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Drewboy

Key Workers

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Good afternoon to eveyone.

As a Soldier serving in Germany i would like to highlight an area that has become apparent to myself as being totaly unjust. We are without a doubt the lowest paid of all the so called key workers that Mr Blair and his croonies like to pretend are his favorites. If we are even considered as key workers by certain districts. As i have found out whilst trying to buy when i visited friends in Wales. I found two properties that had come up for purchase built for the sole purpose of key workers. When i enquired to the local council (Dyfed) i was informed that apparently that because i was a soldier a didnt qualify. ********. We have also fallen into the trap of morgage companys who will not take my spouses wage into consideration because she gets paid tax free.

We have come to the conclusion that it is no longer a benifit to ourselves to stay in the Military for either financial reasons or stability as we are away so often now that it makes almost impossible to plan a move or even look for a property.

The only option now for most serving soldiers is to emigrate and i can assure you this is happening more and more as countries like Austrlia are willing to take soldiers leaving from the services.

Why am i so rattled. Because i have just watched the news and learnt that the good old school teaching profesion is threatining to go on strike for a further ten percent wage increase because there workers cant afford to buy property. All this plus six or seven weeks paid summer holidays. My heart bleeds for their misfortune.

Get a life and stop holding the UK to ransome.

You could be forgiven for thinking that you were Firemen.

Drew

:ph34r:

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The average wage is £25k whether you are public/private/key or not, that also means a good chunk of people earn below that level. Your average worker is simply screwed, big business and government has waged a remorseless class war against workers, they now experience negative real wage growth and a cost of living going through the roof.

However, a minority of people are doing very well and a good number have been bought off in the short-term thanks to MEW and endless debt fueled shopping sprees, but the latter cannot last.

Edited by BuyingBear

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I agree with you 200% that the military has been completely and utterly shafted by this government. It has been squeezed in a vice between Old Labour's long standing antipathy for the armed forces and Blair's half-baked stunt at playing the international statesman. The result has been a dangerous overstretch in Iraq and Afghanistan, with soldiers being asked to take on ever more ambitious and dangerous jobs but without the money or political backing to do them properly. It surprises me that there hasn't been a deluge of resignations from the armed forces in recent years, though it would surprise me a bit less if there has and the NuLab-enthralled media have tried to cover it up. And it's not as if the military don't have transferable skills. A very good friend of mine used to be in the RAF: she now flies A320s for Easyjet.

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I must agree with you there.

Who done the fire mens jobs when they were on strike? You for less money.

Yes, you had no qualms about scabbing when the firemen were trying to protect their pay and conditions.

And now you are faced with the same dilemma as the firemen and the teachers.

How can you afford to carry on in the job, when the government are not paying you enough to live on?

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the problem with the armed forces, is the same as with other jobs in the uk, immigrants.

the armed forces are actively recruiting more and more soldiers from overseas, give it a few years, and there wont even be a british person in the armed forces, why employ someone british when you can have a ghurka or fijian for £50 a week ?

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I must agree with you there.

Who done the fire mens jobs when they were on strike? You for less money.

Our servicemen are treated absymally, their housing is substandard and will remain so for another two decades. The MoD is the second largest land owner in the country so clearly they cannot find any land to build anything better.

If migrants were treated this way they'd quite justifiably riot.

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Good afternoon to eveyone.

As a Soldier serving in Germany...............

Drew

:ph34r:

Perhaps you can explain to us why being a soldier in Germany makes you a key worker? Come home the war ended 50 years ago. :lol:

In all seriousness, don't be drawn into the "divide and rule" bull about key workers. We all deserve a decent slice of the UK pie as we all contribute to it (I'm talking about those who actually contribute and those who can't contribute through no fault of their own).

edit: on second thoughts, have you considered a military coup?

Edited by Smell the Fear

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Good afternoon to eveyone.

As a Soldier serving in Germany i would like to highlight an area that has become apparent to myself as being totaly unjust. We are without a doubt the lowest paid of all the so called key workers that Mr Blair and his croonies like to pretend are his favorites. If we are even considered as key workers by certain districts. As i have found out whilst trying to buy when i visited friends in Wales. I found two properties that had come up for purchase built for the sole purpose of key workers. When i enquired to the local council (Dyfed) i was informed that apparently that because i was a soldier a didnt qualify. ********. We have also fallen into the trap of morgage companys who will not take my spouses wage into consideration because she gets paid tax free.

We have come to the conclusion that it is no longer a benifit to ourselves to stay in the Military for either financial reasons or stability as we are away so often now that it makes almost impossible to plan a move or even look for a property.

The only option now for most serving soldiers is to emigrate and i can assure you this is happening more and more as countries like Austrlia are willing to take soldiers leaving from the services.

Why am i so rattled. Because i have just watched the news and learnt that the good old school teaching profesion is threatining to go on strike for a further ten percent wage increase because there workers cant afford to buy property. All this plus six or seven weeks paid summer holidays. My heart bleeds for their misfortune.

Get a life and stop holding the UK to ransome.

You could be forgiven for thinking that you were Firemen.

Drew

:ph34r:

Hi Drew,

Welcome to HPC. I am an ex squaddie (ACC, RAPC and then AGC) of 7 years in the Army, (4 of which were spent in Germany too) I left in 1994.

A year before I left the army, I wrote to get on the Council (Coventry) waiting list only to be told I they wouldn't accept my application as I was still living in Army Barracks!!!!! Effectively, I had to apply the day I left the army and on my first day of homelessness.

Its a massive transition going from the Army to 'Civvy Street' and its no wonder that a great deal of our homeless in the UK are ex-forces.

I completely empathise with your situation. All the best.

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The average wage is £25k whether you are public/private/key or not, that also means a good chunk of people earn below that level. Your average worker is simply screwed, big business and government has waged a remorseless class war against workers, they now experience negative real wage growth and a cost of living going through the roof.

However, a minority of people are doing very well and a good number have been bought off in the short-term thanks to MEW and endless debt fueled shopping sprees, but the latter cannot last.

What an incredibly good post. Well said.

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A year before I left the army, I wrote to get on the Council (Coventry) waiting list only to be told I they wouldn't accept my application as I was still living in Army Barracks!!!!! Effectively, I had to apply the day I left the army and on my first day of homelessness.

I forgot to add in Coventry Council's defence (or more a particular employee of the housing support team's hard efforts at the time - Marylin I think her name was) after 6 months of leaving the Army, I did get offered a small 1 bed flat in a high-rise which I was really really glad for.

From then on in, I started to get my life back on track.

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In all seriousness, don't be drawn into the "divide and rule" bull about key workers. We all deserve a decent slice of the UK pie as we all contribute to it (I'm talking about those who actually contribute and those who can't contribute through no fault of their own).

Completely agree. I get absolutely f@#ked off with all this 'key worker' bleating. My take on it is, is the nurses, teachers, police and any other key workers are as much dependant on all the other commercial ancilliary services (Sainsbury's staff, taxi drivers, restaraunt workers, train drivers, bus drivers, plumbers, electricians, builders etc) as they are on them.

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The average wage is £25k whether you are public/private/key or not, that also means a good chunk of people earn below that level. Your average worker is simply screwed, big business and government has waged a remorseless class war against workers, they now experience negative real wage growth and a cost of living going through the roof.

The lower/ average worker is seeing pay levels decrease. I work in a management position in a blue collar industry. We really struggled to recruit before the influx of Eastern Europeans. Since the Poles came there has been no trouble finding staff - even entry level office position attract really good people. The pressure on recruitment is for middle management levels and upwards - thus making the differentials in pay far greater. I really feel for the low skilled workers or those trying to build a skills base.

However, a minority of people are doing very well and a good number have been bought off in the short-term thanks to MEW and endless debt fueled shopping sprees, but the latter cannot last.

A lot of people have done well from lower interest rates whether or not they have MEWed and whether or not they care what their house is worth. They don't see just how expensive life is for people who have to rent at market rates or buy at current prices.

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Why am i so rattled. Because i have just watched the news and learnt that the good old school teaching profesion is threatining to go on strike for a further ten percent wage increase because there workers cant afford to buy property. All this plus six or seven weeks paid summer holidays. My heart bleeds for their misfortune.

Get a life and stop holding the UK to ransome.

What happened to solidarity? You should be right behind them. We should all be right behind anyone who wants a fair wage increase. Now I had little sympathy with the Firemen, it's basically a part-time job and to be honest it's not exactly dangerous these days. In fact I daresay they spend most of their time playing pool and drinking tea.

And to be even more honest I have little sympathy with squaddies, you knew what you were getting into. Or did you just want the foreign travel and skiing? But having said that we all deserve good pay and conditions, and we all deserve our pay to increase with the cost of living we should be supporting anyone (not just so-called key workers). The public have grown decadent and lazy this past 20 years, it's time to wake up and realise that the struggle will always have to be fought.

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What happened to solidarity? You should be right behind them. We should all be right behind anyone who wants a fair wage increase. Now I had little sympathy with the Firemen, it's basically a part-time job and to be honest it's not exactly dangerous these days. In fact I daresay they spend most of their time playing pool and drinking tea.

Maybe, but there are times where you are really called upon, I'm not sure I could go out to many 'jobs' that involve cutting dead or injured teenages out of a wreck of a car without it starting to affect me. The job may involve days of peace then an hour of hell.

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Maybe, but there are times where you are really called upon, I'm not sure I could go out to many 'jobs' that involve cutting dead or injured teenages out of a wreck of a car without it starting to affect me. The job may involve days of peace then an hour of hell.

Days of peace then one hour of hell? They should be paying them by the hour then, not giving them a contracted salary ;)

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And to be even more honest I have little sympathy with squaddies, you knew what you were getting into. Or did you just want the foreign travel and skiing?

You have obviously been taken in by all those glossy adverts because let me assure you, thats all they are.

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Days of peace then one hour of hell? They should be paying them by the hour then, not giving them a contracted salary ;)

The nature of the job doesn't matter, you can be a fireman, nurse, postman or delivery driver earning the medium wage yet all will find that affording basic accommodation is now beyond their reach, we're not talking about a minority of people either, the majority earn £25k or less.

I'm sure the government is surprised this hasn't caused more upset, maybe that's why they play distraction politics in the form of CO2 or whatever the current Guardian ridden public angst current is.

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The nature of the job doesn't matter, you can be a fireman, nurse, postman or delivery driver earning the medium wage yet all will find that affording basic accommodation is now beyond their reach, we're not talking about a minority of people either, the majority earn £25k or less.

I'm sure the government is surprised this hasn't caused more upset, maybe that's why they play distraction politics in the form of CO2 or whatever the current Guardian ridden public angst current is.

I agree completely, I was only joking about the firemen.

It's a bizarre situation really. My sister and her husband bought in 1998. 2 bed mid terrace for £35k, they're just about to trade up using the equity they built up to a place that me and my wife could never afford - even though we earn about 50% more than they do.

I imagine it's the same the country over, young professionals looking on in envy as shelf-stackers and McJobbers who happened to be in the right place at the right time buy houses they can only dream of.

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In all seriousness, don't be drawn into the "divide and rule" bull about key workers. We all deserve a decent slice of the UK pie as we all contribute to it (I'm talking about those who actually contribute and those who can't contribute through no fault of their own).

Excellent post - well said! Thank you.

TD

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I agree completely, I was only joking about the firemen.

It's a bizarre situation really. My sister and her husband bought in 1998. 2 bed mid terrace for £35k, they're just about to trade up using the equity they built up to a place that me and my wife could never afford - even though we earn about 50% more than they do.

Even your sister has been short changed in the grand scheme of things, the price differential between the mid terrace and their dream home is greater now than in 1998, despite all that 'free' equity.

Such a disparity between medium wages and average house prices is going to kill any incentive to work in the longrun, at the lower end of the labour market why struggle to work and pay taxes when you can simply do nothing and have all the necessities provided for you by the welfare state? The more people that take this attitude the greater the tax burden resulting in even less incentive to work.

We have got to the stage where you have to pay to go to university and drop yourself in debt in order to better yourself whilst the state pays an entire underclass to do nothing. It's perverse, NuLabour have killed apsiration and social mobility in this country, stone dead.

Edited by BuyingBear

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No mate, YOU were taken in by the glossy adverts.

With all due respect, I don't think you know me well enough to qualify on why I joined the Army?

I joined the Army early 1998 1988, well before we started seeing these trendy glossy adverts. At the time, the Army offered better job prospects than working in Coventry and a few other personal issues are the reason why I joined, not to go bloody skiing! £340 a month take home pay working in a hotel all hours god sent at the time or a chance to earn a far better wage and move and live away from home? It was a no brainer for me.

And just so that there's no misunderstanding, the point I was trying to get across is that the Army in real life is far from what you might see on the adverts.

Edited to correct getting my decades wrong :P

Edited by bomberbrown

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Even your sister has been short changed in the grand scheme of things, the price differential between the mid terrace and their dream home is greater now than in 1998, despite all that 'free' equity.

Such a disparity between medium wages and average house prices is going to kill any incentive to work in the longrun, at the lower end of the labour market why struggle to work and pay taxes when you can simply do nothing and have all the necessities provided for you by the welfare state? The more people that take this attitude the greater the tax burden resulting in even less incentive to work.

We have got to the stage where you have to pay to go to university and drop yourself in debt in order to better yourself whilst the state pays an entire underclass to do nothing. It's perverse, NuLabour have killed apsiration and social mobility in this country, stone dead.

Again, I agree entirely. Well almost entirely. Although the differential is larger (something I said but she didn't get) I'm not really sure she's been short-changed. She's got £90k of equity and is taking on a mortgage of £110k to trade up. Without worrying about how much interest she's paid on her current place and whatnot she's effectively got a £200k house (at current market rates) for £110k. Even taking into account the stellar HPI we've had that's not a bad deal, very little chance of negative equity in a nominal crash either. The only real issue they've got is if her husband loses his job. Which is IMHO what will ultimately screw them over and make them wish they'd never moved. But for a couple who have genuine job security it would be a no-brainer IMO.

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