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Am I Alone?


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Live: Leicester

Status: RTR (Live in rented accomodation and renting my house in SE for past 3 years due to overseas assignment)

Income: Around £40K

Equity: About £300K tied up in SE property. Only £30K accessible funds.

I could buy a ruddy massive house with my equity and a reasonable mortgage but I'm not sure its a great idea due to market instability, relocation possibility, re-sellability etc. etc. I mean, would you sell your 3 bed terrace in Windsor for a 5 bed detached in Leicester area at same price?? It may sound tempting but some of the houses around here have been on the market for 6+ months. Should I STR, STB, or just keep on with RTR? Decisions decisions... Will re-evaluate early next year based upon job, family needs, market trends, IR etc. etc.

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That’s an average of the last 3 years..

Plumbing and Heating contracting to local authorities, they let the council tenants have whatever they demand and don’t quibble about cost.

The money Labour throw at social housing is totally outrageous!

Just for the record I want a home to live in and I never want to be a BTL landlord.

Lots of people on this forum automatically think that if you have a high income that you could just buy anyway and hpc will have no effect, my job is very vulnerable to an economic downturn so there is no way I can commit to a huge mortgage for the next 25 years!

No matter what my income I still want value for money..

PP

Do I get it right and you are a plumber? :blink:

Whats the point in this country to get a degree..if the plumber makes more then 5 times that?

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Thanks to everyone who replied to my question, I’ve by wanting to ask that for some time.

Am I missing the whole point here?

People live to their means.

There aren’t many people posting on here who earn less that 20K PA…..That’s because the lower paid jobs aren’t based around a computer all day, they are out cleaning the streets, packing boxes in a factory, getting our sandwich ready for lunch, and caring for the sick..

These people also need a roof over there head, and the people on this site are speaking up on their behalf. Well done!

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Monopoly,

Have you not already decided to move back to Germany after you could not find a school place for your child? Or has the situation changed?

We plan (and always have planned) to move back to Austria in 1-3 years. We never intended to stay in this rainy country for good anyway. With the equity in our property and savings we can (almost) buy a nice house there outright. Out 3-bed flat in London is not bad - if one uses English standards that is. But if one uses Austrian standards it is not so good - it has only 850 square feet, 8' ceilings and a 500 square feet (private) garden. For the same money we could get a detached house in Austria in a nice area with 1800 square feet, 9' ceilings and a 1 acre garden. It is not difficult to decide where we want our baby boy (who is five weeks old today) to grow up....

London is a good place to raise children only if you are a multi millionaire or have 200k+ annual income. A HPC will not significantly change this fact.

LION

As a passionate Europhile, I believe the flow of people across our continent's borders is a wonderful thing.

Your post, however, awakened my inner xenophobe.

If the standard of living is so poor in "this rainy country", you must feel free to f*** off back to Greater Germany. :angry:

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Monopoly,

Have you not already decided to move back to Germany after you could not find a school place for your child? Or has the situation changed?

We plan (and always have planned) to move back to Austria in 1-3 years. We never intended to stay in this rainy country for good anyway. With the equity in our property and savings we can (almost) buy a nice house there outright. Out 3-bed flat in London is not bad - if one uses English standards that is. But if one uses Austrian standards it is not so good - it has only 850 square feet, 8' ceilings and a 500 square feet (private) garden. For the same money we could get a detached house in Austria in a nice area with 1800 square feet, 9' ceilings and a 1 acre garden. It is not difficult to decide where we want our baby boy (who is five weeks old today) to grow up....

London is a good place to raise children only if you are a multi millionaire or have 200k+ annual income. A HPC will not significantly change this fact.

LION

Yes and no...yes I want to leave for Germany, but hubby has to find a job first..he works for NATO..and no...our daughter goes to a very good school..but we were unable to get her into a good school were we wanted to move to....nightmare this..ether houses are to expensive....or ok priced and to far...or not so far and ok priced..but all the good schools are full...what ever comes first I take..ether a house here or job in Germany

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As a passionate Europhile, I believe the flow of people across our continent's borders is a wonderful thing.

Your post, however, awakened my inner xenophobe.

If the standard of living is so poor in "this rainy country", you must feel free to f*** off back to Greater Germany. :angry:

Maybe you should put you glasses on :rolleyes:..it was not me who find this country rainy....and it was not Lion who wants to go to Germany.

Here just for you....LION wants to leave this "rainy country" behind and go to OZ and I MONOPOLY want to stay..but also want a house and not a chicken hut..

Alles klar?

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Maybe you should put you glasses on :rolleyes:..it was not me who find this country rainy....and it was not Lion who wants to go to Germany.

Here just for you....LION wants to leave this "rainy country" behind and go to OZ and I MONOPOLY want to stay..but also want a house and not a chicken hut..

Alles klar?

With respect, my reply was directed at LION.

And the "Greater Germany" comment was an Anschluss reference :)

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Maybe you should put you glasses on :rolleyes:..it was not me who find this country rainy....and it was not Lion who wants to go to Germany.

Here just for you....LION wants to leave this "rainy country" behind and go to OZ and I MONOPOLY want to stay..but also want a house and not a chicken hut..

Alles klar?

Austria not Australia.

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Was it a permanent job - or were you working on a contract or in a govt agency? Just asking because I know people in both categories and their jobs are not secure. Govt decides that your agency's work will no longer be done = bye bye. My job will still be around in a recession.

Let's hope your belief in a recession proof job is not misplaced. In the last recession a lot of people in recession proof jobs were made redundant - including government employees.

People I know in local government keep telling me how they are regularly reviewed and the service they perform is compared to outsourcing etc. As the tax burden grows, as the weight of your and your colleagues' jobs becomes a drag on an economy which is absolutely and definitely heading into recession, if not slump, then you might find your job is not as important as you think it is and - out you go.

I've noticed a lot of people working in government jobs - I deal with a few health related government organizations - are only employed for 2 or 3 days a week. Great if it suits them. Not if it doesn't but it is all that's on offer.

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Let's hope your belief in a recession proof job is not misplaced. In the last recession a lot of people in recession proof jobs were made redundant - including government employees.

People I know in local government keep telling me how they are regularly reviewed and the service they perform is compared to outsourcing etc. As the tax burden grows, as the weight of your and your colleagues' jobs becomes a drag on an economy which is absolutely and definitely heading into recession, if not slump, then you might find your job is not as important as you think it is and - out you go.

I've noticed a lot of people working in government jobs - I deal with a few health related government organizations - are only employed for 2 or 3 days a week. Great if it suits them. Not if it doesn't but it is all that's on offer.

I suspect you're wasting your time. Tara will remain smug until the moment her P45 arrives <_<

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As a passionate Europhile, I believe the flow of people across our continent's borders is a wonderful thing.

Your post, however, awakened my inner xenophobe.

If the standard of living is so poor in "this rainy country", you must feel free to f*** off back to Greater Germany. :angry:

When we moved here in 2000 we accepted the rainy weather as it was not a permanent move anyway. So the rain is fine (temporarily), although I wonder will there be any summer this year? The reason for our move was - as it is in most cases for people who move to the UK - the offer of very good jobs. I am now one of the directors of a UK based aerospace company that makes a lot of business with Germany (Airbus), so both my language and PhD (material science) are useful for my company. My wife also works there part time (in Research and Development).

Well, our jobs turned out to be as rewarding and interesting as we hoped they would be. I can even do a part time company sponsored MBA. Otherwise we are somewhat disappointed with Britain - especially with London. This has mainly to do with the quality of property (or the lack thereof), and crime (including annoying low level crime).

PROPERTY

Property in Britain is not only expensive, but also tiny and often VERY badly built. In most other European countries these old tiny shoebox terraces would have been knocked down long ago. Not only are these tiny shoe boxes still "maintained", but even smaller new properties are built.

Main reasons in my opinion: Planning restrictions and speculation (goes hand in hand).

CRIME

Although we live in a nice area (N14), I sometimes take the public transport home from work which passes through some not so nice areas of the capital. On one of these trips I was mugged at knifepoint - not a nice experience. I think the breakdown of families (absent fathers) is one of the key reasons for the breakdown of the society. Kids in Austria are usually nice, friendly and harmless (as I remember them). "Kids" in London are quite often dangerous, armed thugs - especially when they are in larger groups.

Main reasons in my opinion: The breakdown of families (including absent fathers) and the UK benefits system that rewards bad behaviour and lazyness.

So, to sum it up, we gained a lot of experience and money in Britain, but we are also looking forward to leave Britain again. OUR BABY WILL NOT GROW UP HERE. We cannot do this to him.

There are a few things we will miss - the musicals, the museums, the National Trust properties, the multicultural life in London, my colleagues at work and other friends we made here, and the strict no smoking policy.

Britain has certainly benefited from us as well, as we have paid cashloads of tax and NHS contributions during the last 7 years without (ever) getting much back from the (UK) system ourselves and our jobs - especially mine - could not have easily been done by a "native" as German mother tongue was required for my job (initially).

LION

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When we moved here in 2000 we accepted the rainy weather as it was not a permanent move anyway. So the rain is fine (temporarily), although I wonder will there be any summer this year? The reason for our move was - as it is in most cases for people who move to the UK - the offer of very good jobs. I am now one of the directors of a UK based aerospace company that makes a lot of business with Germany (Airbus), so both my language and PhD (material science) are useful for my company. My wife also works there part time (in Research and Development).

Well, our jobs turned out to be as rewarding and interesting as we hoped they would be. I can even do a part time company sponsored MBA. Otherwise we are somewhat disappointed with Britain - especially with London. This has mainly to do with the quality of property (or the lack thereof), and crime (including annoying low level crime).

PROPERTY

Property in Britain is not only expensive, but also tiny and often VERY badly built. In most other European countries these old tiny shoebox terraces would have been knocked down long ago. Not only are these tiny shoe boxes still "maintained", but even smaller new properties are built.

Main reasons in my opinion: Planning restrictions and speculation (goes hand in hand).

CRIME

Although we live in a nice area (N14), I sometimes take the public transport home from work which passes through some not so nice areas of the capital. On one of these trips I was mugged at knifepoint - not a nice experience. I think the breakdown of families (absent fathers) is one of the key reasons for the breakdown of the society. Kids in Austria are usually nice, friendly and harmless (as I remember them). "Kids" in London are quite often dangerous, armed thugs - especially when they are in larger groups.

Main reasons in my opinion: The breakdown of families (including absent fathers) and the UK benefits system that rewards bad behaviour and lazyness.

So, to sum it up, we gained a lot of experience and money in Britain, but we are also looking forward to leave Britain again. OUR BABY WILL NOT GROW UP HERE. We cannot do this to him.

There are a few things we will miss - the musicals, the museums, the National Trust properties, the multicultural life in London, my colleagues at work and other friends we made here, and the strict no smoking policy.

Britain has certainly benefited from us as well, as we have paid cashloads of tax and NHS contributions during the last 7 years without (ever) getting much back from the (UK) system ourselves and our jobs - especially mine - could not have easily been done by a "native" as German mother tongue was required for my job (initially).

LION

I have to disagree with some points..it is the same shit rainy weather in Germany at the moment...and only because you see those "armed thugs" around..does not mean that there are no nice kids around..they just not hanging around on the street.

But I agree..the crime is bad and housing is ridiculous compare to Germany or Austria...but parts of me still like it lots here..kids are happy in school..hubby is happy with his job and all we really need is a house... :(

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I have to disagree with some points..it is the same shit rainy weather in Germany at the moment...and only because you see those "armed thugs" around..does not mean that there are no nice kids around..they just not hanging around on the street.

But I agree..the crime is bad and housing is ridiculous compare to Germany or Austria...but parts of me still like it lots here..kids are happy in school..hubby is happy with his job and all we really need is a house... :(

As I pointed out, the rainy weather is not too important for us although I am sure it is currently nicer in Austria - summers are usually hotter there and winters colder. As it should be.

About the kids - well, there are certainly nice kids also in London but you will have a lot of work to keep your kid(s) away from the "bad" kids as there are so many of them in London - even in the nice areas there seem to be groups of them. We are not confident we will be able to do this. This is the main reason why we do not want our baby to grow up here. He might get bullied by bad kids - or worse - join the bad kids.

I wish you Good Luck with the house hunting.

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Let's hope your belief in a recession proof job is not misplaced. In the last recession a lot of people in recession proof jobs were made redundant - including government employees.

People I know in local government keep telling me how they are regularly reviewed and the service they perform is compared to outsourcing etc. As the tax burden grows, as the weight of your and your colleagues' jobs becomes a drag on an economy which is absolutely and definitely heading into recession, if not slump, then you might find your job is not as important as you think it is and - out you go.

I've noticed a lot of people working in government jobs - I deal with a few health related government organizations - are only employed for 2 or 3 days a week. Great if it suits them. Not if it doesn't but it is all that's on offer.

Thanks for the concern...

:)

What's with all the interest in my job anyway??? I can assure you that quite a few people have recession-proof jobs.

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When we moved here in 2000 we accepted the rainy weather as it was not a permanent move anyway. So the rain is fine (temporarily), although I wonder will there be any summer this year?

off topic I know but average annual rainfall in London is less than in Vienna, which has it's highest rainfall from may to august

Parts of the United Kingdom are surprisingly dry (contrary to stereotype) - London receives less rain annually than Rome, Sydney or New York. In Eastern England it typically rains on about 1 day in 4 and slightly more in winter.
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off topic I know but average annual rainfall in London is less than in Vienna, which has it's highest rainfall from may to august

I know what you mean - but it is the type of rain that is annoying in London. In London we have long periods with little rain, grey sky and generally miserable weather although there is actually not much rain falling. It is "rainy" but not actually raining a lot.

In Vienna there are can be a few hours of heavy rain and then there is sunshine for a few days or weeks. When I was a kid I loved the Austrian thunderstorms (Sommergewitter) - they have something magical. And the sky is clear afterwards (although it is now less than it used to be).

Another problem in the UK is that the weather can change much quicker - it is not so predictable than on the continent. Sometimes it is sunny, we prepare our baby for a walk, and when he is dressed it is raining again.

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