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How long before Antarctica is seen as a property hotspot ?

'Due to global warming there is less & less of Anarctica every year, forcing prices up, so buy now before it's too late ' :rolleyes:

When Antarctica melts a little, you don't want to be near the coast, though. Everything below 100m is in peril, I would say.

Don't have the exact numbers, though.

Edited by Goldfinger
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Guest Cletus VanDamme
hello CVD, has your opinion changed yet as to whether prime/central Londinium prices will drop, or do you still think that they will remain unaffected ??

Hi GOM, thanks for the welcome. I still think the 'old money' parts of London will hold up compared to the rest. I think some smarter parts of Hackney might even weather the storm pretty well - London Fields being the new Notting Hill for example.

The midrange houses and flats in the suburbs though should be hit pretty hard. For example, when I bought my first house in North London in 2000 the price differential moving from 2-beds to 3-beds was about 25K. Now it's more like 100K. I would expect 3-bed houses, currently selling for about 380K, to be hit harder than 2-beds, which, comparatively, have risen less over the last 7 years and in fact represent far better value when you compare them to flats. Case in point, 2-bed victorian terraced houses round my way, around 275K, 2-bed new-build flats, around 260K.

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Guest grumpy-old-man
Hi GOM, thanks for the welcome. I still think the 'old money' parts of London will hold up compared to the rest. I think some smarter parts of Hackney might even weather the storm pretty well - London Fields being the new Notting Hill for example.

The midrange houses and flats in the suburbs though should be hit pretty hard. For example, when I bought my first house in North London in 2000 the price differential moving from 2-beds to 3-beds was about 25K. Now it's more like 100K. I would expect 3-bed houses, currently selling for about 380K, to be hit harder than 2-beds, which, comparatively, have risen less over the last 7 years and in fact represent far better value when you compare them to flats. Case in point, 2-bed victorian terraced houses round my way, around 275K, 2-bed new-build flats, around 260K.

It will be interesting to see what happens in Prime London I must admit.

btw that was a very honest post you did the other week, it took some guts. :)

edited - yes, I think it was your good friend PG that called Q1 2007 first. ;) but I called it the most. :rolleyes:

Edited by grumpy-old-man
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this bit susm it up for me:

"they paid £2,500 for a two-day seminar at a Holiday Inn in Birmingham." :blink:

so to reiterate, £2500 for someone to stand there & say, the property in Spain that you will purchase from us ;) , will go up in value by 30% per year. Greedy people get what they deserve, I don't feel a bit sorry for them. DYOR :lol:

eidted to add - there will be a lot more brits that will be in this situation. Almost everyone we speak to has a "holiday home" in somewhere sunnyville. The lady that cuts my hair sometimes has a btl in the UK & one abroad, bought within the last 3 years. She is a hairdresser & her husband is a labourer. :blink::blink:

I've no sympathy whatsoever.

They were happy to accept a 30% return on their investment - which means whoever bought their "Spanish investment" was also kindly paying off their mortgage.

But when things go wrong, they can't accept it.

Typical of the UK today.

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Oh 'life coach', means that gippo Carole Caplin shite - peace, love and lentils, incense candles, shark tooth earrings and all that crap. The only difference between that and an unemployment statistic is that there appear to be enough morons with a distorted money to sense ratio who are actually willing to pay for their services.

Bang on! I'm firmly of the belief that the way to make money today is to exploit thick, status-hungry rich people. So Britain's growth industries should be "life coaches", beauticians, MINI accessory dealers, people who sell coats for small dogs, and fake tan manufacturers ;)

Edited for spelling

Edited by Sir Talbot Avenger
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How long before Antarctica is seen as a property hotspot ?

'Due to global warming there is less & less of Anarctica every year, forcing prices up, so buy now before it's too late ' :rolleyes:

Get in on GREENLAND - once all the ice melts it`ll be pure tropicana! :lol:

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North of Cyprus?

That will be a minefield for land claims by the dispossessd Greek Cypriots for the next hundred years. Anyone who buys on the north coast is absolutely stupid - they need to read up on the 1974 Turkish invasion and its aftermath to see that the ownership of land siezed by the Turks has never been officially ratified internationally.

Sheer lunacy.

Well done, Red Baron...Good to see someone knows the score out there. Try telling this to the hundreds/thousands of Brits who fly to Larnaca and get whisked off to the North by dodgy 'estate agents' and shown properties which have been built on Greek owned land.

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Word is that Mongolia is going to be the next property hotspot. Remember you heard it here first:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article1813864.ece

The fact that most of the population live in these is apparently not seen as a problem:

yurt.jpg

Edit:

Here's a quote from the article:

Please tell me this isn't true... :lol::lol:

Lord Newborough, 57, an organic farmer who lives in the Welsh Marches, has, with his wife Susan, 58, bought two three-bedroom penthouses in Ulan Bator for £152,000.

Mongolia's GDP per capita is $546, making it 143rd in the world. And they are really spending £76000 on a flat out there...

And here are the grim apartments:

http://www.primelocation.com/international.../ptfr999000268/

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Please tell me this isn't true... :lol::lol:

Mongolia's GDP per capita is $546, making it 143rd in the world. And they are really spending £76000 on a flat out there...

And here are the grim apartments:

http://www.primelocation.com/international.../ptfr999000268/

Ooh those are luuurvley. From the article again:

Jeremy anticipates rental income will bring an annual 20% of what he paid for the property in addition to the 20% annual capital growth.
:blink:
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Ooh those are luuurvley. From the article again:

:blink:

Jeremy anticipates rental income will bring an annual 20% of what he paid for the property in addition to the 20% annual capital growth.

Jeremy expects to let apartments in Mongolia for £1200 a month. That is 4 times the GDP per capita of the country, per month.

The properties may be let to ex-pats, where a lack of supply of Western-style accommodation can drive up prices, but in a vast country like Mongolia, the supply can appear almost instantly if people are really prepared to pay that kind of money.

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Ooh those are luuurvley. From the article again:

:blink:

Don't laugh. One of the pump and dumpers suggested Mongolia a month or so ago over on the Overseas Property Forum. :lol:

I love the sales patter for those apartments. "Ambassadors (embassies & consulates) creating enormous demand on high-grade accommodation." :blink::lol::lol::lol::lol::blink:

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Going back to the unfortunate couple in the article once again, I read that in the paper this afternoon, then re-read it looking for the part which tells you what had actually gone wrong. Is the Mail writer assuming that we've all read the articles from late April about the Spanish property market collapse? In many ways I rather hope that's true. It gives me a warm feeling to think the mainstream media now take property market collapse for granted...

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One for Converted Lurker!

I remember creating a bit of a stir when I started a thread and suggested that the prime mover behind the debt/housing bubble has been the feather-bedded and cosseted public sector workers. Which other group could be so far attached from economic realities, the forces of globalisation, the reduction in job quality and future income streams to be suckered into this money trap so easily? Of course there are city high-flyers and others that have splashed out money, but this pyramid scam needed millions of sheep to truly work.

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/mortgages/hom...id=505&ct=5

Costa catastrophe

Helen Loveless, Mail on Sunday

27 May 2007

When Steve and Cate Biddle attended a seminar run by property expert Inside Track, they thought they had found a way of paying off their mortgage before they retired in five years' time.

It did not work out like that. This week they will put their home on the market in a desperate attempt to clear their debts

This is a human tragedy.

The tragic thing is that a complete naive fool like this guy can hold down a job paid for by taxpayers for 30 years and then milk the taxpayer for his pension for the rest of his natural life. Its also tragic that they could be so crushingly dim as to believe a story like "property will go up by 30%". The pair of them should weep for their stupidity.

On the plus side they wanted to be mortgage free within 5 years and they have achieved it. Only problem is that they have achieved it by losing their family home. If there is any justice, another couple who specialise in BTL will spot their misery and offer them 50% of their asking price. When that happens, the Biddles can take heart that there are still opportunities out there to get cheap property when you know where to look - only its their house that has become the bargain!!

:lol::lol::lol:

Edited by HPC Convert
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Schadenfreude, don't ya just love it..........

Why on earth should anyone empathise with someone who should have known better than to invest in a pyramid selling scheme and then has the effrontery to bleat about their loss. For Chrissakes, it's not as if he was some bleeding Albanian?

Two pictures from the original article :-

Before :-

fatcat4_60x60.jpg

After :-

Biddle_100x110.jpg

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Guest grumpy-old-man
Two pictures from the original article :-

Before :-

fatcat4_60x60.jpg

After :-

Biddle_100x110.jpg

that's why I have no sympathy for these types of people. Greedy people get what they deserve imo!!

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I have no sympathy for them. They took a gamble and lost, so what. I went to the bookies the other day and made a bet, and I lost, so what, I dont expect my money back.

I love these real life examples of bulls failing. Look at their faces, look how upset they are. :lol::lol::lol:

Saraya Beg

Konnie Huq

Steve & Cate Biddle

Keep the real life examples coming, I fecking love 'em.

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Biddle_100x110.jpg

I just love the expression on the faces of these two.

It should be used in Government wealth warning posters with the caption.

"Do you think you have what it takes to become a millionaire, think again dumbass"

For a while now I have been wanting to make my own posters/signs and fasten them to lamp posts or sign posts on A roads, for all passing motorists to see.

I went to the lakes this weekend, drove all the way up the A65. Imagine a poster like described in the quote above on signs every 20 miles or so.

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  • 440 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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