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Bingley Bloke

High Council Tax Means Can't Afford To Rent Either!

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I was looking at a couple of rental apartments - Both two-bed, both about £600/month. In every respect they are ideal for me... except for the council tax which is band F! How on earth can a two-bed apartment fall into band F, the second highest band, when the two-bed bungalow I currently live in (with the person who owns it, but I don't get on with anymore), which is bigger and has grounds, is in band B? High house prices are preventing me from buying... high council tax is preventing me from renting!

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If you were French by now you would be running through the streets carrying the President's bloodied head followed by tens of thousands of your fellow citizens. Over here, you queue, you whinge on the Internet, you do nothing. Even the Welsh have the courage to sneak out in the middle of the night with a spray can and spray something abusive in a language no one can understand! Go on, get active, get out there, get marching, get sharpening of that guillotine! :ph34r:

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I agree 100%. Problem is... if I go marching on my own either the police are going to pick me up for jay walking or the men in white coats will get me - I'm up for a revolution if everyone else is!

On a more practical note - is it possible to appeal the council tax banding on a property you don't yet live in? I suspect these are band F because they were constructed in 1997, after the last council tax valuation, but in all fairness they should have been banded at the same level as comparitive properties that existed when the last valuation took place... but then 'fairness' and 'council tax' are not phrases you ever see sharing the same sentence!

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It sounds like the valuation office have made a mistake, you need to contact your local council tax office and ask them who you need to contact to have the flats banding reevaluated., they will give you the details, you then need to follow this through with the valuation office.

I have had to do this twice and in each time the property has been put down into the correct banding. If successful, you will recieve a rebate as will all the previous occupiers for the last 4 years but this process can take about 3months to complete.

I concur with this poster. It sounds very much like there has been a banding mistake, unless the roof is gold plated. You must instigate these proceedings within 6 months of taking up residence in the building, otherwise it becomes more difficult to get the place rebanded - after 6 months they have to admit some sort of mistake, and it requires someone in the council tax office actually knowing the law rather than the formula.

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It sounds like the valuation office have made a mistake, you need to contact your local council tax office and ask them who you need to contact to have the flats banding reevaluated., they will give you the details, you then need to follow this through with the valuation office.

I have had to do this twice and in each time the property has been put down into the correct banding. If successful, you will recieve a rebate as will all the previous occupiers for the last 4 years but this process can take about 3months to complete.

Link http://www.voa.gov.uk/council_tax/cti_home.htm

http://www.voa.gov.uk/council_tax/cti_home.htm

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There does seem to have been an error with the banding. According to the council tax web site...

"The council tax band of a property is not related to its current market value. This is because, by law, council tax valuations are based on the price a property would have fetched if it had been sold on 1 April 1991."

... but the banding of F relates to the £120,001-£160,000 value that it fell into when it sold on 10 May 2000 for £125,000 - the first recorded sale for this property as it had just been completed by the developer at that time. Clearly, being too lazy to ascertain what it would have sold for on 1 April 1991 by looking at comparable properties that were sold that year, the council bods simply decided to whack it in Band F and hope noone noticed... which they seemingly haven't... until now! By my reckoning it should be in Band B, maybe Band C at a push. To save myself the hassle of contacting the council myself I'm going to e-mail the letting angency and tell them I'm interested in renting it, but not until I am assured that the council tax banding will be fixed. It's been available for rent since 15 September so with no interest yet the letting agency might oblige my request in the hope of getting a punter.

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There does seem to have been an error with the banding. According to the council tax web site...

"The council tax band of a property is not related to its current market value. This is because, by law, council tax valuations are based on the price a property would have fetched if it had been sold on 1 April 1991."

... but the banding of F relates to the £120,001-£160,000 value that it fell into when it sold on 10 May 2000 for £125,000 - the first recorded sale for this property as it had just been completed by the developer at that time. Clearly, being too lazy to ascertain what it would have sold for on 1 April 1991 by looking at comparable properties that were sold that year, the council bods simply decided to whack it in Band F and hope noone noticed... which they seemingly haven't... until now! By my reckoning it should be in Band B, maybe Band C at a push. To save myself the hassle of contacting the council myself I'm going to e-mail the letting angency and tell them I'm interested in renting it, but not until I am assured that the council tax banding will be fixed. It's been available for rent since 15 September so with no interest yet the letting agency might oblige my request in the hope of getting a punter.

Sign on ye olde sausage roll, geezer - that way you get your council tax AND rent paid. Luvverly jubberly!! :lol:

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It is possible for a 2 bed flat to be in Band F - but only if its a good quality flat in Kensington & Chelsea or Westminster. A 2 bed flat is normally in Band D in London and the south east.

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It is possible for a 2 bed flat to be in Band F - but only if its a good quality flat in Kensington & Chelsea or Westminster. A 2 bed flat is normally in Band D in London and the south east.

My last 2 bed place in Glasgow was Band F. It was a decent enough place, but no way should it have been that high a band. I'm sure much of the country is similarly over banded, but if everyone appealed, council tax rises would have to be even higher to make up for the lost income.

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