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The conditions don’t appear right for a HPC the economy is simply too buoyant, having met with some former colleagues over the weekend we noted how difficult it was to recruit software people at the moment, it’s not been like this since just before the dot com bubble burst but this time, unlike then, we are undergoing more steady growth in this sector.

How are other people on this forum finding the current economic climate?

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Mine has been worse than last year, largely expected though, but see my post from a few weeks ago :-

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/ind...50756&st=18

Trouble recruiting software people ? Not that I've seen as such, the trouble's been recruiting GOOD software people - those who know what they're doing and don't need their hand holding all the time. This is largely the reason why I end up doing most things for myself, which in itself is a limiting business factor.

What sector you in ?

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It is a lot healthier than VIs portray it.I think GDP will continue around the 0.7% level in Q3 and Q4.Meanwhile once again the indebted VIs like MPC Doves and young journos will use the supposed slowing economy as a reason to hold fire on rate rises to save their personal finances and they will win the argument,just as they won the argument in Q1 with the same excuse when GDP was at a healthy 0.8% quarterly.Unfortunately that cataclysmic error has left us with the highest core inflation in over ten years and it is set to go higher.

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Trouble recruiting software people ? Not that I've seen as such, the trouble's been recruiting GOOD software people - those who know what they're doing and don't need their hand holding all the time. This is largely the reason why I end up doing most things for myself, which in itself is a limiting business factor.

What sector you in ?

I'm in industrial control and detection software, my friends are in telecoms, advertising, leisure, and industrial plant production.

Naturally, I mean it’s tough finding capable staff.

My brother in law runs a roofing firm, their order book is full for the next few months also.

I like sustainable economic progress, I'm just wondering if this is it?

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My brother in law runs a roofing firm, their order book is full for the next few months also.

Hardly surprising.Sums up the current MEW fest,with householders unable to contain themselves spending some of the MPC generated paper equity currently standing at 6.5 trillion or over 100K per capita.In Gordy's miracle economy we are the richest large country in the world equity-wise.

There's a house near me that is being reroofed whilst it is on the market,obviously feels he has got to meet buyers exacting standards.Incidentally it is up for £189950,but was stamped in 2003 for £193000.And the Bulls reckon the MEW fest isn't distorting the housing indicies. :lol::lol:

Edited by crashmonitor

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The conditions don’t appear right for a HPC the economy is simply too buoyant, having met with some former colleagues over the weekend we noted how difficult it was to recruit software people at the moment, it’s not been like this since just before the dot com bubble burst but this time, unlike then, we are undergoing more steady growth in this sector.

How are other people on this forum finding the current economic climate?

With the government making freelancing and contracting a crime against humanity and all the health and safety b*llsh*t small business is dieing a death, or like myself being sucked back into big business.

Gorden really knows how grind his jack boot on the little guy.

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My industry always shifts into high-gear just before the bottom drops out. I suspect it's the same across the board. One day you're sitting there wondering how you're going to handle all the work, you can't hire good staff, you need more office space and ... three months later you've got nothing to do.

Things have seemed fantastic before every bust (my 3rd unfortunately) - that's why everyone gets caught short.

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I'm in industrial control and detection software, my friends are in telecoms, advertising, leisure, and industrial plant production.

Naturally, I mean it’s tough finding capable staff.

My brother in law runs a roofing firm, their order book is full for the next few months also.

I like sustainable economic progress, I'm just wondering if this is it?

What a coincidence. You sound like you're in a very similar line of business to me (industrial control systems with a management back ends in SQL Server or similar). Perhaps I should send you my CV :lol: .

My previous post was to not to highlight poor business in general, but rather to highlight the increased tax burden making things a whole lot 'less attractive' than they used to be. And it's likely to get worse before it gets better... ;)

Edited by JoePublic

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Ive been looking for work for over a year and never in my working life have I found it so hard to get a job, the employers are getting fussier and fussier, they can now list a set of skills 10 long (IT and networking) with full certification (which employers will not pay for now) and refuse to take anything less and anyone who works in IT/Network support knows they cant realy be fully skilled experts in 10 different fields. It used to be that if you could come up with 60% of the goodies you were in with a chance but not now(perhaps I should lie like it seem everyone else does). The other issue that currently employed people will not be aware of is the sheer quantity of people applying for jobs, the last time it was like this was in the early 90's and from my research wages have stagnated for years in many industries. I have also lately checked out more ordinary jobs and along with unemployed friends now suspect that the job situation is quite dire with many admin jobs paying less than 14K pa and still lots of more suitable competition.

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Ive been looking for work for over a year and never in my working life have I found it so hard to get a job, the employers are getting fussier and fussier, they can now list a set of skills 10 long (IT and networking) with full certification (which employers will not pay for now) and refuse to take anything less and anyone who works in IT/Network support knows they cant realy be fully skilled experts in 10 different fields. It used to be that if you could come up with 60% of the goodies you were in with a chance but not now(perhaps I should lie like it seem everyone else does). The other issue that currently employed people will not be aware of is the sheer quantity of people applying for jobs, the last time it was like this was in the early 90's and from my research wages have stagnated for years in many industries. I have also lately checked out more ordinary jobs and along with unemployed friends now suspect that the job situation is quite dire with many admin jobs paying less than 14K pa and still lots of more suitable competition.

Perhaps that is indicative of the times steve99. My experience tells me that the ones who really know what they're doing are the ones with hands on experience, not the ones who only have the 'bits of paper' (i.e. certification). It might help in some circumstances, but given a choice between someone who has certification in the required field(s) and no experience, and someone who has no certification but has 3-5 years experience doing a similar job, and I'd pick the latter (all things being equal).

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Ive been looking for work for over a year and never in my working life have I found it so hard to get a job, the employers are getting fussier and fussier, they can now list a set of skills 10 long (IT and networking) with full certification (which employers will not pay for now) and refuse to take anything less and anyone who works in IT/Network support knows they cant realy be fully skilled experts in 10 different fields. It used to be that if you could come up with 60% of the goodies you were in with a chance but not now(perhaps I should lie like it seem everyone else does). The other issue that currently employed people will not be aware of is the sheer quantity of people applying for jobs, the last time it was like this was in the early 90's and from my research wages have stagnated for years in many industries. I have also lately checked out more ordinary jobs and along with unemployed friends now suspect that the job situation is quite dire with many admin jobs paying less than 14K pa and still lots of more suitable competition.

I might be agreeing with this shortly. Worked in IT since 1986 - done the lot from sales/installation/training; writing/delivering training; taking/writing bespoke specifications - then delivering the software and training people on it; helpdesk, helpdesk manager, operations manager; project coordinator, project planning, project management; IT tutor/trainer, creating courses out of thin air and writing materials for it then delivering the courses for a local college (Oh, not paid for the thinking/writing time - then had to drive 12-15 miles to deliver the courses that they'd advertised - and if nobody turned up I could leave after an hour. - so all that work for £7 less petrol)

I then moved into internet marketing, creating/running PPC campaigns for people .... not successful - clients are mad. e.g. one client, budget agreed, everything agreed, then they queried their PPC bill of £1500 for one month - they didn't LOOK at the £440,000 of orders that had brought in and cancelled the contract. Doh! Cornwall eh - not with the real world at all.

I was finding nobody wanted to employ anybody - everybody wants you to do work - for peanuts - and self-employed.

So I decided I was living where there was no IT work and I had to get out as the place was full of mad people.

Sold my house, moved 200 miles, re-qualified as a Prince2 practitioner, placed myself within 75 miles of where I thought the jobs would be and sent off a few CVs for contracting. Not ONE phone call. So in the meantime took a wander round the local temp agencies (tested for typing at 97wpm, obviously very IT literate) - £7/hour they said - still no phone calls even for that.

Mind you - my plan was to take it easy until the end of August, as I thought contracts might perk up in September.

Not overly bothered though. Pot of cash from house is banked and I am earning pocket money from the Internet (£500-700/month). So I'll just ramp that up to get £2-3k/month from that between now and Xmas. But it's still a bugger!

Edited by ScaredEitherWay

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The conditions don’t appear right for a HPC the economy is simply too buoyant, having met with some former colleagues over the weekend we noted how difficult it was to recruit software people at the moment, it’s not been like this since just before the dot com bubble burst but this time, unlike then, we are undergoing more steady growth in this sector.

How are other people on this forum finding the current economic climate?

If you watch CNN you will see economic reports pointing toward growth and high performing business.

They point the trade floor sell of at the current sub prime and regular mortgage issues.

It seems that private equity firms were investing this money into buy outs and the stock market as a whole.

CNN, its like the BBC only sort of ;)

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Well, I work for an export company, and business is booming; which i'm very puzzled at due to the strong pound.

Oh, and how much do wasps cost the economy? Everyone seems to have a hissy hit when a wasp comes in. They even turned the lights off... when i'm trying to post on here!

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I then moved into internet marketing, creating/running PPC campaigns for people .... not successful - clients are mad. e.g. one client, budget agreed, everything agreed, then they queried their PPC bill of £1500 for one month - they didn't LOOK at the £440,000 of orders that had brought in and cancelled the contract. Doh! Cornwall eh - not with the real world at all.

This is the sort of thing they dont teach at business school. Ive been in business since 1997 and agree MOST clients are unreasonable lunatics.

The ones I love are those that want to 'pop in' for an hours 'initial chat'. They completely fail to recognise every second Im talking to them has a cost to include the costs of providing the business premises etc etc etc etc.

When Im feeling particularly bad tempered I reply to such people " no thanks Id rather spend unpaid time with my family than 'cahtting' to you " :lol:

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Ive just returned to the country after a 3 year absense and am about to start contracting.

Was absolutely astounded at the rate and there is loads of work in my field. (ERP).

When I start a contract I will be taking home 2.5 times what I was earning in the UK (permy) when I left 3 years ago.

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Ive been looking for work for over a year and never in my working life have I found it so hard to get a job, the employers are getting fussier and fussier, they can now list a set of skills 10 long (IT and networking) with full certification (which employers will not pay for now) and refuse to take anything less and anyone who works in IT/Network support knows they cant realy be fully skilled experts in 10 different fields.

The thing i have learnt working in IT is to specialise if you want to get on and be in demand.

Yes if you are going for run of the mill "two-a-penny" Microsoft or networking jobs then yes getting a job can be very competitive, and so they want to see certification etc - but if you can find a way to learn products and work hard in areas/industries that are very much in demand but specialised then you will have agents ringing you all the time for interviews.

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Guest Yeahbutnocrash

The company I work for is a US multi-national so the company doing well as a whole may not necessarily mean it's doing better in the UK or there are more jobs & prospects on the horizon in the UK what with outsourcing to India etc

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The thing i have learnt working in IT is to specialise if you want to get on and be in demand.

Yes if you are going for run of the mill "two-a-penny" Microsoft or networking jobs then yes getting a job can be very competitive, and so they want to see certification etc - but if you can find a way to learn products and work hard in areas/industries that are very much in demand but specialised then you will have agents ringing you all the time for interviews.

Any numpty can do microsoft/networking. Specialisation and cross-discipline is definitely key to regular well paid work.

If any job asks for certification then it aint worth a jot.

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Was this a hows your business doing post ?

Or a IT skills debate?

Just wondering....

By the way area I work in is doing well sales above budget......plenty of cheap immigrant labour about!

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So from HPC readers' prospective the economy is on an even keel, maybe GB has achieved a truly sustainable growing economy, where people’s real income will quietly fall but we will become more competitive in the world market!

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