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cartimandua51

School Places By Lottery

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Just been watching the news- apparently "good" schools command a premium of up to 20% on house prices in their catchment area.If more LAs follow Brighton's lead and allocate places by lottery this premium will presumably vanish like the morning dew, all helping to reduce average prices.

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Just been watching the news- apparently "good" schools command a premium of up to 20% on house prices in their catchment area.If more LAs follow Brighton's lead and allocate places by lottery this premium will presumably vanish like the morning dew, all helping to reduce average prices.

I am probably wrong but with this lottery method I was under the impression that this applies to the original catchment area.

They were going to abolish the rule of nearest the school gate as the crow flies and all people in the area stand the same chance of entry.

Was supposed to deter people from buying or renting on the schools doorstep thus denying a local child a place.

??? :unsure:

Edited by boshdadosh

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Just been watching the news- apparently "good" schools command a premium of up to 20% on house prices in their catchment area.If more LAs follow Brighton's lead and allocate places by lottery this premium will presumably vanish like the morning dew, all helping to reduce average prices.

I have a sneaky suspicion that this lottery idea will not become widespread. There will be too many noisy middle class people making a racket about it for it to take off.

Its amusing though that people will complain about having spent extra on a house in a good catchment area as if purely having more money than someone else should guarantee their children a better education than other people.

I'm pretty sure that if I'd been growing up today I may not have excelled at school like I did. I was lucky enough to be kid from a working class family in the days of the 11+ as a result I got a good start at a grammar school. My parents would not have been rich enough to move to a good school area.

I'm not advocating a return to the old system, but they threw out the baby with the bathwater with comprehensivisation, and adding this 'choice' has stymied the smart and poor.

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I'm pretty sure that if I'd been growing up today I may not have excelled at school like I did. I was lucky enough to be kid from a working class family in the days of the 11+ as a result I got a good start at a grammar school. My parents would not have been rich enough to move to a good school area.

Same here! With all these Government targets and tests, National Curriculum, Citizenship, etc, the teachers would not have time to teach and I would not have had time to learn

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I am probably wrong but with this lottery method I was under the impression that this applies to the original catchment area.

They were going to abolish the rule of nearest the school gate as the crow flies and all people in the area stand the same chance of entry.

Was supposed to deter people from buying or renting on the schools doorstep thus denying a local child a place.

??? :unsure:

I don't know either, but however they draw the catchment area lines (presumably gerrymandering them to include poor as well as middle-class area) there are going to be some VERY pissed-off parents who'd invested in a house 5 yards from the school!

Will take time for any effect to filter though, though, as presumably the principle of not splitting up siblings will still apply...

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Will take time for any effect to filter though, though, as presumably the principle of not splitting up siblings will still apply...

Apparently not. Some LA's are supposedly trying to phase it out soon.

Buying/Renting in catchment until No.1 has a place and then moving to a cheaper area is one of the oldest tricks in the book.

There are a few of things that annoy me about this whole lottery thing.

Isn't it going against all the environmental/obesity/congestion concerns to have children commuting in from all over the place rather than being 5 minutes walk away.

What if your children are at different schools at primary level, how do you get them to school on time if one is walking distance and the other 5 miles away. Do you end up applying for a transfer for the first one.

What about the transport costs of those poorer families who now have to travel further because they got lucky in the lottery.

Surely LA's are going to see a huge increase in applications for in year transfers to the desirable schools, as places become available - more upheaval for the children involved.

How are the primary schools going to be able to form a relationship with the school that the majority of their kids feed into, when their pupils might now be going all over the place rather than the school down the road.

They should be concentrating on making sure every school is up to scratch, then there would be no need for any of this NuLab b**l**ks.

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The "problem" is a failing education system, not the middle class parents who are able to extract the best out of it. Their children do not get an unfair advantage, but rather less of a disadvantage than children who go to lower ranked schools.

A radical overhaul is required. The school voucher system may be on its way after the election, a system that has been a success in Sweden:

http://www.spectator.co.uk/the-magazine/fe...evolution.thtml

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The "problem" is a failing education system, not the middle class parents who are able to extract the best out of it. Their children do not get an unfair advantage, but rather less of a disadvantage than children who go to lower ranked schools.

A radical overhaul is required. The school voucher system may be on its way after the election, a system that has been a success in Sweden:

http://www.spectator.co.uk/the-magazine/fe...evolution.thtml

In a way, I agree with school vouchers - but I fear that it will just end up with more polarisation and even less mobility. Private schools and the best state schools will be filled with middle class people who can afford to top up their voucher with a little of their own money or buy a nice house in a nice area. Poorer parents will not be able to do that and their kids will still end up in a bad state schools.

Vouchers cannot bring choice unless the voucher is really worth a significant amount - say around £2,000 per term - which allows someone on fairly modest means to pay a little extra and get into a decent local private school (but not Eton or Harrow obviously).

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It makes me laugh watching New Labour tie themselves up in knots about "opening up" access to "good schools".

They are "good" because of the kids that go to them:

If you have a school made up mainly of well-behaved children from homes where parents read books to them, and who generally behave well and want to learn, and very few disruptive kids, hey presto, you have a "good school". On the other hand, if you have a school with a high percentage of disruptive and badly-behaved (and generally less smart) kids, teaching becomes all but impossible.

You can't make access to "good schools" fairer without destroying them in the process.

What Labour actually want is to spread the nice clever kids thinly around all the schools in the hope that they will compensate for the rowdy, hard-to-teach kids.

They effectively don't want the middle-class parents to find any way of populating a school mainly with THEIR kids, but they dare not come right out and say "we need your kids to try to drag the average up across the board, and we will do anything we can to prevent you from having a school with lots of nice kids."

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I think potentially making more car journeys[1] inevitable is terrible. But I suspect some social engineering will be going on in the background.

The government needs fluid integration to start happening now to bring about the social cohesion they want for our multicultural society.

If in what I perhaps wrongly assume to be white middle class Brighton there won't be any noticable ethnic groups split up or mixed round then they will after a year or so have a validly tested "by lottery" school system which allows them to move it out to the rest of the Uk where they will be able to mix up schools so that they're not predominantly any one race or colour.

[1] I know for some kids there's no direct bus to school but this is a reason for ensuring public transport works as well as ensuring kids grow up with the social skills needed to function in real life.

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Will end up in lawsuits so will not happen. 4x4s mowing down teachers at schoolgates and all that.

School run = women in oversized 4x4s they can't control and can't drive....just makes me crack up, it takes all sorts to make the world go around. ;)

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It makes me laugh watching New Labour tie themselves up in knots about "opening up" access to "good schools".

They are "good" because of the kids that go to them:

...

Well said - my thoughts exactly. If you swapped all the kids between a "good school" and "bad school" within an instant their status would flip...

crude.

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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