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Newsnight Report On Bond Markets Coming Up Now

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Just a "heads up"!

alll i can see are a bunch of farmers complaining... are they the bond traders? if so, then we're all up a certain creek without a certain paddle.. :unsure:

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Yes, err... this farming feature is going on longer than I expected! They said earlier that they were going to talk about the bond market and there's only 10m left so it can't be long!

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Yes, err... this farming feature is going on longer than I expected! They said earlier that they were going to talk about the bond market and there's only 10m left so it can't be long!

Farmers bit is over now (finally!), and now we have 'what is the fascination with caravaning'.

geez, newsnight has really gone downhill recently!

AH WAIT! HERE WE GO!

Edited by SHERWICK

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Here we are:

"Bond markets have gone back to yields we haven't seen since the late 90s"

"China and Japan are beginning to diversify their bonds"

Agh!!!! That was it!!! No mention of any consequences!!!

Sorry for wasting your time, folks. I assumed they might actually SAY something.

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Farmers bit is over now (finally!), and now we have 'what is the fascination with caravaning'.

geez, newsnight has really gone downhill recently!

AH WAIT! HERE WE GO!

the tone seemed to be along the lines of "nothing to see here folks, move along now..!"

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the tone seemed to be along the lines of "nothing to see here folks, move along now..!"

It's all to do with higher economic growth and competing investments. I suppose this is one way of talking about inflation.

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Where DO bogeys come from?

funnily enough, newsnight have a 25 minute feature tomorrow on this very topic (ok, so it's 5 min shorter than 'the joy of caravaning' today, but still).

Don't forget to 'tune' in!

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Sorry for wasting your time, folks. I assumed they might actually SAY something.

Emily Whatsername did preview the item at the beginning of the programme by saying "Should we be worried?" So you were reasonable to expect more than we actually got. Presumably they were over running.

I know there is a section of this forum about economics, which I intend to read when I can do so in peace and quiet, but does anyone have any suggestions for a decent, but readable, book that explains the subject?

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Does anyone have any suggestions for a decent, but readable, book that explains the subject?

I looked at a few books to try to understand the relationship between bond prices and the wider economy (hint: it's about the cost of borrowing money).

None of them really made the subject clear, but in the end I came to understand the essentials just from reading articles on this site and following the links.

I think if you keep doing the same you'll get a reasonable idea how it works... only in the last week have I come to realise that fixed rate mortgage rates are intimately linked to bond yields.

(Further hint: Variable mortgage rates track the Bank of England base rate but fixed rates depend on investors buying interest-bearing investments whereby they invest their capital and receive interest payments. The borrower gets the capital and pays interest payments: Essentially this is the definition of a bond. RISING BOND YIELDS = MORE EXPENSIVE FIXED RATES FOR BORROWERS.)

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Thanks for the heads up.

Found the farming bit interesting, the bond bit was laughable in its depth of analysis.

Leaves me with a couple of questions.

What is the real price of milk once the taxpayer has paid a farmer a goodly sum to produce close to feck all?

Just how exposed are we going to be to a trashing of the £ at some distant (or not so distant) time? Or indeed there is a major disruption in foreign supply of goods?

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I looked at a few books to try to understand the relationship between bond prices and the wider economy (hint: it's about the cost of borrowing money).

(Further hint: Variable mortgage rates track the Bank of England base rate but fixed rates depend on investors buying interest-bearing investments whereby they invest their capital and receive interest payments. The borrower gets the capital and pays interest payments: Essentially this is the definition of a bond. RISING BOND YIELDS = MORE EXPENSIVE FIXED RATES FOR BORROWERS.)

Thanks for this. I had in fact already figured out your hints, but would quite like to have a deeper understanding of the terms used (I suspect, for instance that the word 'Bond' is applied to more than one thing).

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I don't think she really understood what she was talking about! It sounded like someone had written something for her to say.

I had the same thoughts

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