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when the correction comes. Saw this last night and can't believe what these tossers get up to. The bit where the bailiff terrified those two littel girls was HEARTBREAKING.

Considering just how limited their powers are, it's amazing there are so many of them out there making damn good money.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp

What amazed me was the woman who refused to accept the bailiffs claim they could seize any property in the house to clear another family member`s debt. She rang her solicitor and during the conversation she said "so that`s rubbish" and handed the phone to the bailiff. He told her solicitor that the courts had changed the rules which was a complete and utter lie and she paid up. She then complained to the bailiff`s company and surprise, surprise they repaid her the money.

I have known for years they can`t seize any property that does not belong to the debtor and the incident with the little girls should be the subject of a criminal prosecution.

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when the correction comes. Saw this last night and can't believe what these tossers get up to. The bit where the bailiff terrified those two littel girls was HEARTBREAKING.

Considering just how limited their powers are, it's amazing there are so many of them out there making damn good money.

Read this thread

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/ind...showtopic=35884

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Bailiffs powers are a lot more restricted than people believe. If you don't open the door, they CANNOT enter and even though they are allowed to climb in through an open window, they rarely do cos there've been instances where the occupant has mistaken them for a burglar and set to work with the obligatory baseball bat. They're not allowed to force entry unless they've actually been allowed in on a previous occasion and made an arrangement to secure payment from a debtor in which case they're allowed to break your door down.

They can't break into a locked garage unless they're collecting tax debts ie council tax, orders for pament of income tax.

Bloke I know paid £20 and got all his valuables made the subject of a "loan" from a credit company. By all accounts he found 'em on eBay, paid the £20 and, after he'd sent them a list of all the stuff he didn't want repossessed, they sent him a bogus loan agreement effectively saying his £3000 tv, DVD surround sound system and his Subaru Impreza were financed by a loan from them and until such time as the loan was settled, the goods remained their property. Bailiffs turned up a few times but couldn't take a thing . . . .

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when the correction comes. Saw this last night and can't believe what these tossers get up to. The bit where the bailiff terrified those two littel girls was HEARTBREAKING.

Considering just how limited their powers are, it's amazing there are so many of them out there making damn good money.

There are "people" on this site that are wishing for a major crash so that this thing becomes more common!! "People" waiting for repos to rocket, "People" waiting for other people to become bankrupt or homeless.

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There are "people" on this site that are wishing for a major crash so that this thing becomes more common!! "People" waiting for repos to rocket, "People" waiting for other people to become bankrupt or homeless.

Yeah, it's pretty sickening. Thing is many of them aren't pissed off because they can't buy a house per se . . . they're pissed off because they've missed out on what has been the biggest HPI ever and - as they're forever telling us - the "illusory" wealth it's created.

I clearly recall that when property prices were severely depressed back in 1994/95, you could have heard a pin drop in any estate agency anywhere in the country. Now I'm assuming that FTBs then were pretty much the same bunch of ordinary folk that FTBs are now some 12 years later. I don't remember an underclass bitching about how they couldn't get on the ladder. There wasn't this all-consuming belief that we had a God-given RIGHT to buy a property but now that anyone who's bought property in the last 5-10 years has effectively made a killing, consciously or otherwise, these "people" are clamouring for them to be repossessed, bankrupted or made destitute.

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Won't a fake letter actually allow that company to take the lot should they decide to?

Sounds like a great business idea preying on the greedy and stupid.

That's what I thought but undoubtedly, he would ensure he had the genuine receipts for the goods kept safely somewhere should true ownership ever be disputed.

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I clearly recall that when property prices were severely depressed back in 1994/95, you could have heard a pin drop in any estate agency anywhere in the country. Now I'm assuming that FTBs then were pretty much the same bunch of ordinary folk that FTBs are now some 12 years later. I don't remember an underclass bitching about how they couldn't get on the ladder.

Maybe, just maybe, the absence of bitching from FTB's around 1995 was because at that time they could get on the ladder.

I seem to recall that the 'bitching' in 1995 was coming from those who had purchased in 1989 and were still underwater.

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There wasn't this all-consuming belief that we had a God-given RIGHT to buy a property but now that anyone who's bought property in the last 5-10 years has effectively made a killing, consciously or otherwise, these "people" are clamouring for them to be repossessed, bankrupted or made destitute.

I don't think that's what the majority of people here want. They would just like to see prices normalise so they can afford to buy a starter home/flat.

If a crash does occur I cannot feel sympathy for people who do get repossessed, bankrupted or made destitute because they overstretched themselves. People make a decision and they have to face the consequences of said decision.

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I don't think that's what the majority of people here want. They would just like to see prices normalise so they can afford to buy a starter home/flat.

But that's what I meant about '94/95. 3 x income could've got FTBs a perfectly decent 1 or 2 bed flat in an up and coming part of London quite easily. Hell, that was THE bottom of the market. I reckon that if there was a crash and prices hit rockbottom in a year or two, half the bleaters on this forum won't be seen for dust . . . we'll be hearing that pin be dropping in brokers' offices again.

I know a lot of people around here who lamented on the notion that a mortgage was just a millstone for your neck and how they knew Fred down the road who got repossessed cos he was "only" 7 months in arrears on his mortgage. They failed to recognise Fred's mortgage was only £75K for chrissakes. Those same whingers are bitching now cos prices have run away from them.

Face it . . . that bitter taste of bile in the mouths of the bleeding hearts on this forum who were old enough and earning enough to buy something back then isn't caused by the inability of these poor darlings to buy their first cozy home they can call their own . . . it's caused by the fact that they feel they've missed out on what - with the benefit of that wonderful lens, hindsight - has been the easiest get-rich scheme to befall the man in the street for DECADES !

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when the correction comes. Saw this last night and can't believe what these tossers get up to. The bit where the bailiff terrified those two littel girls was HEARTBREAKING.

Considering just how limited their powers are, it's amazing there are so many of them out there making damn good money.

http://www.fool.co.uk/school/2006/sch06100...m?ref=foolwatch

We're probably all familiar with the line "Your home may be at risk if you do not keep up with the repayments"

which applies to debts secured against your home. A mortgage is just one example of a secured debt -- it

prevents you from selling your home without paying back what is owed and the lender can force the sale of

your property if you fall behind with repayments. It's why The Motley Fool favours unsecured loans because

then you're not risking losing the roof over your head.

However, there is one way that a creditor can turn an unsecured loan into a secured one and it's by using a

Charging Order. Be warned that creditors are increasingly using these as a means of getting their money back

if you default on a loan!

It works like this: Once a creditor has secured a County Court Judgment against you, they can apply for a

Charging Order as a means of enforcing the debt. At the moment creditors are not allowed to ask for a

Charging Order if you have already agreed with the court to repay the debt by instalments and you are not in arrears,

but the law is expected to change soon, enabling creditors to obtain an order even if you haven't fallen behind with your payments.

It's starting :ph34r:

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Yeah this is gonna be hell for a lot of people. Having said that, the unsecured lender can't force the debtor to sell the property as the unsecured finance is usually for far smaller amounts than a mortage in 2006 and most judges won't grant a possession order. As long as the debtor's paying his 1st mortgagee, the unsecured lender could theoretically end up waiting 15 years or more for their money if the debtor doesn't sell up.

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