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Maybe It Is Not As Bad As The Bears Make Out


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Not anymore. (I would dispute whether this was ever the case. You have no evidence for your statement above that "most" ie the majority of of UK PPR puchases were or are by couples)

http://www.spiked-online.com/Articles/00000002D3A7.htm

OK, my post was incorrectly worded. I accept the demographic change, and think this change is part of the problem.

I couldn't have contemplated buying a property on my own in the 70's, and I know of absolutely no-one in my circle of friends and family who did so. Maybe this was only the case in London and the S.East.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
OK, my post was incorrectly worded. I accept the demographic change, and think this change is part of the problem.

I couldn't have contemplated buying a property on my own in the 70's, and I know of absolutely no-one in my circle of friends and family who did so. Maybe this was only the case in London and the S.East.

Yes I must agree, the first signs of single people buying in large numbers started in the 80s when the so called city whizz kids commonly known as yuppies started buying property as single people. Black Monday 1987 came and they went, that was the first time I heard the word repossession associated with the housing market. I knew a couple of people who bought as singles in the 60s, but they were professionals.

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Hi MM

    I was relatively speaking in comparison to Geometric's middle class teachers and Doctor friends. I am not far removed from the UK and wouldn't wish the benefits system upon anyone. How you can even begin to compare professional people to housing benefit tenants is beyond me. When was the last time you saw a teacher/doctor with a 'pay as you go' gas/electric meter?

KOTC.

Hmm.. a loan parent im friends with survives on 50/60 quid a week for food and extras between her and her two kids...

On the other hand she does rent a very nice modern flat in a nice area, used to work part time, (recently given that up to study), has sky tv, landline, 2 mobile phones, and a very well furnised and very well stocked cupboards. She appears to be in a better position than me, (apart from only have 50 quid a week for food and other extras).

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I've never bragged about my position, you don't even know my position, how can can you say I brag about my position if you don't even know it?

      All you know is I'm a landlord, if you class that as bragging then at the risk of being rude, you really are too sensitive to have a serious discussion with. If your friends are paying back their debts and aren't complaining about it, why bring them into the equation? In all honesty that to me, makes it sound as though  you are trying to create a problem that doesn't exist in the first place!

    You find my mockery of people having a hard time offensive. Well in reply I may say that I find your molly coddling of people who are in charge of their own futures offensive. I also find it offensive that you totally disregard the advice of someone who knows what they are talking about, and has been in the situation  than these people are currently in! As I said before as an upper middle class bank managers dtr/son you are hardly the story of rags to riches are you? You're hardly the proof of the pudding that you can overcome adversity and lack of opportunity.

    Your over the top false concern (I say false because you admit yourself that your friends aren't complaining) is probably some sort of mid life middle England guilt trip rather than an honest heartfelt compassion.

    If you want to see true hardship and poverty you need to look way beyond your 'safe little circle' of teachers and doctors who can't find £500 to fix their car. Try looking at the single mother who is looking for her next £2.00 to buy her kids dinner! That my friend is where you will see some true hardship!

KOTC.

Hmm, certainly seem to have struck a nerve here KOTC.

The people I was referring to work in public service and a factory respectively; you are making assumptions here.

I dont say that you brag of your position because I know what you do; I say this because of your posts.

Being lectured on hardship by a landlord had me laughing out loud :)

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OK, my post was incorrectly worded. I accept the demographic change, and think this change is part of the problem.

I couldn't have contemplated buying a property on my own in the 70's, and I know of absolutely no-one in my circle of friends and family who did so. Maybe this was only the case in London and the S.East.

Maybe you and all your friends had crappy jobs. I had an ordinary job as a site engineer on building sites - I bought my first 2 bed maisonnette on my own - with a 2.5 times salary in 1979. Loads of my friends and contemporaries did too. Mates who got married younger (in the early 70s) bought 2 or 3 bed terraces or semis as their first houses. Usually on a 2.5 plus 1 mortgage.

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Maybe you and all your friends had crappy jobs. I had an ordinary job as a site engineer on building sites - I bought my first 2 bed maisonnette on my own - with a 2.5 times salary in 1979. Loads of my friends and contemporaries did too. Mates who got married younger (in the early 70s) bought 2 or 3 bed terraces or semis as their first houses. Usually on a 2.5 plus 1 mortgage.

No we all had good jobs. Don't know how much you earned as a building site engineer, but in 1975 I was an electrical power design engineer on more than average salary. My brothers were/are builders and couldn't afford to buy until their late 20s, and then on joint salaries. Perhaps you lived in a crappy area

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  • 441 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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