Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Guest wrongmove

Up The Property Ladder – Then Kick It Away

Recommended Posts

Guest wrongmove

The Times is full of it today - here is another

Up the property ladder – then kick it away

"If my generation of the young middle-aged ever expresses youthful regret, it rarely concerns a love affair unsaved or a careless act that ruined a friendship. It is more likely to be phrased “Why did you insist we sold the bloody house two years before the boom?” or “If only we’d picked up that grotty seafront flat in 1998 we wouldn’t now have to work until we’re 75”.

My husband’s occasional lament is that, instead of selling our last home when we bought our present one, we didn’t keep it, string together a bridging loan and rent it out. He thinks about the capital gains, I think about the worry, the risk, the careless strangers stomping around the home I made and where I had my babies, the inevitable late-night calls to fix the dodgy Saniflow, the necessity of having to read and understand the financial pages, the hassle, ennui and bureaucracy of playing Mrs Rigsby. And besides, wouldn’t it be excessive, a bit greedy, to own two London homes?

I realise this is contra the spirit of our age. We are all speculators now, consumers of property porn, managing directors of Me-Me-Me plc, safeguarding our financial futures because the State isn’t to be relied upon. And most pension plans will not bestow the quality of retirement we feel we deserve, which, far from the frugal pleasures of our parents, is dappled with foreign sunshine and toasted in good wines. .........."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Times is full of it today - here is another

Up the property ladder – then kick it away

"If my generation of the young middle-aged ever expresses youthful regret, it rarely concerns a love affair unsaved or a careless act that ruined a friendship. It is more likely to be phrased “Why did you insist we sold the bloody house two years before the boom?” or “If only we’d picked up that grotty seafront flat in 1998 we wouldn’t now have to work until we’re 75”.

My husband’s occasional lament is that, instead of selling our last home when we bought our present one, we didn’t keep it, string together a bridging loan and rent it out. He thinks about the capital gains, I think about the worry, the risk, the careless strangers stomping around the home I made and where I had my babies, the inevitable late-night calls to fix the dodgy Saniflow, the necessity of having to read and understand the financial pages, the hassle, ennui and bureaucracy of playing Mrs Rigsby. And besides, wouldn’t it be excessive, a bit greedy, to own two London homes?

I realise this is contra the spirit of our age. We are all speculators now, consumers of property porn, managing directors of Me-Me-Me plc, safeguarding our financial futures because the State isn’t to be relied upon. And most pension plans will not bestow the quality of retirement we feel we deserve, which, far from the frugal pleasures of our parents, is dappled with foreign sunshine and toasted in good wines. .........."

As I say - the World's Biggest Ever Pyramid Selling Scam......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As I say - the World's Biggest Ever Pyramid Selling Scam......

Absolutely spot on.

As long as the person on the next rung down is brainwashed into paying a little bit more, with a little more "cheap" money from the bank, the pyramid will grow taller. The moment the banks stop being so "generous", or the money becomes a bit too expensive, the pryramid will start to collapse. Yes, HPI may have been helped along by a housing shortage, but I wonder if the so called shortage is largely part of the brainwashing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why talk down a market you hold a large position in, you need to sell it to someone, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And when the market turns down, those regrets will turn to relief

Er, why?

From their purely selfish point of view, they could have kept hold of the house, earned a bit of rental income (which would have been a decent return on their investment, presumably), and sold up now. Why do they care if the market turns now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 355 The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.