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Oecd Warns On Risk Of Higher Inflation

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OECD said: “There may even be a case for additional tightening in the UK.”

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/a8b4a952-094c-11dc...0b5df10621.html

The ‘horse has already bolted’, putting ‘the genie back in the bottle’ will not be so easy etc. etc…

It surprises me that it’s taken so long for this sort of advice to come out, the term ‘runaway inflation’ does not come from nothing, the central bankers took a very short term view in keeping interest rate low for so long and increasing the money supply, bringing all this back down will hurt a lot of people.

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http://www.ft.com/cms/s/a8b4a952-094c-11dc...0b5df10621.html

The ‘horse has already bolted’, putting ‘the genie back in the bottle’ will not be so easy etc. etc…

It surprises me that it’s taken so long for this sort of advice to come out, the term ‘runaway inflation’ does not come from nothing, the central bankers took a very short term view in keeping interest rate low for so long and increasing the money supply, bringing all this back down will hurt a lot of people.

http://www.theage.com.au/news/business/for...9601576089.html

THE Paris-based OECD has forecast another interest rate rise for Australia later this year, in a hard-hitting new report warning that the world economy is at risk of spinning out of control.

OECD chief economist Jean-Philippe Cotis warns that the underlying imbalances are getting worse rather than better, and urges governments to reduce risks by cutting spending, not taxes.

In particular, he warns, the US is at risk of "stagflation" — its economy overheating despite slowing productivity growth.

For Australia, the OECD predicts growth to average 3.3 per cent in 2007 and 2008, including a rebound in farm output as the drought ends. It says this is close to Australia's maximum potential growth rate.

Walls of money looking for a home!

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OECD chief economist Jean-Philippe Cotis warns that the underlying imbalances are getting worse rather than better, and urges governments to reduce risks by cutting spending, not taxes

what about doing both :angry:

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what about doing both :angry:

New Labour seem to be in a tax frenzy at the moment.

A new tax idea seems to be muted every day!

Roads, rubbish bins, HIPS.

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It surprises me that it’s taken so long for this sort of advice to come out, the term ‘runaway inflation’ does not come from nothing, the central bankers took a very short term view in keeping interest rate low for so long and increasing the money supply, bringing all this back down will hurt a lot of people.

You're right. Runaway inflation in house prices will continue indefinitely.

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