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I stopped visiting this forum back in Feb as I felt it was like watching paint dry, and was getting so negative. I didn't disagree with the excellent analysis of the regulars, I just felt I was spending too much time thinking about it.

There may be a mini rally, but I doubt it. The cat is out the bag, the emperor has no clothes and the global economy has been ******ed by a bunch of greedy and stupid bastards lending money to fools (not just rednecks in the states, but private equity too). As many on here know, this is just the beginning, when a couple more hedge funds go to the wall and drag a medium sized bank down with them, the market will really crash, no matter how much central banks pour in. I expect to see mass redundancies in the city later this year, tens of thousands possibly, no bonuses, salaries trimmed etc. This will be a catastrophe for the London property market with all the new builds going up at the moment. The BTL market will collapse first, and when those who have mortgaged their surrey semis to buy BTLs feel the pinch, the wider market will follow. London led the way up, and it will drag the whole country down like a boulder tied to the foot of a hedge fund manager.

This crash will be quicker than the last. It won't really get started till the new year, but once it does, it will be like nothing we have seen before, in terms of scale and speed because the scale of the bubble is so vast.

I don't feel sorry for the tossers in the city who will lose their shirts, but I feel for the Boots employees who will lose their jobs because the company can't afford the loan repayments when the high street dies, or the small businessman who has busted a gut to build a decent firm, only to see it go under because our economy is on its knees, or jo average who paid into a pension all his life to see the payments shrink by a half because the fund manager put it into products he didn't understand. There are very few who will escape the catastrophe that is coming completely unscathed.

Edited by HovelinHove

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Bl00dy hell, thats a bit heavy :blink: , anyway welcome back, things have changed a tad, but still along way to go yet, but at least we now completely out of the starting blocks! :lol:

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Guest Popalot
I stopped visiting this forum back in Feb as I felt it was like watching paint dry, and was getting so negative. I didn't disagree with the excellent analysis of the regulars, I just felt I was spending too much time thinking about it.

There may be a mini rally, but I doubt it. The cat is out the bag, the emperor has no clothes and the global economy has been ******ed by a bunch of greedy and stupid bastards lending money to fools (not just rednecks in the states, but private equity too). As many on here know, this is just the beginning, when a couple more hedge funds go to the wall and drag a medium sized bank down with them, the market will really crash, no matter how much central banks pour in. I expect to see mass redundancies in the city later this year, tens of thousands possibly, no bonuses, salaries trimmed etc. This will be a catastrophe for the London property market with all the new builds going up at the moment. The BTL market will collapse first, and when those who have mortgaged their surrey semis to buy BTLs feel the pinch, the wider market will follow. London led the way up, and it will drag the whole country down like a boulder tied to the foot of a hedge fund manager.

This crash will be quicker than the last. It won't really get started till the new year, but once it does, it will be like nothing we have seen before, in terms of scale and speed because the scale of the bubble is so vast.

I don't feel sorry for the tossers in the city who will lose their shirts, but I feel for the Boots employees who will lose their jobs because the company can't afford the loan repayments when the high street dies, or the small businessman who has busted a gut to build a decent firm, only to see it go under because our economy is on its knees, or jo average who paid into a pension all his life to see the payments shrink by a half because the fund manager put it into products he didn't understand. There are very few who will escape the catastrophe that is coming completely unscathed.

Totally agree and welcome back. I was with your wise absence, vicariously, it has been a painful wait, but what we all knew by logic and instinct it has finally arrived. :P

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I stopped visiting this forum back in Feb as I felt it was like watching paint dry, and was getting so negative. I didn't disagree with the excellent analysis of the regulars, I just felt I was spending too much time thinking about it.

There may be a mini rally, but I doubt it. The cat is out the bag, the emperor has no clothes and the global economy has been ******ed by a bunch of greedy and stupid bastards lending money to fools (not just rednecks in the states, but private equity too). As many on here know, this is just the beginning, when a couple more hedge funds go to the wall and drag a medium sized bank down with them, the market will really crash, no matter how much central banks pour in. I expect to see mass redundancies in the city later this year, tens of thousands possibly, no bonuses, salaries trimmed etc. This will be a catastrophe for the London property market with all the new builds going up at the moment. The BTL market will collapse first, and when those who have mortgaged their surrey semis to buy BTLs feel the pinch, the wider market will follow. London led the way up, and it will drag the whole country down like a boulder tied to the foot of a hedge fund manager.

This crash will be quicker than the last. It won't really get started till the new year, but once it does, it will be like nothing we have seen before, in terms of scale and speed because the scale of the bubble is so vast.

I don't feel sorry for the tossers in the city who will lose their shirts, but I feel for the Boots employees who will lose their jobs because the company can't afford the loan repayments when the high street dies, or the small businessman who has busted a gut to build a decent firm, only to see it go under because our economy is on its knees, or jo average who paid into a pension all his life to see the payments shrink by a half because the fund manager put it into products he didn't understand. There are very few who will escape the catastrophe that is coming completely unscathed.

I totally agree. BTL's will be the main culprits as many of the "johnny come lately" will panic when they appreciate that a 10% fall in house prices translates into a 40% fall in equity if its geared to 75% before the adjustment. The horrors of gearing which come into play in a falling market will be felt not just be hedge fund managers. BTL will also be severly effected. Also how will mortgage lenders treat those coming off fixed deals who can't re-mortgage with another lender (new customers only!)

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Guest d23
I stopped visiting this forum back in Feb as I felt it was like watching paint dry, and was getting so negative. I didn't disagree with the excellent analysis of the regulars, I just felt I was spending too much time thinking about it.

There may be a mini rally, but I doubt it. The cat is out the bag, the emperor has no clothes and the global economy has been ******ed by a bunch of greedy and stupid bastards lending money to fools (not just rednecks in the states, but private equity too). As many on here know, this is just the beginning, when a couple more hedge funds go to the wall and drag a medium sized bank down with them, the market will really crash, no matter how much central banks pour in. I expect to see mass redundancies in the city later this year, tens of thousands possibly, no bonuses, salaries trimmed etc. This will be a catastrophe for the London property market with all the new builds going up at the moment. The BTL market will collapse first, and when those who have mortgaged their surrey semis to buy BTLs feel the pinch, the wider market will follow. London led the way up, and it will drag the whole country down like a boulder tied to the foot of a hedge fund manager.

This crash will be quicker than the last. It won't really get started till the new year, but once it does, it will be like nothing we have seen before, in terms of scale and speed because the scale of the bubble is so vast.

I don't feel sorry for the tossers in the city who will lose their shirts, but I feel for the Boots employees who will lose their jobs because the company can't afford the loan repayments when the high street dies, or the small businessman who has busted a gut to build a decent firm, only to see it go under because our economy is on its knees, or jo average who paid into a pension all his life to see the payments shrink by a half because the fund manager put it into products he didn't understand. There are very few who will escape the catastrophe that is coming completely unscathed.

good post.

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I stopped visiting this forum back in Feb as I felt it was like watching paint dry, and was getting so negative. I didn't disagree with the excellent analysis of the regulars, I just felt I was spending too much time thinking about it.

There may be a mini rally, but I doubt it. The cat is out the bag, the emperor has no clothes and the global economy has been ******ed by a bunch of greedy and stupid bastards lending money to fools (not just rednecks in the states, but private equity too). As many on here know, this is just the beginning, when a couple more hedge funds go to the wall and drag a medium sized bank down with them, the market will really crash, no matter how much central banks pour in. I expect to see mass redundancies in the city later this year, tens of thousands possibly, no bonuses, salaries trimmed etc. This will be a catastrophe for the London property market with all the new builds going up at the moment. The BTL market will collapse first, and when those who have mortgaged their surrey semis to buy BTLs feel the pinch, the wider market will follow. London led the way up, and it will drag the whole country down like a boulder tied to the foot of a hedge fund manager.

This crash will be quicker than the last. It won't really get started till the new year, but once it does, it will be like nothing we have seen before, in terms of scale and speed because the scale of the bubble is so vast.

I don't feel sorry for the tossers in the city who will lose their shirts, but I feel for the Boots employees who will lose their jobs because the company can't afford the loan repayments when the high street dies, or the small businessman who has busted a gut to build a decent firm, only to see it go under because our economy is on its knees, or jo average who paid into a pension all his life to see the payments shrink by a half because the fund manager put it into products he didn't understand. There are very few who will escape the catastrophe that is coming completely unscathed.

Thats the spirit!!

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