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The Anger And Frustration Is Overwhelming On The Bbc Website

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Today more than any other time i really started to believe that there are forces in this Country that go well beyond just being a little naughty with their spin machine.

I allways knew that politicians tell lies, are decitefull, and sometimes keep the truth from us, i allways take what the medaia say with a large pinch of salt, i thought there was always a hint of truth in their storys.

But today i looked at the comments by the public on the BBC website about the interest rate rise, and the amount of anger and unhappiness that is going on out there(if you have not seen it yet i suggest you do, it is worth it).

There is no way that anger is being reflected in todays media, it is about time that they got a grip.

I truly think we are heading for a breakdown in our society, i could feel the stress and pain in some of those comments.

I was advised by someone on this site to watch the film V for vendata, i now know why.

Sam

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I was advised by someone on this site to watch the film V for vendata, i now know why.

the film V - what? the one where mouse-gobbling alien lizards come to earth to steal our water disguised as 80's bimbos?

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Today more than any other time i really started to believe that there are forces in this Country that go well beyond just being a little naughty with their spin machine.

I allways knew that politicians tell lies, are decitefull, and sometimes keep the truth from us, i allways take what the medaia say with a large pinch of salt, i thought there was always a hint of truth in their storys.

But today i looked at the comments by the public on the BBC website about the interest rate rise, and the amount of anger and unhappiness that is going on out there(if you have not seen it yet i suggest you do, it is worth it).

There is no way that anger is being reflected in todays media, it is about time that they got a grip.

I truly think we are heading for a breakdown in our society, i could feel the stress and pain in some of those comments.

I was advised by someone on this site to watch the film V for vendata, i now know why.

Sam

The BBC, being a propganda unit of the government and managed by Gordon's Brother-in-law, do not broadcast anti-HPI information. They wouldn't even touch the BIG story on mortgages this week:

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/mortgages/mor...p;in_page_id=58

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Why are they angry? Did they expect their mortgage rates to stay static for 25 years.

For fu*k sake some people should get a grip. IF YOU CANT AFFORD A FEW PERCENTAGE RISE IN IR

DONT BUY A FU**ING HOUSE!!!!

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Why are they angry? Did they expect their mortgage rates to stay static for 25 years.

For fu*k sake some people should get a grip. IF YOU CANT AFFORD A FEW PERCENTAGE RISE IN IR

DONT BUY A FU**ING HOUSE!!!!

Maybe they did, but I bet you they'll have the ear of politicians. Like it or not, you can expect future policies to pander to the home-owners. The fact that FTBs are being screwed over won't matter.

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I don't trust comments on the BBC website as they are only posted by a tiny fraction of society and there would probably be just as much anguish if the governent put 1p on the cost of a packet of fags.

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the film V - what? the one where mouse-gobbling alien lizards come to earth to steal our water disguised as 80's bimbos?

No, silly, V for vendetta, where the BNP the Norsefire party take control of the UK and Stephen Fry who owns copy of the Qur'an shelters Princess Amidala while she plots with Guy Fawkes to blow up the London underground.

I kid you not. Good film though.

frugalista

Edited by frugalista

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No, silly, V for vendetta, where the BNP the Norsefire party take control of the UK and Stephen Fry who owns copy of the Qur'an shelters Princess Amidala while she plots with Guy Fawkes to blow up the London underground.

I kid you not. Good film though.

frugalista

on my 'must see' list!

the film V - what? the one where mouse-gobbling alien lizards come to earth to steal our water disguised as 80's bimbos?

on David Icke's 'shouldn't have watched' list

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Can I suggest that people reccomend this comment on the have your say as I'd really like to see it at the top:

"The bankers own the earth. Take it away from them, but leave them the power to create money, and with the flick ofa pen they will create enough money to buy it back again. However, take away from them the power to create money, and all the great fortunes like mine will disappear, and they OUGHT to disappear, for this would be a happier and better world to live in. But, if you wish to remain the slaves of bankers and pay the cost of your own slavery, let them continue to create money." Sir Josiah Stamp, former Director of the Bank of England

[PropogandaMatrix], London, United Kingdom

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Did you forget your medication today?

I see that naivete abounds:

http://www.citywire.co.uk/Blogs/Investment...VersionID=86542

This is more than a coincidence
Today's top news includes;.
* Bank of England raises interest rates to 5%. No surprises, says the Sunday Times' David Smith. My only regret is that the
BBC's insufferably smug Evan Davies won't be forced to eat the Bank of England's press release announcing unchanged rates, as he promised last night.
* 'House prices raced ahead again in October, clocking up the fastest monthly increase for six months and indicating that today’s expected rate rise has not dampened the enthusiasm of Britons for property investment, according to a key survey'.
Full story here.
Are they by any chance related? Of course they are:
'Howard Archer, chief UK and European economist at Global Insight, the financial analysts, said that the Halifax figures were likely to be of "significant concern" to the Bank of England.
''If house prices continue to post sharp rises over the coming months, it will increase pressure for the Bank to lift interest rates further in 2007,' he said.'

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Can I suggest that people reccomend this comment on the have your say as I'd really like to see it at the top:

Already done! In fact I've recommended twelve of the comments that are currently on the front page (out of 15)

I feel Rudyard's comment deserves its top place though:

"This is going to push me over the edge - I'm mortgaged to the hilt and have maxed out every credit card I own - the minimum repayments alone are crippling me. - King of Reason

I'm sorry but you'll get no sympathy from me. You were stupid to take on a level of debt that would be crippling should interest rates move up a point or two. Part of the reason house prices are so high is because fools like you are prepared to over stretch and take on ridiculous debt. If folk applied some sense and refrained then we wouldn't all have to suffer house prices at 8 times average salary. What was wrong with a cheaper house? As for credit cards - give me a break and stay away from the high street!"

Say it like it is! :D

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I like this one its very insensitive of the BOE to rise rates it should have happened a while back to stop inflation getting to the state it is now.

Looks like the plastic will have to get a bit of hammering over christmas to cover the rate rise!!

"These interest rate rises are very insensitive, most people struggle to cope anyway bearing in mind the cost of living compared to the average salary. Christmas is 7 weeks away, this is now an extra burden for most people trying to enjoy this time of year. There are the obvious economical reason why this is done, but no-one seems to think average the average Joe that this affects. Thanks very much!!!!

Laura, Reading"

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the film V - what? the one where mouse-gobbling alien lizards come to earth to steal our water disguised as 80's bimbos?

:lol: No, not as good as that surely..

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I like this one its very insensitive of the BOE to rise rates it should have happened a while back to stop inflation getting to the state it is now.

Looks like the plastic will have to get a bit of hammering over christmas to cover the rate rise!!

"These interest rate rises are very insensitive, most people struggle to cope anyway bearing in mind the cost of living compared to the average salary. Christmas is 7 weeks away, this is now an extra burden for most people trying to enjoy this time of year. There are the obvious economical reason why this is done, but no-one seems to think average the average Joe that this affects. Thanks very much!!!!

Laura, Reading"

Quite a few on this line...

Gordon Brown's r-u-i-n-e-d our Christmas!!

How insensitive! How very dare he!

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Everyone should be absolutely clear that policies that support spiralling house prices are policies that are transfering wealth from non-house owners and people moving up the chain to house owners at the top of the chain. The chain stops with our parents who are the net beneficiaries.

This goverment has suceeded in dividing the country, but not along political lines, instead it has chosen to make some people wealthy at the expense of others. So have no illusions, this Labor party is for the wealthy and for themselves.

Hogs around a trough!

Edited by bpw

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Guest X-QUORK

Quite a few on this line...

Gordon Brown's r-u-i-n-e-d our Christmas!!

How insensitive! How very dare he!

Well, maybe if they'd saved a little every month into one of those Christmas hamper schemes they wouldn't be fretting about using their credit cards.

Oh no, hold on... :rolleyes:

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"These interest rate rises are very insensitive, most people struggle to cope anyway bearing in mind the cost of living compared to the average salary. Christmas is 7 weeks away, this is now an extra burden for most people trying to enjoy this time of year. There are the obvious economical reason why this is done, but no-one seems to think average the average Joe that this affects. Thanks very much!!!!

Laura, Reading"

:lol::lol::lol:

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I truly think we are heading for a breakdown in our society, i could feel the stress and pain in some of those comments.

Two things have come across from the comments on the BBC site about interest rates and house prices, and that is that there is aqute pain and anger on both sides. People with large amounts of mortgage debt are angry about rates rising, while people who are priced out of the market are angry about house prices rising. Certainly my own emotions about this issue are very stong... feelings of despair, anger, helplessness, a sense that my life is passing me by and I'm not spending it the way I want because my wage doesn't match up to the unavoidable expenses that I have to face every month. For me it isn't so much that house prices are too high as wages are too low. You only have to look at energy bill inflation, water rate inflation and council tax inflation to see that house prices aren't alone in being ridiculous. The whole thing generates a stong sense of being cheated – The government is happy to let the cost of life's essentials spiral out of control while under-representing them in its inflation reckonings so that wages can be kept surpressed. Many times over the last couple of years have I sat at my desk at work seething at having to sell my time for a price that doesn't afford a quality of life outside work that is adequate compensation for that sacrifice. One day I was sat with my teeth clenched so hard that I chipped one of them and had to go to the dentist to have the sharp edge that was left smoothed-off. It was then that I realised I needed to chill out and take a step back, so I can now discuss it rationally without getting worked up. It's a truly miserable situation though... a government that is supposed to be about people is making it prohibitively hard for ordinary working folk just have an ordinary life, and there's nothing we can do about it because we're all so much in debt that we can't walk out on strike, at least most can't – Obviously many HPCers such as myself are savers rather than borrowers and probably could, but it would take everyone, not just a handful of us, to get a result. Seems the government have got us just where it wants us... Using debt to control so many of us that the few without any debt don't have enough clout to make a difference. I can feel sentiment changing around me... an unspoken but very detectable sense of utter resignation as this surveillance/police/tax/debt state extinguishes the spark of everyone and everything in it.

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Like most things - only people that are angry complain. Not very representative.

The amount of people currently adversely affected by the current boom is still relatively small (includes me by the way). Anyone that bought 4 years+ ago are probably fine as are the people that haven't bought. It is interesting how people (very financially astute people) haven't really worked out what the average FTB'r mortgage costs they are so used to their £200-£300 mortgages.

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You haven't seen any real anger yet.

Wait till the large number of poeple whose future has effectively been blighted by what has already happened one by one (or hundreds ata a time) lose their jobs, not just during this so called boom but year upon year based on recent profligate debt creation and spending that has inflated costs in the even further away from global levels. New business formation will be clobbered - indebted students with large outgoings will not be starting anything like the number of businesses their forebears did.

The press release today form the car credit provider shows what is to come - even in that "industry" they realise that they are slitting their own throats with the way they are running their businesses at the moment. Its all a matter of time.

Edited by OnlyMe

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I don't trust comments on the BBC website as they are only posted by a tiny fraction of society and there would probably be just as much anguish if the governent put 1p on the cost of a packet of fags.

I personally think the BBC are subject to some pressure from the British government but a much more pervasive effect is that of their own unconscious institutional left-wing bias. The BBC seem to filter according to their own parameters of what they consider to be 'a balance of opinions'. Lately though, I think that they are being forced to publish a greater number of negative opinions due to the sheer number of them. At the end of the day the BBC are a corporation without principles and will change their views like the direction of the wind.

Two things have come across from the comments on the BBC site about interest rates and house prices, and that is that there is aqute pain and anger on both sides. People with large amounts of mortgage debt are angry about rates rising, while people who are priced out of the market are angry about house prices rising. Certainly my own emotions about this issue are very stong... feelings of despair, anger, helplessness, a sense that my life is passing me by and I'm not spending it the way I want because my wage doesn't match up to the unavoidable expenses that I have to face every month. For me it isn't so much that house prices are too high as wages are too low. You only have to look at energy bill inflation, water rate inflation and council tax inflation to see that house prices aren't alone in being ridiculous. The whole thing generates a stong sense of being cheated – The government is happy to let the cost of life's essentials spiral out of control while under-representing them in its inflation reckonings so that wages can be kept surpressed. Many times over the last couple of years have I sat at my desk at work seething at having to sell my time for a price that doesn't afford a quality of life outside work that is adequate compensation for that sacrifice. One day I was sat with my teeth clenched so hard that I chipped one of them and had to go to the dentist to have the sharp edge that was left smoothed-off. It was then that I realised I needed to chill out and take a step back, so I can now discuss it rationally without getting worked up. It's a truly miserable situation though... a government that is supposed to be about people is making it prohibitively hard for ordinary working folk just have an ordinary life, and there's nothing we can do about it because we're all so much in debt that we can't walk out on strike, at least most can't – Obviously many HPCers such as myself are savers rather than borrowers and probably could, but it would take everyone, not just a handful of us, to get a result. Seems the government have got us just where it wants us... Using debt to control so many of us that the few without any debt don't have enough clout to make a difference. I can feel sentiment changing around me... an unspoken but very detectable sense of utter resignation as this surveillance/police/tax/debt state extinguishes the spark of everyone and everything in it.

I noticed this to. There are people who don't like the idea of losing their profit. There are idiots. And there are people who cannot avoid debt. Then there are the savers for whom this is good news. So there is a whole mixed bag from right across the spectrum. And as Sam says there are unavoidable tensions developing due to competing interests. This is actually the main reason why I oppose massive immigration. This is the 'rats in a cage' aggression that will become an increasing feature of British society.

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There are people who don't like the idea of losing their profit.

And this really really really irritates me.

There is no profit until AFTER you have completed a sale. Ask anyone who runs a business.

Also, the reason I oppose mass immigration is that if (when!) this country falls into property-led recession, the last thing you want to have done is to have just imported 500,000 romanians/latvians/kasahkstanis etc... (Except Borat and his sister)

Edited by megaflop

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Two things have come across from the comments on the BBC site about interest rates and house prices, and that is that there is aqute pain and anger on both sides. People with large amounts of mortgage debt are angry about rates rising, while people who are priced out of the market are angry about house prices rising. Certainly my own emotions about this issue are very stong... feelings of despair, anger, helplessness, a sense that my life is passing me by and I'm not spending it the way I want because my wage doesn't match up to the unavoidable expenses that I have to face every month. For me it isn't so much that house prices are too high as wages are too low. You only have to look at energy bill inflation, water rate inflation and council tax inflation to see that house prices aren't alone in being ridiculous. The whole thing generates a stong sense of being cheated – The government is happy to let the cost of life's essentials spiral out of control while under-representing them in its inflation reckonings so that wages can be kept surpressed. Many times over the last couple of years have I sat at my desk at work seething at having to sell my time for a price that doesn't afford a quality of life outside work that is adequate compensation for that sacrifice. One day I was sat with my teeth clenched so hard that I chipped one of them and had to go to the dentist to have the sharp edge that was left smoothed-off. It was then that I realised I needed to chill out and take a step back, so I can now discuss it rationally without getting worked up. It's a truly miserable situation though... a government that is supposed to be about people is making it prohibitively hard for ordinary working folk just have an ordinary life, and there's nothing we can do about it because we're all so much in debt that we can't walk out on strike, at least most can't – Obviously many HPCers such as myself are savers rather than borrowers and probably could, but it would take everyone, not just a handful of us, to get a result. Seems the government have got us just where it wants us... Using debt to control so many of us that the few without any debt don't have enough clout to make a difference. I can feel sentiment changing around me... an unspoken but very detectable sense of utter resignation as this surveillance/police/tax/debt state extinguishes the spark of everyone and everything in it.

It's a generational thing though, most people over 45 have no real idea how much financial pressure is on the young. The only experience of it they have is their kids moaning about not being able to afford a house to which they reply "it was hard for us too".

The government are systematically impoverishing a generation, but hey, they don't vote anyway so who cares?

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  • 315 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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