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Hpc Came To A Hold Around Here


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It looked all so promising..put it all started again..houses selling again left and right in short times...I'm loosing my passions and want to shout out to everybody"stop buying houses"..but its like business like usual for most around here.

I don't get it :blink:

Its the Northwood/ Pinner area..

I totally agree. In September I went to see a house that I thought was hugely overvalued (imo). It had been brough less than a year ago, new build for 475k. It had been on the market for months at 580k. In the end I made an offer of 570k on the 580 asking price. It was accepted, but I pulled out of the sale. The house next door came on the market last week for 580. Its slightly smaller all round. I went to see it this week-end (Sunday). Just had a call for EA...full asking price already on the table (ie within 1 week of going to market). This all points to the housing market re-igniting to me.

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Monopoly, I am seeing the same here. Most people have not even heard of the credit crunch and certainly have not the remotest interest they might buy a property that falls in value. Life goes on and all that.

As I said in another post - I don't think it's statistically correct to use your rich BTL friends and posh mates as a fair reflection of the population as a whole.

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Wow, just had a mild statement removed - first time since comming here from 2004+

So its ok for users to describe bullish types as sheeple, or numpty investors, but not ok to make a humourous remark on some pessimists spending habits.

Wow

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Wow, just had a mild statement removed - first time since comming here from 2004+

So its ok for users to describe bullish types as sheeple, or numpty investors, but not ok to make a humourous remark on some pessimists spending habits.

Wow

Yeah, I was a bit taken aback by that. You post some cr@p, but it's not particularly offensive, just badly thought-through.

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Very convincing anecdotal, Dogbox, very convincing.

Which most people would that be, then?

The ones who queued around the block at Northern Rock or the other ones who just watched the footage on TV?

I suspect that the Hertfordshire housewives you speak to when you and your brothers go round to wash the windows don't really fancy shooting the breeze with you about the economy.

I think DogBox is right. I rabbit on to some of my mates ( most of whom in the public sector ) and they have no idea how bad it is. I think this is true for a sizeable portion of the population, esp those who are in the public sector and think about annual inflation adjusted pay scales etc. I however work in a global industry, where competition is fierce. A payrise needs to be justified through increased performance/productivity, and even then its below inflation.

This significant portion of the population are not bullish or bearish. They are non participants. They go forward buying that house or car, providing a floor to prices. They are completely unaware of the malestrome (excuse spelling) that is surrounding us. Only when these market participants are forced to take a bullish or bearish position, will we see the true state of the market. I think what Dogbox is saying is actually a bearish signal. For once that support sees just how many problems this country has, they will behave in a more rational and informed way. They will reduce risk, and leverage. Just a thought.

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I think DogBox is right. I rabbit on to some of my mates ( most of whom in the public sector ) and they have no idea how bad it is. I think this is true for a sizeable portion of the population, esp those who are in the public sector and think about annual inflation adjusted pay scales etc. I however work in a global industry, where competition is fierce. A payrise needs to be justified through increased performance/productivity, and even then its below inflation.

This significant portion of the population are not bullish or bearish. They are non participants. They go forward buying that house or car, providing a floor to prices. They are completely unaware of the malestrome (excuse spelling) that is surrounding us. Only when these market participants are forced to take a bullish or bearish position, will we see the true state of the market. I think what Dogbox is saying is actually a bearish signal. For once that support sees just how many problems this country has, they will behave in a more rational and informed way. They will reduce risk, and leverage. Just a thought.

I was in a sales pitch meeting for some marketing-related services this month. The agency stood up and said that we will need to rethink our strategy in light of the difficult economic conditions in 2008.

We hadn't prompted this in our tender documents. Everyone around the table nodded sagely.

If the marketing department have heard there's a slowdown, it must have happened f***** ages ago.

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I was in a sales pitch meeting for some marketing-related services this month. The agency stood up and said that we will need to rethink our strategy in light of the difficult economic conditions in 2008.

We hadn't prompted this in our tender documents. Everyone around the table nodded sagely.

If the marketing department have heard there's a slowdown, it must have happened f***** ages ago.

Now I think your talking about a real business that needs to make something called a profit, and is actually accountable to its shareholders/owners. How many people work in the public sector or are dependant on it? Its a pretty big chunk. I would guess 20% of the market participants 'think' they are in a 'recession proof' job and have had nice pay rises and bonues (targetted against what I dont know - maybe spending their budget on time). These are the oblivious bafoons that I talk of.

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There are broadly two types of personality in this conversation.

One type I would say make up the bulk of the population. They might at best have a vague notion of the credit crunch. They simply are'nt calibrated to give over thought to timing, or whether they might be better waiting before they buy.

What they do drives the economy.

Type two, a much smaller proportion will give a lot of thought to timing and trying to minimise the loss of status tickets (money).

They will be more inclined to sense danger, which can be a good traite but is easily bastardised by an over active capacity to imagine loss.

I was not intending to be offensive on the restaurant bill comment, just accurate. Perhaps I've misread people, but I do have a sense that people in category one would be more inclined to split a restaurant bill evenly whereas those in group 2 might be more given to settling based prurely upon individual consupmtion - again to minimise 'loss'.

That all sounds like bollogs no doubt :blink:

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  • 444 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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