are chitting nicely and will be glad of the storm clouds later....when the beans are eaten can then sell the tin for scrap. ;)

Metals have I think doubled in price in past year, something like that anyway.

"The government has no idea how high food and energy prices could climb, and that goes for council tax too!"

Correct, we have a winner ladies & gentlemen. Your date with Tina, 19, Tottenham or hairy Dave, 24, Dartford - is on its way. Your fried mushrooms and steak are on the griddle.

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Food has never been cheaper as a proportion of income. Agriculture has been mothballed in the UK for three decades, same for many developed nations. The industry is behind the curve.

Up to 50% of the food we buy we throw away. Supermarkets throw away food because the packaging is defective.

The majority of cereals are fed to farm animals. This loses 80% of the energy content of the food. I know, I keep pigs!

So, expect;

consumers to be less wasteful

meat to become very expensive, like it was in the old days!

the obesity crisis to be a transitional novelty of the last days of the commodities bear.

cancer rates to fall.

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My potatoes are also coming along nicely and the leeks are just pushing up now too. Nothing doing with the parsnips, carrots and beetroot yet though (parsnips are notoriously slow at germinating though).

Planted an apricot tree yesterday to keep the 3 apple, 2 pear, 2 plum and cherry trees company.

I'm going to make a concerted effort to maximise yield from the allotment this year. I shall consider it a sin if I have a bare patch of earth for more than one day.

I have to say when I heard the program I thought it was extremely worrying. Better buy that couple of acres in Brittany now!

Our leeks are also doing fine, trying to plan ahead and will replace more of the flowers for growing food. Would be ironic if in the future, land growing food is worth more than land for building bricks. ;)

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I heard this as well, the advisor said that we in the UK can produce 60% of the food we consume here in the UK.

I was suprised it was this much. However he said food is a commodity market which I took to mean food goes to those who can afford it, so not necessarily the UK. Which it then occurred to me that imagine food prices got so high that only 10% of the UK could afford to buy it and the rest was exported. The indigenous population would try to obtain it my any means

necessary rather than starve, and the farms and food processing and transport would be protected by police or private security firms.

I guess thats what they really mean when they talk about food security.

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I heard this as well, the advisor said that we in the UK can produce 60% of the food we consume here in the UK.

I was suprised it was this much. However he said food is a commodity market which I took to mean food goes to those who can afford it, so not necessarily the UK. Which it then occurred to me that imagine food prices got so high that only 10% of the UK could afford to buy it and the rest was exported. The indigenous population would try to obtain it my any means

necessary rather than starve, and the farms and food processing and transport would be protected by police or private security firms.

I guess thats what they really mean when they talk about food security.

Considering that most of the population are fat f*cks I think 60% should be more than sufficient.

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Food has never been cheaper as a proportion of income. Agriculture has been mothballed in the UK for three decades, same for many developed nations. The industry is behind the curve.

Up to 50% of the food we buy we throw away. Supermarkets throw away food because the packaging is defective.

The majority of cereals are fed to farm animals. This loses 80% of the energy content of the food. I know, I keep pigs!

So, expect;

consumers to be less wasteful

meat to become very expensive, like it was in the old days!

the obesity crisis to be a transitional novelty of the last days of the commodities bear.

cancer rates to fall.

Yes cancer rates should fall if less meats are consumed, particularly processed/smoked from what I've read on the subject. Of course obesity is a factor in cancer and diabetes. And yes, i know, I date pigs!

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"The government has no idea how high food and energy prices could climb, and that goes for council tax too!"

Damn. beat me to it.

Who you gonna chose to accompany you to the Bernie Inn?

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They're changing allotment rules so market gardens can have them.

Unfair if you want one and it's all being used by people to sell you veg.

And Oldham are looking at putting up fees to £250 a year rather than 25 quid

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So, expect;

consumers to be less wasteful

meat to become very expensive, like it was in the old days!

the obesity crisis to be a transitional novelty of the last days of the commodities bear.

cancer rates to fall.

On the cancer and obesity rate you will most likely be wrong because carbohydrates will stay cheap whilst healthy stuff will get very expensive, and malnutrition will also rear it's ugly head. Feedwise, people are a little bit pickier than pigs, but not much, as long as you add enough colouration, sugar and flavour they'll wolf if down if you only train them young enough to eat the swill.

For those who don't have a farm, learning how to keep meat bunnies is probably a good move, they are cuddly and nutritious, plus you can feed them for next to nothing.

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On the cancer and obesity rate you will most likely be wrong because carbohydrates will stay cheap whilst healthy stuff will get very expensive, and malnutrition will also rear it's ugly head. Feedwise, people are a little bit pickier than pigs, but not much, as long as you add enough colouration, sugar and flavour they'll wolf if down if you only train them young enough to eat the swill.

For those who don't have a farm, learning how to keep meat bunnies is probably a good move, they are cuddly and nutritious, plus you can feed them for next to nothing.

...and a good source of protein.

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For those who don't have a farm, learning how to keep meat bunnies is probably a good move, they are cuddly and nutritious, plus you can feed them for next to nothing.

I was breeding giant whites twenty years ago. Never again!

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Guest Bart of Darkness
My potatoes are also coming along nicely and the leeks are just pushing up now too. Nothing doing with the parsnips, carrots and beetroot yet though (parsnips are notoriously slow at germinating though).

If things were to get really bad, wouldn't there be a lot more pilfering from allotments?

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If things were to get really bad, wouldn't there be a lot more pilfering from allotments?

Guilty! (very hungry student)

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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