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Inspired by the woodland thread...

The missus and I had a rather long conversation the other night about being debt/rent free and basically being in a position where as much of the money we earn stays in our pocket rather than going to some greedy bank/landlord etc.

As a part of all of this, the idea of living in a Yurt came up. For those who don't know a Yurt is a traditional Mongolian dwelling made up of a felt or canvas cover stretched over a wooden lattice frame. Here's a traditional Mongolian one being put up:

800px-Yurt-construction-3.JPG

Basically about 10 grand or so will get you a 30ft diameter Yurt, all ready to move in. Entertainingly this is also substantially larger than the typical first time buyer 2 bed hovel flat which has become so popular in recent times.

Some of these also look pretty nice inside:

yurt.jpg

yurt4.jpg

What I wanted to know is if anybody has any experience of living in this kind of thing? Can anybody tell me anything about evading the council planning department? As I understand it you can live in the thing for up to six months in the year with pretty much no planning permission, but any longer than that and it's classed as a permanent dwelling. Would it be possible to simply move the whole thing to an adjacent field after the six months were up and avoid any planning issues? Are there any other dodges which might let you keep the thing there permanently/

Any info much appreciated.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

I like the idea of these too. I seem to remember there is a place in north Dorset where you can buy them too.

Edited by DissipatedYouthIsValuable

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I like the idea of these too. I seem to remember there is a place in north Dorset where you can buy them too.

There are actually loads of places on the internet where you can buy them, and yes most are in the westcountry (oo-aar).

To be honest I can see a load of, shall we say challanges to be overcome in living in one, but at the end of the day I'd rather pay 10 grand for a yurt plus, say, £50k for a field than spend the rest of my life being a debt slave just to get a 2 bed flat here:

SABTN140095B.JPG

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Inspired by the woodland thread...

The missus and I had a rather long conversation the other night about being debt/rent free and basically being in a position where as much of the money we earn stays in our pocket rather than going to some greedy bank/landlord etc.

As a part of all of this, the idea of living in a Yurt came up. For those who don't know a Yurt is a traditional Mongolian dwelling made up of a felt or canvas cover stretched over a wooden lattice frame. Here's a traditional Mongolian one being put up:

800px-Yurt-construction-3.JPG

Basically about 10 grand or so will get you a 30ft diameter Yurt, all ready to move in. Entertainingly this is also substantially larger than the typical first time buyer 2 bed hovel flat which has become so popular in recent times.

Some of these also look pretty nice inside:

yurt.jpg

yurt4.jpg

What I wanted to know is if anybody has any experience of living in this kind of thing? Can anybody tell me anything about evading the council planning department? As I understand it you can live in the thing for up to six months in the year with pretty much no planning permission, but any longer than that and it's classed as a permanent dwelling. Would it be possible to simply move the whole thing to an adjacent field after the six months were up and avoid any planning issues? Are there any other dodges which might let you keep the thing there permanently/

Any info much appreciated.

wow...nice.

Read an article ages ago about a new-agey Tamsin and Tarquin couple living full time in a yurt but I think they were at the bottom of Tamsin's mummy's garden, a few acres or so.

Might be a bit chilly in the winter round my way though,,,,,

Edited by Mancghirl

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
wow...nice.

Read an article ages ago about a new-agey Tamsin and Tarquin couple living full time in a yurt but I think they were at the bottom of Tamsin's mummy garden, a few acres or so.

Might be a bit chilly in the winter round my way though,,,,,

Just make sure you have plenty of furs.

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10K for the yurt, but how much for the land?

Those pics look great, but unfortunately in this country people are actively prevented from creating their own homes. I'd jump at the chance to live in one, but I know the law would never allow it.

If you get any more details though, I'd be very interested to read.

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wow...nice.

Read an article ages ago about a new-agey Tamsin and Tarquin couple living full time in a yurt but I think they were at the bottom of Tamsin's mummy garden, a few acres or so.

Might be a bit chilly in the winter round my way though,,,,,

I've read they can be surprisingly warm. The shape is nearly ideal from a thermal insulation point of view (a sphere would be better but that's hard to build ;)) and if people can survive a Mongolian winter in one then I reckon it'd cope even up North.

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10K for the yurt, but how much for the land?

Those pics look great, but unfortunately in this country people are actively prevented from creating their own homes. I'd jump at the chance to live in one, but I know the law would never allow it.

If you get any more details though, I'd be very interested to read.

Well this is what I'm trying to work out. As far as I can tell you're allowed to put one up for six months without any kind of planning permission. Given that it takes about a weekend to take it all apart and put it back together again, you could always just shuffle it back and forth between adjacent fields.

Apparently if you can show you've been living on the land for more than four years without any complaints then you can stay there for good too.

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Inspired by the woodland thread...

The missus and I had a rather long conversation the other night about being debt/rent free and basically being in a position where as much of the money we earn stays in our pocket rather than going to some greedy bank/landlord etc.

As a part of all of this, the idea of living in a Yurt came up. For those who don't know a Yurt is a traditional Mongolian dwelling made up of a felt or canvas cover stretched over a wooden lattice frame. Here's a traditional Mongolian one being put up:

800px-Yurt-construction-3.JPG

Basically about 10 grand or so will get you a 30ft diameter Yurt, all ready to move in. Entertainingly this is also substantially larger than the typical first time buyer 2 bed hovel flat which has become so popular in recent times.

Some of these also look pretty nice inside:

yurt.jpg

yurt4.jpg

What I wanted to know is if anybody has any experience of living in this kind of thing? Can anybody tell me anything about evading the council planning department? As I understand it you can live in the thing for up to six months in the year with pretty much no planning permission, but any longer than that and it's classed as a permanent dwelling. Would it be possible to simply move the whole thing to an adjacent field after the six months were up and avoid any planning issues? Are there any other dodges which might let you keep the thing there permanently/

Any info much appreciated.

I know somone who lived in a TeePee in malvern for a few years, he moved into rented in the winter to keep warm. He is a good friend of a friend, an arty with a couple of dogs. He basically decided to opt out from life and do casual work, the teepee suited his lifestyle, the guy was due to inherit alot of money and could quite easily buy a house cash but he liked the idea of moving his house in his old car and did jobs for farmers when he needed money. He pitched in farmers fields near malvern, asking farmers permission first and often paying them a couple of quid a night so he could use there water, wood etc etc. He had a wood burning stove to keep it warm and a computer at one point ;p

Its a good idea, but only if you like moving alot, your going to get complaints within a week or so if you stay in one place and you will be moved by the council. IMHO its not a massivley cheap option, it is cheaper to rent a room in a shared house..

Edited by moosetea

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I have a plot of land close to the sea and I was thinking about putting there either a caravan or a Yurt, to use as a holiday dwelling. Could someone perhaps explain the pros and cons of each solution. What about plumbing, sewerage, etc

Penny Pound

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I've read they can be surprisingly warm. The shape is nearly ideal from a thermal insulation point of view (a sphere would be better but that's hard to build ;)) and if people can survive a Mongolian winter in one then I reckon it'd cope even up North.

Of course! Mongolia's pretty chilly, eh? I've seen pics before and they look lovely inside.

Not sure what the 'living full time' rules are, though. Depends on where you intend putting it. Aren't there rules about temporary dewllings (e.g static caravan sites) that you can only live there part of the year? Not sure if yurts would fall into the same type of category.

Edited by Mancghirl

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Anyone any idea of costings for this?

Well a bit of woodland to put it on will is relatively cheap (example) and you're allowed to stay there for up to half the year. Planning permission for the Yurt itself is not (AFAIK) needed because in essence it's a big tent but permission is needed to live on the site permanently.

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I've always fancied one of these to live in. Wouldn't take too long to buy it up, you tend to live near the best local boozers well. No problems with being moved on, as long as you've paid your mooring.

I reckon it's doable in 10 years comfortably for me.

An ex-colleague had a barge she bought for 30k, and moored it up in Kings Cross Basin :-)

http://www.boatstogo.co.uk/narrowboats-20-...at-sales-2.html

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I've always fancied one of these to live in. Wouldn't take too long to buy it up, you tend to live near the best local boozers well. No problems with being moved on, as long as you've paid your mooring.

I reckon it's doable in 10 years comfortably for me.

An ex-colleague had a barge she bought for 30k, and moored it up in Kings Cross Basin :-)

http://www.boatstogo.co.uk/narrowboats-20-...at-sales-2.html

We actually looked into living on a houseboat a little while ago. The biggest problem with them was that mooring fees were about £400 a month which when you take into account the cost of buying the boat as well starts to be a little pointless.

Disturbingly there also seems to be a thriving houseboat flipping industry as well. Basically you buy up an old scottish fishing trawler, add laminate flooring and magnolia paint (I kid you not) and sell it for £200-300k.

What really annoys me about the whole thing is that it feels like whatever you do you end up getting shafted somehow. Given that I don't want to be suffering from a mountain of debt my whole life, emmigration is currently looking the best option.

Edit:

Dear God they're letting the things out as well now:

http://houseboats.apolloduck.co.uk/feature.phtml?id=70643

£775 a month, but at least it's got laminate flooring.

Edited by ImA20SomethingGetMeOutOfHere

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Guest Skint Academic
Well a bit of woodland to put it on will is relatively cheap (example) and you're allowed to stay there for up to half the year. Planning permission for the Yurt itself is not (AFAIK) needed because in essence it's a big tent but permission is needed to live on the site permanently.

Couldn't you buy two bits of land and move between the two semi-annually?

I have to say that this idea of a yurt has caught my attention too! I remember watching Grand Designs where they had this carpenter bloke create a hexagonal house completely out of wood. It was beautiful.

How easy is it to move a yurt? Or do you just keep it in one place but only live there for half a year? I wonder if they would be warm enough for a scottish winter. But then could you have a yurt inside a yurt?

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
There are actually loads of places on the internet where you can buy them, and yes most are in the westcountry (oo-aar).

To be honest I can see a load of, shall we say challanges to be overcome in living in one, but at the end of the day I'd rather pay 10 grand for a yurt plus, say, £50k for a field than spend the rest of my life being a debt slave just to get a 2 bed flat here:

SABTN140095B.JPG

That is definitely going to be repurposed as a prison.

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We actually looked into living on a houseboat a little while ago. The biggest problem with them was that mooring fees were about £400 a month which when you take into account the cost of buying the boat as well starts to be a little pointless.

Disturbingly there also seems to be a thriving houseboat flipping industry as well. Basically you buy up an old scottish fishing trawler, add laminate flooring and magnolia paint (I kid you not) and sell it for £200-300k.

What really annoys me about the whole thing is that it feels like whatever you do you end up getting shafted somehow. Given that I don't want to be suffering from a mountain of debt my whole life, emmigration is currently looking the best option.

Edit:

Dear God they're letting the things out as well now:

http://houseboats.apolloduck.co.uk/feature.phtml?id=70643

£775 a month, but at least it's got laminate flooring.

I've got a feeling that there's going to be a boom in residential mooring availability "oop north", I wouldn't need a mahoosive houseboat anyway. Just a nice narrowboat, fully paid for, where I could bugger off to and pottle about in summer, and maybe work 6 months of the year over winter would do it. Don't think an overwinter lock up mooring would be that expensive.

My ex-colleagure took her boat down from Ellesmere Port using the canal system to get to London.

Maybe we could stick the Yurt on deck :-)

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Couldn't you buy two bits of land and move between the two semi-annually?

I have to say that this idea of a yurt has caught my attention too! I remember watching Grand Designs where they had this carpenter bloke create a hexagonal house completely out of wood. It was beautiful.

How easy is it to move a yurt? Or do you just keep it in one place but only live there for half a year? I wonder if they would be warm enough for a scottish winter. But then could you have a yurt inside a yurt?

I think it would be worth it simply because it would annoy the council so much. I can imagine it now. Council spends ages taking you to court, getting eviction papers drawn up etc. A long legal battle ensues and eventually the yurt has to go. On the day the baliffs turn up the yurt has finally gone, only to reappear in the field next door, meaning that they have to start all over again.

From what I understand, a basic yurt can be dismantled, moved and reassembled over a weekend. Bear in mind that they were originally designed for nomads. If it can't be carried by a Yak it gets left behind. Obviously if you start adding sofas and kitchen cupboards then it gets a little more complicated.

If you look at this you can see a bit about how they're put together. The wall itself is not just a single layer of canvas like a tent, it's built up of multiple layers, including one layer of felt. Given that the Mongolians have been living in them for millenia, and given that it's a bit nippy there in the winter, I reckon a good one would cope with a winter here or even in scotland.

Edited by ImA20SomethingGetMeOutOfHere

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  • 297 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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