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When Antarctica melts a little, you don't want to be near the coast, though. Everything below 100m is in peril, I would say.

Don't have the exact numbers, though.

the current central prediction for sea level rise is about half a metre, although there's a great deal of uncertainty in the predictions, but not more than a metre or so

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When Antarctica melts a little, you don't want to be near the coast, though. Everything below 100m is in peril, I would say.

Don't have the exact numbers, though.

Re: 'Antarctic property hotspots..... I was actually joking there. ;)

Although given the Mongolian example and how long this madness has gone on, who knows what will come to pass.

'Flow to Let' anyone ? :P

http://psc.apl.washington.edu/ISWphotogall...otogallery.html

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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maybe just my interpretation but the programne seemed to be blaming the spanish housing market for the british not having made a fortune

land grabs - well if you buy an illegal property.........

over-development - so new property shouldn't be built to ensure that prices only ever go up?

scare stories keeping people away - common sense maybe?

investors looking for rock-bottom prices - how dare they

i've lost in the markets before - you don't get sympathy or a bail-out - you get over it and get on with it

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A professional psychologist I have known for many years said that many counsellors and life coaches become that in order to work through their own problems, using other people as a proxy.

(typos)

A 'proxy' what?

Oh, sorry, so used to typos on here - you actually mean a 'proxy'.

On the subject of typos - and this is the God's honest truth - I received a flyer from our mates at Inside Track yesterday.

To be fair it was addressed to a previous occupant of the house but as he has done a 'runner' leaving me to sort out the debt-collectors, I now feel it is reasonable to open his junk mail.

In the 'document' it says ....

"Ironically, today there really is a 'crisis' in the housing market - but it's due to a massive shortage of houses and appartments!"

What a bunch of illiterate tosspots. They claim to property experts and can't even spell the word apartment.

Incidentally, that story has been removed from the Daily Mail web site.

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That Mongolia thing is bizarre and should set major alarm bells ringing

Yields have been at 30%, with rapidly appreciating land value & also salaries, rents continues to rise with yields still very high < 20%, making investment a must! The Regency developer has contracts to house a large number of mining company executives, ensuring a maximum annual return for your investment, whilst growth continues fast.

If all of that is true, why the hell are the flats being advertised for sale to Brits? Why isn't the Regency developer renting them out themselves if they hold the contracts? Or if they can't, why hasn't one of these many companies moving in invested in flats? Isn't there anyone in the Mongolian business community who might have spotted this amazing, fantastic opportunity? Or if not Mongolia, someone in China, which is next door and supposedly their wealth is key to all this growth...?

Erm, no...the fact that they're advertising these on PrimeLocation.com to economically dumb Brits suggests there's something pretty nasty going on there :unsure:

Edited by Fergie
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What makes people borrow huge amounts of cash & think they can become property experts (abroad as well),

Stupidity, Greed, Arrogance and Ignorance...at a guess. A very bad combination!

What else do you expect from a nation with a third world education system (note the Tories attitude to educational excellence), where the pinnacle of achievement is to saddle yourself with debt

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Inside Track use MisconDeLaReya solticitors to threaten newspapers with legal action. McKay (IT COO) is a **** :lol:

Maybe this is the beginning of the end for Inside Track. Just think ... they threaten the Daily Mail with legal action ... the Daily Mail decides to send an undercover journalist to one of their free seminars .... pays the £2500 to go on a 'proper' seminar and then writes an expose.

That would be great.

They advertise a lot on LBC radio I think. It sounds like Sarah Beeny's voice - I wonder if it is her?

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Inside Track are a pretty nasty outfit too: their CEO (COO, whatever...) Anthony McKay is a flabby, bad-tempered Australian who couldn`t give a XXXX about anything!

Interestingly enough, after having been so damn stupid and foolish, I actually (head hangs in shame) paid £2500 for their 2-day course: it was total crap. Why did I do this? Because I read the cr*p spouted by Robert Kiyosaki in Rich Dad Poor Dad; I almost went the Casey Serin route!!

After a few visits to McKay to try and get my money back, it was clear that that was going nowhere, so I turned up at the London Hilton Metropole with an `Inside Trick` t-shirt and flyers. Within minutes I was surrounded by their staff (even though I was in a public thoroughfare breaking no laws). After a chat with their senior rep, I was handed his mobile with McKay on the other end - he said I was trying to `extort` money from Inside Track. I stated my line again: give me back my money and I`ll disappear. After returning home, I was called the next day and told by McKay that I`d get a refund (which I did).

Two morals: 1. a fool and his money are soon parted (I`ve wised up a lot since then); 2. if you have given money to Inside Track, go for the negattive publicity route and see if you can `extort` your money back.

Congrads on getting your money back.

Australia has a proud history of property sprikers(conmen) I think there are more over there than here UK

http://www.jenman.com.au/NewsArchives.php?Selected=News

(you will have a laugh)

or on jenman.com.au read all the articles about 100s of spruikers. Also in last year 3 developemnt companies have gone bust e.g http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2006/s1548583.htm

The latest Australian capital Reseve both taking alot of Australian retirees money.

The best of all when I was there was Henry Kaye, he was charging upto $50,000 (20,000 pounds) for property seminars and the people ended up buying new appartmenst he(Henry Kaye) at knock down prices to the clients at over inflated prices. In effect the people paid his course and tuition fees and then bought over inflated property off him.

(Yes People paid from $5000 to $50,000(platinum member) for his courses which were led to buy his over priced developments....GET BROKE QUICK)

Henry Kaye charged with crminal fraud

http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2005/s1528012.htm

The Evil henry Kaye

http://www.jenman.com.au/NewsNews1.php?id=188

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Wasn't that dodgy guy who bought those bristol flats for the Blairs Australian?

Ian Foster or something?

What? After all of Blairs antics over the last 10 years and you accuse that other poor bloke of being dodgy?

Come on...theres no contest!

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Wasn't that dodgy guy who bought those bristol flats for the Blairs Australian?

Ian Foster or something?

I think he is called Peter Foster

http://www.dietscam.org/reports/foster.shtml

These are two other names to look out for Dudley Quinlivan and Chris Bilborough.The experts of two tier property investing in Queensland in the late 90s and early 2000s. Flew in speculators from around Australia and New Zealand and slick saled with plenty of snake oil over inflated property with dummy valuations for the banks. Stsrtas iwth a cold call, then a visit with glossy brochures and telling you a great investment for your retirement. Then a cheap flight to teh Gold Coast and driven round by super slick sales people stating this is the life and you must sign today, you can use our lawyers etc they are independent of course, also guaranteed renters for 2 years. Then you find after 2 years you have no tenants trya nd sell and find the valuation is 30-50% below waht you payed in a booming market.

Possibly this has happened in Spain.They used the timesharing techniques in selling real estate.

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Have a friend of mine in Dublin that has just bought his first btl. He is short each month of 750 euro after getting the rent.Bet his tenant loves him.Even more amazing is that in the next 10 years he wants a total of 5 btls.750x5,now that ends up as a tidy sum.I am gob smacked.

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Inside Track Property Scam

Can't believe these guys are still doing the cirtcuit

Insidetrack.co.uk

Bristol 09/06/07 book

Bristol 10/06/07 book

Wrexham 11/06/07 book

Dorset 11/06/07 book

Cheshire 12/06/07 book

Southampton 12/06/07 book

Warrington 13/06/07 book

Berkshire 13/06/07 book

Middlesex 14/06/07 book

West Midlands 16/06/07 book

West Midlands 17/06/07 book

West Berkshire 18/06/07 book

South Yorkshire 18/06/07 book

Ireland 18/06/07 book

Berkshire 19/06/07 book

They must be running out of place to scam people. Mongolia perhaps ????

"How to get broke quick"

Read below

http://news.tradingcharts.com/futures/6/3/93966736.html

Also I believe they are manipulating the Google search facility for "Inside Tracks Property Scam" keywords

Have they been on WatchDog yet ????

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Inside Track Property Scam

Can't believe these guys are still doing the cirtcuit

Insidetrack.co.uk

Bristol 09/06/07 book

Bristol 10/06/07 book

Wrexham 11/06/07 book

Dorset 11/06/07 book

Cheshire 12/06/07 book

Southampton 12/06/07 book

Warrington 13/06/07 book

Berkshire 13/06/07 book

Middlesex 14/06/07 book

West Midlands 16/06/07 book

West Midlands 17/06/07 book

West Berkshire 18/06/07 book

South Yorkshire 18/06/07 book

Ireland 18/06/07 book

Berkshire 19/06/07 book

They must be running out of place to scam people. Mongolia perhaps ????

"How to get broke quick"

Read below

http://news.tradingcharts.com/futures/6/3/93966736.html

Also I believe they are manipulating the Google search facility for "Inside Tracks Property Scam" keywords

Have they been on WatchDog yet ????

Just type in `inside track rubbish` on Google. BTW - we got a 100% refund after that :) Never again :rolleyes:

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Maybe this is the beginning of the end for Inside Track. Just think ... they threaten the Daily Mail with legal action ... the Daily Mail decides to send an undercover journalist to one of their free seminars .... pays the £2500 to go on a 'proper' seminar and then writes an expose.

That would be great.

They advertise a lot on LBC radio I think. It sounds like Sarah Beeny's voice - I wonder if it is her?

I notice the Daily Mail have removed their online article. I guess Inside Track got to them, they must be as powerful as Amway(Network 21)

So copied below for prosperity will they sue hosuepricecrash.co.uk next

May 27, 2007 (Financial Mail on Sunday - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) -- When Steve and Cate Biddle attended a seminar run by property expert Inside Track, they thought they had found a way of paying off their mortgage before they retired in five years' time. It did not work out like that. This week they will put their home on the market in a desperate attempt to clear their debts.

The financial dilemma faced by the Biddles again highlights the methods used by companies such as Inside Track to encourage investment in property. Consumer watchdog Which? has called for such firms to be regulated. Last year, Inside Track was criticised by the Advertising Standards Authority for making misleading claims.

The company, which denies responsibility for the Biddles' predicament, describes itself as the "UK's leading provider of residential property investment education" and claims to have helped investors plough more than £179 million into property.

The company says its courses, which cost between £2,500 and £5,000, highlight "proven strategies" to make money from property. These include buying properties at discounted prices, making money from capital growth and rental income and building a profitable portfolio. They also show how to use your home to finance property investments.

Steve, 51, a police inspector with 30 years on the force, and his wife Cate, 50, a receptionist, initially attended a free taster seminar run by Inside Track in October 2003 at Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands. Impressed, they paid £2,500 for a two-day seminar at a Holiday Inn in Birmingham.

After hearing that buying property could help them wipe out their mortgage before they retired and attracted by claims that Spanish property prices were set to rise by 30 per cent a year, the couple signed up to buy an off-plan three-bedroom house for 253,000 euros (£171,000).

They say they were encouraged to buy immediately to avoid the normal fee charged by Inside Track to become a member of its "property club."

The deal was struck by mortgage broker Anson Bailey, say Steve and Cate. Its representative then persuaded them to buy a second off-plan three-bedroom house for 230,000 euros. They planned to sell both homes before they were completed.

Inside Track says that Anson Bailey has not been represented at its seminars since mid-2004. Last August, Anson Bailey ceased trading.

The 30 per cent deposits were financed by switching the couple's £65,000 repayment mortgage on their four-bedroom house in Telford, Shropshire, to interest-only and raising it to £162,000. Good incomes allowed them to do this.

Both Spanish properties are on the same development in Rincon de la Victoria, near Malaga on the Costa del Sol. Inside Track received ten per cent of the sales price from the developer. The Biddles were told the first property had been taken so they were given another one in the same development. But the new home was blighted by a huge pylon outside.

Steve complained and was transferred to another property, but again it was inferior. It did not have a sea view and the layout was not as attractive as the first home. After a two-year battle, the developer refunded their deposit. But the Biddles have been saddled with the second property, which they have been unable to sell despite all the assurances.

As a result, they have a Spanish interest-only mortgage for 190,000 euros while the mortgage on their Telford home, where they have lived for 14 years, stands at £112,000 after the refund of the deposit on the first property. The couple had owed £65,000 on their UK house before buying the Spanish properties.

The Biddles tried to take legal action against Inside Track only to be told that the Spanish contract is between them and the developer and not Inside Track. Steve says: "We were persuaded into buying these properties. We were repeatedly told the market was expected to rise by 30 per cent a year and that we would easily be able to clear our mortgage by selling the properties off-plan. That happy scenario hasn't panned out. Instead, we are living a nightmare."

Inside Track "vigorously disputes" most of the Biddles" claims. In a written statement, it says: "We pride ourselves on the quality of our staff and invest significant sums in training and development.

"Inside Track has always advocated a strategy of buying property off-plan, building a portfolio and then holding the property for the medium to long term to maximise capital growth. It has never advocated a strategy of speculation, trading or selling prior to completion."

And the company says it has been "very open" about the potential risks of property investment and denies links with Anson Bailey, the broker that advised the Biddles. It states: "Anson Bailey attended some of our seminars where they offered services to attendees. But Inside Track would not be privy to any discussions between Anson Bailey and a client."

Inside Track holds around 50 two-day seminars a year with an average of 600 people attending each one. It claims most customers, unlike the Biddles, are happy. Customer feedback shows the average score for "value for money" is 7.8 out of ten. But the firm is investigating some 30 customer complaints.

Lobby group Which? is critical of firms such as Inside Track. Spokeswoman Teresa Fritz says: "Seminars such as these are overpriced and offer customers little information that they could not already find for free on the internet or from organisations such as the Association of Residential Letting Agents.

"If this was any other type of investment, it would be regulated, but because it is property investment it falls between regulatory gaps.

"The only redress is through the courts and in the Biddles' case they did not even have this."

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To be fair, if they were dumb enough to buy a house in Spain with a 'guaranteed' 30% annual increase in price, I can't help but feel they deserve a dose of reality.

Remember: if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is... and no-one in their right mind is going to give you 'free money' by selling you a house that's guaranteed to be worth 30% more next year.

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