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ImA20SomethingGetMeOutOfHere

What's Your Cpi?

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The topic of the Consumer Price Index is one which frequently causes much debate on this forum with many posters feeling that the statistics are fiddled in some way or do not represent the true picture. Many also feel that their own personal experience of inflation is that it is much higher than the official 2.7% figure. To try and see whether or not this is the case I thought it might be fun to try and see if I could write a web site which could perform CPI calculations independant of the Office for National Statistics, and here it is.

Behold the CPI Calculatron!!

http://asbr26803.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/

Now before you go and click the link (you didn't just click it did you - oh dear!). I feel some explanation is in order. I just knocked this up this evening so it's a bit rough and ready and lacks some of the more advanced features found on many websites like colour or instructions so I'd better explain how it works.

CPI is calculated by looking at a basket of goods and seeing what their price is compared to the same time last year as a percentage of some reference value (prices in 2005 sometime I think). Each item is also assigned a weight as a fraction of 1000 so that the total weighting always adds up to 1000. The CPI figure is then calculated by multiplying the price of each item by its weighting and then adding up all the results and dividing by 1000. This produces a number like 103.4 which was November's CPI. The inflation figure is then calculated by subtracting the CPI from 12 months ago and expressing the results as a percentage change. Phew!

The CPI Calculatron works by allowing the user to type in his or her own weightings and therefore calculate their own personal CPI figure. To do this, all you need to do is type in how much money you spend on each category of things each month and press the 'calculate' button at the bottom of the page. The page will work out your own weightings and will then calculate your own CPI figure based on how much the ONS says each of these things has gone up by.

For what it's worth, my CPI figure came out at a bit over 9%.

Also, this page uses JavaScript so it may produce a security warning in your browser which you need to OK before it will work. This is also a pre-alpha rush job lash up, so if you break it don't come whining to me!

Enjoy!

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I don't understand CPI either but if you think about it there's still plently of people out there who were lucky enough to buy property 20 years ago and now have a £20,000 mortgage.

Unfortunately for me nearly 60% of my income goes to pay the mortgage and houshold bills which makes my CPI extremely high.

For example my parents purchased there house (now worth over £375,000) for just £2000.00 in the 1960s. They still work and earn in excess of £76,000 between them and have no mortgage at all so there CPI must be very low.

If you were stupid like me and left buying a house until your 30s then unfortunately we're going to have a hard time right up until retirement.

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I don't understand CPI either but if you think about it there's still plently of people out there who were lucky enough to buy property 20 years ago and now have a £20,000 mortgage.

Unfortunately for me nearly 60% of my income goes to pay the mortgage and houshold bills which makes my CPI extremely high.

For example my parents purchased there house (now worth over £375,000) for just £2000.00 in the 1960s. They still work and earn in excess of £76,000 between them and have no mortgage at all so there CPI must be very low.

If you were stupid like me and left buying a house until your 30s then unfortunately we're going to have a hard time right up until retirement.

Remember that morgtgage interest payments are not included in the CPI. The "Housing, Water and Fuels" bit is basically rent and utility bills and I don't think it includes council tax either.

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Remember that morgtgage interest payments are not included in the CPI. The "Housing, Water and Fuels" bit is basically rent and utility bills and I don't think it includes council tax either.

If that is true then the figure are fixed as the CPI figures don't account for the biggest bill....a mortgage. As fewer and fewer people rent the CPI figure are likely to remain steady.

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If that is true then the figure are fixed as the CPI figures don't account for the biggest bill....a mortgage. As fewer and fewer people rent the CPI figure are likely to remain steady.

3.6% for me.... Not bad actually though I am a miserly git and don't like to spend much cash...

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Listen to "You and Yours" tomorrow on Radio 4 at 12noon. They are going to be talking about whether inflation is more than the official figures for some people.

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Listen to "You and Yours" tomorrow on Radio 4 at 12noon. They are going to be talking about whether inflation is more than the official figures for some people.

just done ours. 5.5% . ps Get itv news on now.

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7.2%

The official weightings are in lala land. I can't believe how low the weighting is on housing/water & fuels! And how many people do you know who spend £1.50 on Recreation & Culture for every £1 spent on housing/energy?

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  • 314 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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