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markinspain

Sunday Night Poll

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I hope this poll thing works as it's the first time I've tried it.

I would like to be in bonds myself but I'm stuffed by being too heavy in property and virtual cash.

I think you are missing one obvious growth sector for the next few decades...

Armaments...

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Guest muttley

I wouldn't want to be 100% in any of those assets, now or ever.

It also depends on what you mean by safe. If you mean "most likely to hold it's value" then I would say a combination of bonds and cash. If you mean "most likely to increase in value" then I would say commodities (incl gold) and shares. I would say that a combination of shares, bonds and cash was best.

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Nah - Guns and Butter....

WAR Hoooahh! what is it good for??

Actually it's very good at re-invigorating a depressed economy through the wholesale annihilation of assets.

But that does not sound as good in a song.

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I put property, but only if it is already owned.

Otherwise "liquidity" is what's important to me; to put my cash where it is most useful at the current time... and able to be extracted quickly. This excludes property for any new purchases because of the liquidity (and complete lack of value of course).

This could mean gold, or any commodity. Wheat is pretty spectacular at the moment.

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Eggs are seeing 27% growth and by Christmas shortages not seen since WWII. I am stockpiling eggs into my one and only basket as we speak.

I'm stockpiling eggs and marking them in the inventory as chickens :lol:

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Guest muttley
I'm stockpiling eggs and marking them in the inventory as chickens :lol:

I borrowed 6x my salary to invest in chickens and now they're all coming home to roost.

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One thing people don't necessarily think of is that although we have never had a "pound index" like there has been for the dollar over the last 30 years, there is the concept that the pound will potentially be very weak in relative terms over the next decade. Therefore, an asset like gold doesn't even have to appreciate in real terms for it to be a good buy - it just needs to be stable.

The pound has been around $1.40 before now as the dollar was the world's measure of wealth. If all you're doing is saving for a UK asset like a house, gold may be a good deal regardless of its absolute performance.

If you're looking for absolute wealth preservation over the next few years, that's a trickier one to answer. Gold and oil stocks? Holding interest-bearing savings in currencies of countries that are resource-rich? Who knows...

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Guest muttley
Therefore, an asset like gold doesn't even have to appreciate in real terms for it to be a good buy - it just needs to be stable.

Not just gold though. Foreign stocks would work just as well.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
Eggs are seeing 27% growth and by Christmas shortages not seen since WWII. I am stockpiling eggs into my one and only basket as we speak.

Yep, when eggs were scarce during WWII all my family kept chickens. Not only did they have a surplus to sell at high prices but had great Christmases too. :)

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I rolled a dice and I got food...Im getting quite good at this economy lark. I will now invest in whisky and dice.

You are The Dice Man and I claim my five pounds.

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Not just gold though. Foreign stocks would work just as well.

Something I heard from Puplava recently, which surprised me, was to the contrary. They do recommend Schiff's book but Europac are really built on this premise - foreign stock ownership both from a value and yield perspective. Puplava et al made a sideways comment a few weeks ago, basically saying that if there is a SM sell-off this would have repercussions around the world and foreign stock ownership wouldn't save you...

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Well not exactly a scientific poll but I´m quite surprised at the spread of votes. Just goes to show that nobody really knows what is going to happen. Should be an interesting week next week especially Tuesday evening.

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Well not exactly a scientific poll but I´m quite surprised at the spread of votes. Just goes to show that nobody really knows what is going to happen. Should be an interesting week next week especially Tuesday evening.

Quite. I'm going with the 25 basis point cut in the funds rate, which won't be enough to present a sell-off. Banks need to raise cash.

What the secondary effects of this will be I don't know. Perhaps Cgnao is correct - armageddon awaits as the hedge funds fail in style. Perhaps the dollar index falls and gold goes through the roof... who knows?

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