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What Exactly Is A Young Professional?

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What today is deemed a "young professional"? Twenty years ago it meant someone whose profession was governed by an examination body with whom they were required to register before being allowed to practise their profession. It also meant that you could be struck off the register if malpractice was committed and in future be unable to work in that particular profession.

Paradoxically developers and financial institutions seem to have a different definition today particulary in relation to the housing market. They seem to consider that anyone able to afford to service a loan is professional. Some market researchers think that possession of an ipod ,flatscreen and a holiday abroad are the only requirements.

I think it now means someone under the age of thirty who works for a living, ie working class.

My friend who works on a tesco checkout considers herself a young professional by todays loose standards. Perhaps its a term to give young people an elevated opinion of themselves that far outweighs their actual competence levels. Perhaps this is an extension of modern schooling that forbids anyone being or feeling like a loser.

So basically the question is "what is a young professional" ? Does anyone actually know now?

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What today is deemed a "young professional"? Twenty years ago it meant someone whose profession was governed by an examination body with whom they were required to register before being allowed to practise their profession. It also meant that you could be struck off the register if malpractice was committed and in future be unable to work in that particular profession.

Paradoxically developers and financial institutions seem to have a different definition today particulary in relation to the housing market. They seem to consider that anyone able to afford to service a loan is professional. Some market researchers think that possession of an ipod ,flatscreen and a holiday abroad are the only requirements.

I think it now means someone under the age of thirty who works for a living, ie working class.

My friend who works on a tesco checkout considers herself a young professional by todays loose standards. Perhaps its a term to give young people an elevated opinion of themselves that far outweighs their actual competence levels. Perhaps this is an extension of modern schooling that forbids anyone being or feeling like a loser.

So basically the question is "what is a young professional" ? Does anyone actually know now?

just a feel good factor thats erroding fast.

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The true definition is a member of a professional body (RICS etc)that is 35 or under.

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a true young professional is a person that:

male. between 24-34 years. earns over 15k in any region within any profession.

who is willing to pay the pensions of the generation above without question or caution.

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What today is deemed a "young professional"? Twenty years ago it meant someone whose profession was governed by an examination body with whom they were required to register before being allowed to practise their profession. It also meant that you could be struck off the register if malpractice was committed and in future be unable to work in that particular profession.

Still does doesn't it? In fact arguably this trend is increasing, a lot of professions seem to be constantly reviewing and tightening their accreditation schemes (normally to disadvantage younger applicants and preserve the earning power of boomers as usual...but I digress). Although to be fair the shift was 20 years or so ago, not now, when the "barrow boys" were waving "wads" around in winebars.

That was around the time it became apparent to many that the (by comparison stagnant) professions were no longer the best way to become upwardly mobile.

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I agree - it used to mean something.

Now I think it is just a feel-good word used to make anybody under 30 who wears a suit to work think that they're special.

By giving them this great sounding title, they can be encouraged to buy into the lifestyle.... the lifestyle of those earning 3x what they ever will. The lifestyle that requires credit.

I've always said: I don't have a career, I have never had a career. I've had a series of jobs. And when one finishes I grab the next job that anybody offers me just to keep some cash coming in.

To me "professional" would have to mean some kind of structured career with opportunities to advance. And, some professional accreditation route.

They probably needed this new aspirational phrase for all those "graduates" that are being churned out. Make them think they achieved something.

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So basically the question is "what is a young professional" ? Does anyone actually know now?

I would start from the beginning and consider the oldest profession ;)

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So basically the question is "what is a young professional" ? Does anyone actually know now?

At a guess, I'd say that the first qualification is that you're not middle-aged or old. That is, 'young'.

Now it gets a bit more complicated i.e. the 'professional' bit. In the past, those people who had to work for a living but considered themselves a bit above the common herd gave themselves the pompous title of 'professional'. We all know that, in reality, they were in 'trade' like the rest of us but the poor little sods needed some high-faluting(spl?) description to make themselves feel a bit superior. In reality, they were just members of extremely strong trade unions like The Law Socy., The BMA. RICS etc. with a monopolistic hold over the rest of society. Once everyone stopped doffing their caps to these 'professionals' the title lost it's meaning. It now means, as others have said, whatever you want it to mean. Quite right, too.

p

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In the 60'&70' Sitcom 'The Likely Lads' Terry's friend became a 'young Executive'....as Thelma kept pointing out to Terry.....and yet he was not quite a 'young professional' in those days...today he probably would be ...'Time changes everything'..... :unsure::unsure::unsure:

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a true young professional is a person that:

male. between 24-34 years. earns over 15k in any region within any profession.

who is willing to pay the pensions of the generation above without question or caution.

I agree on everything

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Someone under 35 who wears a suit to work. Couple of criteria surrounding this - they cannot wear a polyester suit or buy their shirts from ASDA! Anyone wearing plastic clothing cannot be considered porfessional

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Someone who can read and write, life heavy weights, and wipes their nose with a hanky and not their sleeve.

Well that criteria would rule out most of todays school leavers becoming young professionals :lol:

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Well that criteria would rule out most of todays school leavers becoming young professionals :lol:

I always understood young professional to mean any t*** who works for companies like CarphoneWarehouse and uses expressionions like "Innit" and "Sweet as".

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Someone under 35 who wears a suit to work. Couple of criteria surrounding this - they cannot wear a polyester suit or buy their shirts from ASDA! Anyone wearing plastic clothing cannot be considered porfessional

that's really lame!!

...so it's a fashion statement then.

....guess I'm size zero.

...wasn't all that yaers ago but now totally in vogue....what's more people want to endlessly copy me!!

should be called a size xerox. :lol:

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I always understood young professional to mean any t*** who works for companies like CarphoneWarehouse and uses expressionions like "Innit" and "Sweet as".

Or any t*** who works in an office and wears a tie, and drives a new bmw mini, earning £12,000 a year, hardly a professional wage :lol:

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Such as? Cabinet maker?

I'm a cabinet maker!

I guess that makes me a 'professional' then.

Unfortunately at 47 I don't think I slip into the 'young' catogory quite so easily!

Seriously, this term 'professional' is a load of snobbish bollock$. Anyone who gets paid for doing their job is a 'professional'.

Edited by Mr Yogi

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that's really lame!!

...so it's a fashion statement then.

....guess I'm size zero.

...wasn't all that yaers ago but now totally in vogue....what's more people want to endlessly copy me!!

should be called a size xerox. :lol:

Not a fashion statement at all. Merely implying that a wage level that does not allow the person to buy a proper suit and shirt cannot be considered a professional wage and hence not a young professional

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