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There Is No Shortage Of Property In The Uk

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That correction is about to happen. With 15,353,504 UK homeowners with more rooms than needed (Travelodge homeowner research).

Basically squeeze the home owner until they have to take in a lodger and the housing shortage is solved instantly. Is this a government tactic :D:ph34r: As the Government push us to more eco friendly smaller cars will this be followed by smaller property and bigger council taxes on medium sized properties. Whole families living in two bedroom terraces could even get rebates. The green party would like it. No more building on green land. Let's all cram in to what we've got together.

mmmmm said Mr Brown who alludes to a housing crisis "how can we make that happen? Eureka the answer!!! Overcook the economy , make the rich richer, create soaring HPI and increase interest rates, make housing impossible to get mortgages for the average person, who will be thankful anyway (who needs that millstone, what they've never had they won't miss) With increased increase rates the homeowner will be thankful for a bob or two and need to us to keep our open door policy on immigration. The rich will vote for us and so will the poor as they'll have a lovely room in a nice big house, HA HA problem solved. Oh and open the flood gates wider to low paid immmigrant workers to keep pay under control. We have them by the ...........Sorry did you say that dirty word again what was it ah yes aspiration, asperation. They can aspire to their peers!! We''ll put a press clampdown on negative speeches and a newspaper articles about the economy, pump money into the economy and every whose got property now will be sitting on a mint. They'll love me for it.

Quango "But what about the immigrants Prime Minister? "

P"Uh don't bother me with detail I'm trying to run a country just get some more.. "

Q "Oh good move prime minister that will make up for all the people leaving I thought for a moment you'd lost the plot."

P " great onwards and upwards everything is soooo good,"

http://www.travelodge.co.uk/press/article.php?id=177

Over 15 million Brits own homes with more bedrooms than they need, a situation that's costing homeowners more than £20,000 each over the life of their mortgage.*

Almost half of all British homeowners (45%) cite being able to accommodate visiting friends and family as the main reason for buying an over-sized property.

However, according to a new study from Travelodge, almost a fifth of British homeowners have never had relatives or friends stay overnight and just two per cent say it happens once a week.

On average, Brits put up friends just six times a year, and relatives even more infrequently at five times. Only using a room a few times each year is an expensive habit, costing the homeowner approximately £155 each visit.

Worse still, almost one in ten (8%) British homeowners have never used their spare bedroom and over two thirds (67%) have at least one spare room that isn't slept in every night.

This relaxed attitude means six out of every ten households (58%) use their spare room simply as a space to keep junk. Other popular uses for these vacant spaces are as a study (31%), wardrobe space (10%), exercise room (3%) or TV room (3%).

Although accommodating friends and relatives is the primary reason for buying a bigger property for many homeowners, just under half (46%) say playing host is an unwelcome chore. This is reflected in the finding that more than half of all homeowners (51%) don't bother to decorate their guest rooms.

Brits' least favourite overnight guests:

1. In-laws (26%)

2. Friends with young children (21%)

3. Work colleagues (13%)

4. Mums (9%)

5. Grandparents (5%)

6. Sisters (3.2%)

7. Brothers (3%)

8. Cousins (2.5%)

9. Dads (2.3%)

10.Step brothers (2%)

Guy Parsons, Travelodge's Chief Operating Officer said; "Buying a house thats too big simply to accommodate visitors just doesn't add up, particularly when many people don't even enjoy hosting guests overnight.

"Brits' inclination toward maintaining unused spare rooms is a tremendous financial drain. If you dont have regular overnight visitors, buying a house with fewer bedrooms can make a lot of sense. Your mortgage is lighter and you can put visiting friends or family up in a hotel - everybody stays happy in the process."

Although 16% of homeowners have considered making extra cash by renting out their unoccupied bedrooms, just 2% of entrepreneurial homeowners are making the most of the opportunity to get additional income through rent.

more in article

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Brits' least favourite overnight guests:

1. In-laws (26%)

2. Friends with young children (21%)

3. Work colleagues (13%)

4. Mums (9%)

5. Grandparents (5%)

6. Sisters (3.2%)

7. Brothers (3%)

8. Cousins (2.5%)

9. Dads (2.3%)

10.Step brothers (2%)

May I suggest another one?

11. The poor sod that you've embarked on shared ownership with in order to "get on the ladder"

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PS. we are TravelLodge and can flog you a greasy cupboard that smells of dishcloths to sleep in for £70+ per night.

.

If i want a bigger house than I strictly "need" (ie maximum number of humans can I cram in per sq ft) then if I work hard enough and earn the money then I shall bl00dy well have one!!

.

Tarts.

.

ST

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Now about a decade ago at the bottom of the last slump in property there were 2.76 people per home..

2004 this had dropped to 2.6...

~So the housing supply to population was easing... (if there were any housing shortage in the UK, the situation was easing as the market boomed.)

In London, 28 out of the 33 boroughs suffered a net loss of population as a result of internal migration. The worst was Newham, in East London, which showed a net loss of almost 10,000 residents, followed by Ealing, Brent and Lambeth. London’s official population now stands at 7.5 million.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/h...icle2310435.ece

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/6958220.stm

The figures show the UK population grew to 60,587,000 - an increase of 349,000.

and we built about 200,000 more homes...

Too few for one each... But we do not need one each

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This relaxed attitude means six out of every ten households (58%) use their spare room simply as a space to keep junk. Other popular uses for these vacant spaces are as a study (31%), wardrobe space (10%), exercise room (3%) or TV room (3%).

At the moment my cats have a whole room just for their poo hut. It's even got an en-suite, not that they need anything more than their poo hut.

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Guest d23
In London, 28 out of the 33 boroughs suffered a net loss of population as a result of internal migration. The worst was Newham, in East London, which showed a net loss of almost 10,000 residents, followed by Ealing, Brent and Lambeth. London’s official population now stands at 7.5 million.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/h...icle2310435.ece

and yet the population of London still grew overall by an additional 56,000

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/6958220.stm

The figures show the UK population grew to 60,587,000 - an increase of 349,000.

and we built about 200,000 more homes...

Too few for one each... But we do not need one each

it was 185000 and I'd be interested to see if they were built where there is an actual need / the greatest need for new properties and how many old homes were torn down to build them.

UK population has grown by over 3 million since the last crash, I'd like to see how many new properties were built since then. From 1999 to 2004 there were only 140000 homes being built a year whilst 25000 were being demolished yearly (net 115,000); the slowest rate of growth in 50 years. The population of the UK is expected to grow to 65 million by 2031, so not sure the situation is going to get much better.

Now about a decade ago at the bottom of the last slump in property there were 2.76 people per home..

2004 this had dropped to 2.6...

So the population is growing quickly and yet cultural trends mean households are getting smaller. Doesn't that make the situation worse?

I don't think theres a desperate shortage of properties in the UK but I do think there are big swathes of the country where supply is a contributory factor to their levels of HPI. Not enough to prevent a correction but enough to be a contributory factor in making life harder for people looking for a reasonably priced home.

Edited by d23

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
At the moment my cats have a whole room just for their poo hut. It's even got an en-suite, not that they need anything more than their poo hut.

Will you keep your cats out of my newbuild? I'm trying to start a family in there.

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At the moment my cats have a whole room just for their poo hut. It's even got an en-suite, not that they need anything more than their poo hut.

That's truly horrid :( But then Im not a cat lover so Im biased.

Editted to add: Please dont anyone point this thread out to cells.....then again it might prove entertaining lol

Edited by stonethecrows

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Latest English housing statistics have shown that during the 12 months up to June this year, starts declined by eight per cent to 168,800 compared to the same period a year ago, while completions increased by two per cent, reaching 168,200.

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Latest English housing statistics have shown that during the 12 months up to June this year, starts declined by eight per cent to 168,800 compared to the same period a year ago, while completions increased by two per cent, reaching 168,200.

If you're talking about newbuilds kicking off then this is as good an indication as any that the housing market is slowing down-housebuilders wont start as many if they dont think they'll shift them. I expect starts to decline further from this point on.

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They're absolutely correct.

There is no shortage.

If everyone wants there own house then there would be, but this whole "cultural change" argument is b*llux.

If anything, I expect more and more people to choose to share in the future, not just for economic reasons but also for social reasons.

The pendulum always picks up speed, swings too far and then slows down and stops before it changes direction and accelerates back in the opposite direction.

We're approaching the stationary pendulum moment.

What is wrong with more sharing of cars and houses and other resources? I have no problem with it at all, in fact I think people to wake up from their brainwashed illusion of selfish acquisition of resources and remember that we came into the world with nothing, and will leave the same way.

There are far worse things in life than 2.6 people per house!

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