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Sweeping Up After Gordon Brown: He's Dumped A Load;

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I like Jeff Randal of the Telegraph; he says it how it is!

Sweeping up after Gordon Brown

By Jeff Randall

Britain's new Prime Minister

Whole article here: - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jh...6/29/do2902.xml

Excerpts here:

At precisely 10.15am yesterday, the CBI sent me a press release, welcoming the "appointment of Alistair Darling as Chancellor". Funny that, because it was not until an hour or so later that Gordon Brown formally announced his successor.

So much for the incoming Prime Minister's promise to break with Labour's bedrock tactic of pre-emptive leaks and follow-up spin. The pledge lasted not even 24 hours.

He says that he has been listening. And what he has heard is "the need for change". A burning desire among decent folk for "a new government with new priorities".

Setting aside the probability that, when people told Brown they wanted new faces, his wasn't on their list, let's examine the prospects for meaningful change now that the furniture from Number 11 has been moved next door.

In the case of Brown, I suspect, doubly so. If we are to enjoy a new age of open, responsive, two-way, collegiate government, Flash Gordon, the control freak who believes he can save the world, must transmogrify into a leader with an appetite for delegating important decisions.

Ooh, look! There goes a spotless leopard. Sorry, it ain't going to happen.

For 10 years, the Blair-Brown regime had a concentration of power that would not be tolerated in a publicly quoted company. Blair was, in effect, the chairman, head of marketing and international sales officer; Brown was the chief executive, finance director and auditor. In terms of good corporate governance, it was a disaster.

At the Treasury, Brown used his control of the nation's coffers to influence domestic policy more ruthlessly and effectively than any chancellor in modern times. He wasn't simply in charge of raising revenue; he told every other department how and when the money could be spent.

When he decided to play out his fantasies on health and education, frightened ministers did his bidding or were frozen out. When he raided our corporate pension pots, nobody dared complain. If the books didn't balance, never mind. Brown made up the rules, fiddled the numbers and published the accounts.

His fiscal omnipotence allowed him to rescript an old joke: "Let us be happy and live within our means... even if we have to borrow to do it."

None of this, however, will be part of the new Chancellor's brief. Instead, as bankruptcies rise, homes are repossessed and Britain's economic performance sags under the burden of rising taxes and sluggish productivity, Darling's task will be to sweep up the piles of dung left behind by Brown, all the while tugging his forelock and thanking Gordon for the job. ---- Good Stuff!!!

Edited by eric pebble

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I like Jeff Randal of the Telegraph; he says it how it is!

Sweeping up after Gordon Brown

By Jeff Randall

Britain's new Prime Minister

Whole article here: - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jh...6/29/do2902.xml

Excerpts here:

At precisely 10.15am yesterday, the CBI sent me a press release, welcoming the "appointment of Alistair Darling as Chancellor". Funny that, because it was not until an hour or so later that Gordon Brown formally announced his successor.

So much for the incoming Prime Minister's promise to break with Labour's bedrock tactic of pre-emptive leaks and follow-up spin. The pledge lasted not even 24 hours.

He says that he has been listening. And what he has heard is "the need for change". A burning desire among decent folk for "a new government with new priorities".

Setting aside the probability that, when people told Brown they wanted new faces, his wasn't on their list, let's examine the prospects for meaningful change now that the furniture from Number 11 has been moved next door.

In the case of Brown, I suspect, doubly so. If we are to enjoy a new age of open, responsive, two-way, collegiate government, Flash Gordon, the control freak who believes he can save the world, must transmogrify into a leader with an appetite for delegating important decisions.

Ooh, look! There goes a spotless leopard. Sorry, it ain't going to happen.

For 10 years, the Blair-Brown regime had a concentration of power that would not be tolerated in a publicly quoted company. Blair was, in effect, the chairman, head of marketing and international sales officer; Brown was the chief executive, finance director and auditor. In terms of good corporate governance, it was a disaster.

At the Treasury, Brown used his control of the nation's coffers to influence domestic policy more ruthlessly and effectively than any chancellor in modern times. He wasn't simply in charge of raising revenue; he told every other department how and when the money could be spent.

When he decided to play out his fantasies on health and education, frightened ministers did his bidding or were frozen out. When he raided our corporate pension pots, nobody dared complain. If the books didn't balance, never mind. Brown made up the rules, fiddled the numbers and published the accounts.

His fiscal omnipotence allowed him to rescript an old joke: "Let us be happy and live within our means... even if we have to borrow to do it."

None of this, however, will be part of the new Chancellor's brief. Instead, as bankruptcies rise, homes are repossessed and Britain's economic performance sags under the burden of rising taxes and sluggish productivity, Darling's task will be to sweep up the piles of dung left behind by Brown, all the while tugging his forelock and thanking Gordon for the job. ---- Good Stuff!!!

If we are to enjoy a new age of open, responsive, two-way, collegiate government, Flash Gordon, the control freak who believes he can save the world, must transmogrify into a leader with an appetite for delegating important decisions.

Ooh, look! There goes a spotless leopard. Sorry, it ain't going to happen.

Randall used to be a decent journalist. Hes more in keeping with the Star than a broadsheet. I think GB is a waste of space, but Randall is a bigger one.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
I like Jeff Randal of the Telegraph; he says it how it is!

Sweeping up after Gordon Brown

By Jeff Randall

Britain's new Prime Minister

Whole article here: - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jh...6/29/do2902.xml

Excerpts here:

At precisely 10.15am yesterday, the CBI sent me a press release, welcoming the "appointment of Alistair Darling as Chancellor". Funny that, because it was not until an hour or so later that Gordon Brown formally announced his successor.

So much for the incoming Prime Minister's promise to break with Labour's bedrock tactic of pre-emptive leaks and follow-up spin. The pledge lasted not even 24 hours.

He says that he has been listening. And what he has heard is "the need for change". A burning desire among decent folk for "a new government with new priorities".

Setting aside the probability that, when people told Brown they wanted new faces, his wasn't on their list, let's examine the prospects for meaningful change now that the furniture from Number 11 has been moved next door.

In the case of Brown, I suspect, doubly so. If we are to enjoy a new age of open, responsive, two-way, collegiate government, Flash Gordon, the control freak who believes he can save the world, must transmogrify into a leader with an appetite for delegating important decisions.

Ooh, look! There goes a spotless leopard. Sorry, it ain't going to happen.

For 10 years, the Blair-Brown regime had a concentration of power that would not be tolerated in a publicly quoted company. Blair was, in effect, the chairman, head of marketing and international sales officer; Brown was the chief executive, finance director and auditor. In terms of good corporate governance, it was a disaster.

At the Treasury, Brown used his control of the nation's coffers to influence domestic policy more ruthlessly and effectively than any chancellor in modern times. He wasn't simply in charge of raising revenue; he told every other department how and when the money could be spent.

When he decided to play out his fantasies on health and education, frightened ministers did his bidding or were frozen out. When he raided our corporate pension pots, nobody dared complain. If the books didn't balance, never mind. Brown made up the rules, fiddled the numbers and published the accounts.

His fiscal omnipotence allowed him to rescript an old joke: "Let us be happy and live within our means... even if we have to borrow to do it."

None of this, however, will be part of the new Chancellor's brief. Instead, as bankruptcies rise, homes are repossessed and Britain's economic performance sags under the burden of rising taxes and sluggish productivity, Darling's task will be to sweep up the piles of dung left behind by Brown, all the while tugging his forelock and thanking Gordon for the job. ---- Good Stuff!!!

All quite salient.

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Brown's future is tied to the credit tap. The tap is being shut off. Goodbye Gordon it was 'orrible knowing ye...."

I've had quite an horible thought brooding in my mind for a couple of days. What if 'Brown Labour' pull out all the stops to keep the boom going for another nine months and then call a snap election in April 2008? They could go into the election with the mantra that 'people have never had it so good and that it will get even better'.

We all know what would happen after the election was won.

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That's another great piece by Jeff Randall and some excellent readers comments after it with several referring to a coming meltdown in house prices.

The Telegraph are certainly exposing the major frailties in the UK economy at the moment, Cameron and Osborne should follow their lead and start to question the myth of Brown's economic prudence, though I'm sure the market will speak for itself before too long.

Telegraph: Jeff Randall

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Guest Winnie
I've had quite an horible thought brooding in my mind for a couple of days. What if 'Brown Labour' pull out all the stops to keep the boom going for another nine months and then call a snap election in April 2008? They could go into the election with the mantra that 'people have never had it so good and that it will get even better'.

We all know what would happen after the election was won.

This is my orrible thought too, something along the lines of: cut IRs, sterling crashes so join euro, meanwhile HP still alive and well so whilst the city and anyone with the ability to think for themselves are reeling.... the sheeple still vote him back in.....

Surely this would amount to a total dictatorship..... My other big problem, the tories are not attacking him on HP enough - their blatant capitalist landlord mentality, keep the rich rich etc is still very much in place....

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This is my orrible thought too, something along the lines of: cut IRs, sterling crashes so join euro, meanwhile HP still alive and well so whilst the city and anyone with the ability to think for themselves are reeling.... the sheeple still vote him back in.....

Surely this would amount to a total dictatorship..... My other big problem, the tories are not attacking him on HP enough - their blatant capitalist landlord mentality, keep the rich rich etc is still very much in place....

You know..... I thought of this too....... it is SERIOUSLY scary...... AND I think the sdark powers behind the throne - the VI's - may very well be plotting such a course at this moment......... Time for a Revolution.....

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You know..... I thought of this too....... it is SERIOUSLY scary...... AND I think the sdark powers behind the throne - the VI's - may very well be plotting such a course at this moment......... Time for a Revolution.....

...no need for Revolution.....get rid of the Scottish Westminster MP's as the format is undemocratic...the MSPs will serve Scotland, perfectly.......Mr Brown here is your P45....good riddance...!

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You know..... I thought of this too....... it is SERIOUSLY scary...... AND I think the sdark powers behind the throne - the VI's - may very well be plotting such a course at this moment......... Time for a Revolution.....

Well we might be saved a continuing boom as it looks like they're going for a general election as soon as Autumn. Even they know it can't last forever.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml...01/nelec101.xml

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Well we might be saved a continuing boom as it looks like they're going for a general election as soon as Autumn. Even they know it can't last forever.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml...01/nelec101.xml

Cameron's brochure should point out in a democratic society, Brown should not exist in Government, being a Scottish Wetminster MP.....as stated before....Scotland will be looked after,perfectly, by their own MSPs.......Brown showing true lack of ethics has not mentioned the West Lothian question.....Cameron show your salt or get out........!

The glossy, 25-page document sets out a polling strategy under the slogan "Keep It Labour" and identifies eight key areas as the battleground against David Cameron's Conservatives.
Edited by South Lorne

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Cameron's brochure should point out in a democratic society, Brown should not exist in Government, being a Scottish Wetminster MP.....as stated before....Scotland will be looked after,perfectly, by their own MSPs.......Brown showing true lack of ethics has not mentioned the West Lothian question.....Cameron show your salt or get out........!

Agreed....

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  • 241 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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