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Does The Uk Actually Matter?

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We're a small island dwarfed by the US, does our economy have enough swing to avoid the moves in the DOW, and its housing market? Is taking America as an example an accurate picture of what is going to happen here? Could the BOE pull something out of the hat? Could Brown do something to avoid what RB calls great crash 2? Or are we just another US state thats playing catchup?

Is it just a case of waiting for the US domino's to kick off the UKs? Then for exactly the same to happen? Then buying into the market when the US's starts to recover on its cycle?

Sorry but I'm thick as pig shit when it comes to some posts on here, but for me this is as best a plan I can hatch... :blink:

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We're a small island dwarfed by the US, does our economy have enough swing to avoid the moves in the DOW, and its housing market? Is taking America as an example an accurate picture of what is going to happen here? Could the BOE pull something out of the hat? Could Brown do something to avoid what RB calls great crash 2? Or are we just another US state thats playing catchup?

Is it just a case of waiting for the US domino's to kick off the UKs? Then for exactly the same to happen? Then buying into the market when the US's starts to recover on its cycle?

Sorry but I'm thick as pig shit when it comes to some posts on here, but for me this is as best a plan I can hatch... :blink:

The UK doesn't matter in a lot of ways, cruel as it may sound. If the subprime issue originated in the UK, it would probably stay there and global markets might at best blink in sympathy, before getting on with their daily business of turning the cash wheel. The US is important because it is the world's largest economy and practically all global financial markets take their lead from there (as well as their loans and investments as we are finding out). If the US economy nosedives, then the world's number one consumer is going to be eating less lead-painted toys, guzzling less oil and its red-faced CEOs will be dishing out less candy and jobs to us lesser mortals overseas. Global demand and global growth will fall, prices will retreat so inflation hawks will need to fly the nest for a while, Trichet et King and friends will start reducing interest rates for Christmas and those economies with too much of a love for the American consumer will soon find themselves staring into the orifice of an exporter's behind. In this context, the oft used and much abused word 'contagion' can legitimately be applied.

Were all this to start in the UK, most of the world wouldn't give a fiddlers and I'm sure the EU etc. would only be too happy to stridently point out that the problem was adequately 'contained' by Gordon and his merry (or is that Mervyn) knights - contained to the UK economy that is. Of course were the UK in the euro, it would not be that simple - the problem would have to be shared amongst all the playmates.

Edited by Sebastian

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  • 355 The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal



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