Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

When The Things You Own, Start To Own You, I See It, Do You?


Recommended Posts

Yes. An excellent post.

What a way to spend one's life......... waiting for the next credit card bill to drop through the letter box

I have a couple of basic laws I live by........

I never borrow money from banks

I have no credit cards

I live very modestly

If I want something, I save for it

OK! So I'm never going to own a flash car. WTF

People have lost touch with reality. They can't understand that you don't own material things. THEY OWN YOU! There is a responsibility that goes with these things. If you own an expensive car, you have to pay alot of money to run it and maintain it.....all just to maintain your ego.

I still haven't got one of those fancy flat panel TV's and for one very good reason

Why would I buy a big expensive flat panel TV to watch the utter shite they broadcast on TV...... in fact I'm considering getting rid of my TV altogether. I so rarely watch these day

That`s for sure - the TV on `offer` seems to consist of cr8p property porn, cr8p food programmes and even cr8ppier `reality` tv. It`s utter dross - only BBC2 and CH4 seem to have anything worth watching on rare occasions. :(

In fact the same can be said for the internet now - this is one of the very few sites that I visit on a daily basis: I use it as a `bu**sh1t antidote` to the VI rubbish in the media. There is very little of value on the net at the moment (except for e-commerce).

Edited by southsea13
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest mattsta1964
That`s for sure - the TV on `offer` seems to consist of cr8p property porn, cr8p food programmes and even cr8ppier `reality` tv. It`s utter dross - only BBC2 and CH4 seem to have anything worth watching on rare occasions. :(

In fact the same can be said for the internet now - this is one of the very few sites that I visit on a daily basis: I use it as a `bu**sh1t antidote` to the VI rubbish in the media. There is very little of value on the net at the moment (except for e-commerce).

I have to disagree with you there. There's some fantastic stuff on the internet if you go looking for it. The internet is the last bastion of freedom. The media don't report the news anymore. They manufacture it. There are increasing numbers of people coming on websites like this to get a more accurate picture of what's going on.

If you doubt the power of the internet, just read about Ron Paul's presidental campaign. Donations to his campaign have grown from $600,000 to $5 million dollars in less than a month.....all thanks to the internet!! He is totally censored by the mainstream media. He is one of the most searched for news stories on Digg, Technorati, and YouTube

No wonder they want to control the internet!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend emigrating: once you have to pack up everything you own to ship it thousands of miles you soon realise how much crap you have that you don't really need.

Personally I'm aiming to eliminate as many non-digital things as possible... carrying a few terabytes of stuff around on hard disks is much easier than carrying around a few tons of 'real' stuff.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have to disagree with you there. There's some fantastic stuff on the internet if you go looking for it. The internet is the last bastion of freedom. The media don't report the news anymore. They manufacture it. There are increasing numbers of people coming on websites like this to get a more accurate picture of what's going on.

I don't know whether it was shown on TV, but I was watching an interesting video yesterday by John Pilger about where much of the 'things' people own have been coming from:

http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=-79...rld+John+Pilger

I'm no socialist, but if what he's saying is true then the way companies are treating their workers in Asia is appalling. If the cost of labour is really only a few pence on a pair of trainers that sell for tens of pounds, they could easily double wages or more and pass the extra few pence onto purchasers in the West.

Plus he makes the World Bank spokespeople look like idiots so it's worth watching for that alone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought this might be relevant to this thread. If you've got a spare 10 minutes treat yourself to a read of this excellent short story

http://www.vb-tech.co.za/ebooks/Sheckley%2...7877ded28aa94f5

(easiest to copy the text into Word to read, as the text doesn't wordwrap in a browser).

from Robert Sheckley, written in 1954

At the height of his writing activity, Robert Sheckley was one of the most prolific and consistently good authors in science fiction. Most of his early fiction reads as well today as it did when it was written in the fifties and sixties, especially his stories with social themes, and he is still going strong. Sheckley is in many ways a bitter writer with an acid pen, very much anti-establishment and in favor of the nonconformist. He has little use for large institutions that push people around and control their lives (see his "The Academy"). At the same time, his view of human nature is basically pessimistic.

"Something for Nothing" recalls one of Robert A. Heinlein's favorite expressions: TANSTAAFL, or "there ain't no such thing as a free lunch.'' Modern marketing practices and techniques usually offer less than they promise. Here Sheckley gives us a tale about greed and the acquisitive process, featuring a protagonist who gets somewhat more than he bargained for.

A twist on the genie in the bottle story, with a beautifully satisfying ending. Don't be put off if you don't do SF, this is a witty and satiric commentary on human nature, and very relevant to the buy now pay later\never culture of today.

Fight club = one of the great films of the last 10 years. It even correctly points the finger at the banks.

good film, and the closing track as the buildings collapse at the end, is Pixies excellent 'Where is my mind' off the Surfer Rosa album.

TLM

Edit: tidied format

Edited by trompe le monde
Link to post
Share on other sites
This is not a rant about house prices, but the state of peoples finances

do you see it? everyday I see it

do you hear it? everyday I hear it

A few months back.... conversations over dinner, down the local or coffee with friends

My house is worth £xxxxxx, so I've borrowed against it's equity........

We have a new car

We have the just bought a 42' plasma TV

2 family holidays abroad

a plastic conservatory

B&Q decking in the garden

A while ago I was in a staff Ar53 kicking meeting, it was quite intense with threats made about mass sackings and the like. At the end the boss (and I mean the BIG boss) asked if anyone had anything they'd like to say. To paraphrase myself "Who else got lucky this morning before coming to work? Hold up your hands.... Well get some more this arvo or in the next 1/2 hour i'm pretty damn happy" - Lightened the mood considerably and yes, that afternoon I had some more fun.

Some define the good life as the goods life

Affluenza pge37

Stuff seems to require more stuff

Ellen Goodman "All Consuming Passion" 1998

Normal is getting dressed in clothes that you buy for work, driving through traffic in a car that you still are paying for in order to get to the job that you need so you can pay for the clothes, car and house that you leave empty all day in order to afford to live in it.

Possesion Overload - Where you have so many things that you find your life is taken up with looking after things instead of people - Coined by Dr Swanso

Link to post
Share on other sites

totally agree, I actually wrote a little column for the London Paper (they take unpaid submissions) on this theme. The thing that tipped me over the edge was an advert on the side of a bus for some rubbish weekly magazine - the tagline was "born to shop?"

what have we become. look at the current skank on BB (I don't but hear of it) and it's all about being "a celebrity" or a "WAG"

the level of selfishness and greed has got to come to an end. I actually think it will with the Green revolution; it's already becoming slightly gauche to drive a big car and go on too many holidays. This plus the increasing concerns over recycling will cause people to not look down on 2nd hand so much (although I still have disheartening conversations with my colleague who has a new baby and whose wife wants everything new - even though they grow out of it in one month!)

Incidentally, the response to my article was "how arrogant of yesterdays columnist to pontificate about what people spend their money on" - guilt & denial I fear

:-)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Bart of Darkness
totally agree, I actually wrote a little column for the London Paper (they take unpaid submissions) on this theme. The thing that tipped me over the edge was an advert on the side of a bus for some rubbish weekly magazine - the tagline was "born to shop?"

Reminds me of this line from 12 Monkeys.

Surely there is very real and very convincing data that the planet cannot survive the excesses of the human race: proliferation of atomic devices, uncontrolled breeding habits, the rape of the environment, the pollution of land, sea, and air. In this context, isn't it obvious that "Chicken Little" represents the sane vision and that Homo Sapiens' motto, "Let's go shopping!" is the cry of the true lunatic?
Link to post
Share on other sites
Indeed. As Chomsky said:

"Seek wealth, gaining all but self"

In fact this whole issue has been eating me up of late. For me theirs a certain dichotemy at the heart of home-ownership, individual freedom and slavery all in one. We live in an aspirational society. Maybe thats why we have one of the highest 'OO' rates in the world, why we're seduced to work all day to buy shit we dont need, why we spend time on sites like this. We're as complicit in this as the media.

Link to post
Share on other sites
That is so true. I have friends who have bought loads of crap because of the cheap credit they were able to get. The problem is that they look at the monthly repayment figure and not the total cost of ownership/repayment. If they can afford it each month then they will have it. My brain actually hurts when I try to think of the rationality going through their heads. Why don't people save anymore? Why is debt seen as a 'normal' thing?

All this consumerism just sucks! I find it extremely depressing when I see people buy crap just to make them feel better about their crappy lives. If they want to fill their lives with drab plastic stuff, they should get off their @rse and earn the money to pay for it. Hell, if they had to pay for this 'crap' with hard cash I bet they wouldn't part with the money. Its all about the psychology of credit cards, its like you are not spending 'real' money because its just numbers on a statement.

I honestly believe that 90% of this country hasn't a clue about money or finance! Bring back Home Economics!

I'm afraid that there are a lot of gullible people out there who are seduced by advertising. Adverts for totally rubbish, but of course expensive, products which are purported to be the next most 'stylish' (God, how I hate that word) thing are constantly being thrust in their naive little faces, and they are taken in. They think that celebrities (who are actually mostly basically chavs and hookers) are what they should emulate, despite the fact that the vast majority of these people have achieved nothing useful to society and are just lining their own pockets.

We all want nice lives, but do it within your means. If you want the champagne lifestyle, go out and earn it first.

The people who are sucked into this shallow sort of thing - and worse, borrow money to achieve it - are just stupid and deserve everything they get. :angry:

Link to post
Share on other sites

And there was this from last week's Observer.

Shopping? They just don't buy it

Here's a morsel from the top of the article - use the link to read the rest.

More than 8,000 people are helping the planet by curbing consumerism, writes Jon Robins

Sunday June 3, 2007

The Observer

'I'm kind of worried about what to get my mum. Her birthday's coming up,' admits Rachel Kesel, a 26-year-old geography student at San Francisco State University. The reason for the anxiety is that she is six months into a one-year pledge not to buy anything new - underwear and a few other essentials aside.

Kesel and 10 of her friends bought no new items in 2006, and many have renewed the 'compact', as their pledge is called, this year. Their abstinence includes not buying presents, which makes birthdays a challenge. In the past, Kesel has given creative non-materialistic gifts or donations to good causes. 'I just don't think my mum gets why I'm doing this,' she says. 'She knows I love her, but she's going to think I'm such an ungrateful brat.'

This form of 'compact' is now spreading over here. I'm even thinking of doing it for myself.

The problem is that I spend most of my money on services which can't be bought second-hand. ;)

And here's a link to the movement starters. http://sfcompact.blogspot.com/

edited with link.

Edited by redwing
Link to post
Share on other sites

I love fight club, it blew me away. As for another great anti-consumerism film (indirectly but in a cute funny way) try The Gods Must Be Crazy, another great film.

Don't get too depressed with consumerism folks. Live in your own 'happy place' and ignore the debt loving sheeple and mega corporations advertising bo**ox. Stand back and watch the hangover of the debt fuelled party come to an end. Its going to be fun and messy.

Stuff can be fun, but it never lives up to the dream the advert tries to sell you...

;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.