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Atari In Trouble

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http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/5333826.stm

Could a struggling gaming industry be signalling tough times haed for the economy.

The gaming industry in the UK (at least) has been in trouble for years. It was a classic bubble really - I know a few people that work/worked in the industry, and it was all very lucrative, especially across the turn of the millenium. Then, from 2002 (related to the tech crash?) places started to shed people - it has never really recovered, although it seems to have stabilised along the bottom now.

People who weren't necessarily that talented were doing very well in 2000-2, and most of them were pretty young too. Therefore, not understanding about the cyclical nature of things, they came to believe that their wage would continuously spiral upward and that they could safely rack up large debts accordingly. The comedown from this was quite painful.

Reminiscent of anything?

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The gaming industry in the UK (at least) has been in trouble for years. It was a classic bubble really - I know a few people that work/worked in the industry, and it was all very lucrative, especially across the turn of the millenium. Then, from 2002 (related to the tech crash?) places started to shed people - it has never really recovered, although it seems to have stabilised along the bottom now.

People who weren't necessarily that talented were doing very well in 2000-2, and most of them were pretty young too. Therefore, not understanding about the cyclical nature of things, they came to believe that their wage would continuously spiral upward and that they could safely rack up large debts accordingly. The comedown from this was quite painful.

Reminiscent of anything?

Quite. ;)

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I spent a couple of hours once trying to get to a million on Missile Command on my VCS until my mum called me down for tea. We didn't have pause buttons when I were a lad.

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I spent a couple of hours once trying to get to a million on Missile Command on my VCS until my mum called me down for tea. We didn't have pause buttons when I were a lad.

I had the same thing on my old TRS-80 when I was a lad – no pause buttons – I can not remember the games name but it was the first game to use a grey shade in a computer game – it was a major advance – as computers were only black and white – so grey was achieved by flashing the pixels on and off very quickly – gone are the days of the big five software empire - long live microsoft

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I didn't realise Atari still existed... I thought they went bust in the 90s.

I think somebody later bought the name. I remember the revival of Atari being publicised only a few years ago.

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A lot of the high st. shops sellign games are ha

ving a hard time as well

You can download a lot of the old atari arcade classics for free here

http://www.ezone.com/partners/real/games/a...ehits/index.htm

http://internetgames.about.com/gi/dynamic/...ames%2Fhome.jsp

Many Midway arcade classics like Defender, Spyhunter (needs shockwave)

http://www.midway.com/page/ClassicGames.html

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/5333826.stm

Could a struggling gaming industry be signalling tough times haed for the economy.

Ireland = second largest per capita consumer of games consoles. Struggling economy, traditionally high unemployment, dependent on a few foreign investors. Nothing else to do in a place with so few prospects but play games (or start a world-class rock band that transcends all pop genres for about 3 decades...)

Nah, I don't think a downturn will effect console sales. I think they're a cheaper alternative to many other passtimes people choose to fritter away the hours.

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Computer history.

I had the same thing on my old TRS-80 when I was a lad – no pause buttons – I can not remember the games name but it was the first game to use a grey shade in a computer game – it was a major advance – as computers were only black and whitee – so grey was achieved by flashing the pixels on and off very quickly... [look to the past]

When the TRS-80 Model 1 became available, the Apple II -- the first colour computer -- had already been on the market for several weeks.

'TRS-80':

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-80

Announced at a press conference in August 3, 1977, the Tandy TRS-80 Model I was Tandy's entry into the home computer market, meant to compete head on against the Commodore PET 2001 and the Apple II.

'Apple II series':

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_II_series

The Apple II had color and high-resolution graphics modes, sound capabilities and a built-in BASIC programming language. Compared with earlier microcomputers, these features were well documented and easy to learn. The Apple II sparked the beginning of the personal computer revolution, as it was targeted for the masses rather than just hobbyists and engineers; its introduction and subsequent popularity also greatly influenced most of the microcomputers that followed it.

[...snip...]

The first Apple II computers went on sale on June 5, 1977....

Atari history.

'Atari':

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atari

Atari is a corporate and brand name owned by several entities over the time period from 1972 to present. It is currently held by Atari, Inc. (NASDAQ: ATAR), a majority owned subsidiary of Infogrames Entertainment SA (IESA), encompassing its North American operations. Atari develops, publishes and distributes games for all major video game consoles, as well as for the personal computer, and is currently one of the largest third-party publishers of video games in the United States.

The company that currently bears the Atari name was founded in 1993 under the name GT Interactive. GT Interactive was acquired by IESA in 1999 and renamed Infogrames, Inc. Infogrames acquired the Atari brand name from its purchase of Hasbro Interactive, which in turn had acquired it from JTS Corporation, which the original Atari had merged with in 1996. Infogrames, Inc. intermittently used the Atari name as a brand name for selected titles before IESA officially changed the U.S. subsidiary's name to Atari, Inc. in 2003.

The original Atari was founded in 1972 by Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney. It was a pioneer in arcade games, home video game consoles, and home computers. The company's products, such as PONG and the Atari 2600, helped define computer entertainment industry from the 1970s to the mid-1980s.

Atari Games was split off in 1984 with the rights to use the brand on arcade games, such as Klax, Gauntlet and Roadblasters. This separate company became part of Midway Games, which pulled out of the coin-op market and no longer uses the Atari name. It had no connection to IESA.

Edited by Jeff Ross

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The gaming industry in the UK (at least) has been in trouble for years. It was a classic bubble really - I know a few people that work/worked in the industry, and it was all very lucrative, especially across the turn of the millenium. Then, from 2002 (related to the tech crash?) places started to shed people - it has never really recovered, although it seems to have stabilised along the bottom now.

People who weren't necessarily that talented were doing very well in 2000-2, and most of them were pretty young too. Therefore, not understanding about the cyclical nature of things, they came to believe that their wage would continuously spiral upward and that they could safely rack up large debts accordingly. The comedown from this was quite painful.

Reminiscent of anything?

Utter rubbish.

The UK games industry has restructured itself but at the moment it is unbelievably strong. In fact the problem we are having at the moment more than anything is finding people, there is a huge global shortfall in skilled games programmers, designers and artists.

Some of the smaller independent studios have closed but the larger studios and publishers have more than doubled in size.

Fancypants could you tell me where you get your information from with regards people who weren't that talented doing well in 2000-2002 and then some kind of ensuing crash that even though I work in the industry never witnessed. I have worked across the industry with Rockstar, EA, Codemasters and Climax and simply dont recognise anything you are saying as ever happening.

In fact and this is quite poignant given the date but the Games Industry was one of the few industries that actually rose after 9/11. I would say that an upward trend in the games Industry is more likely to point to recession than a downward trend.

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Nah, I don't think a downturn will effect console sales. I think they're a cheaper alternative to many other passtimes people choose to fritter away the hours.

True, but you may see a lot more people buying games second-hand (or, as I do, waiting until they hit the bargain bins).

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True, but you may see a lot more people buying games second-hand (or, as I do, waiting until they hit the bargain bins).

The retail side of games is a different issue entirely. The internet has changed that market completely. An increased price point for next gen games has helped increase margins but there is just too much comeptition in the market.

The upside for games is that we are finding the target audience is growing year on year. Were as before the main age range of gamers was 11-18 we are now finding the most active age range is 22-30 and a large group of over 35's also buy games regularly. This will grow as the 80's gaming generation gets older and older. Look out as well for PS3 launch. The games look fantastic and a new wave will put even more pressure on games companies to get developing.

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The retail side of games is a different issue entirely.

I'm not sure what you mean. If most people chose not to pay full price for a game in a recession, that would be a huge hit for game publishers.

Heck, the last time I pre-ordered a game it was already discounted 50% from the official price, and it was a big-name game that had decent sales, not something being dumped on the market.

The upside for games is that we are finding the target audience is growing year on year.

Possibly, but as I get older I'm finding that I care less and less about games because there's little in most of them that I haven't seen a hundred times before.

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best game I ever remember was Rockman and Rockman II on the Commodore 16 - never played

a game as good. Sad I know, and irrelevant to Atari ;)

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I'm not sure what you mean. If most people chose not to pay full price for a game in a recession, that would be a huge hit for game publishers.

Heck, the last time I pre-ordered a game it was already discounted 50% from the official price, and it was a big-name game that had decent sales, not something being dumped on the market.

Possibly, but as I get older I'm finding that I care less and less about games because there's little in most of them that I haven't seen a hundred times before.

What I meant was the retail business side of things in other words the high street retailers themselves going out of business because as you rightly say some retailers online are offering discounts on pre-orders. This has no effect on the price the game is sold to the retailer for but has increased the competition amongst retailers.

It's surprising how many gamers are loyal to a certain game series and for instance with Championship Manager/Football Manager most people are queueing at shops or pre ordering to get their hands on the game on release date. Add to this the pressure kids put on parents etc to buy them the latest game (peer pressure unfortunately drives this in many cases). I recently spoke to a guy at the local game store in town and he said that the majority of full price purchasers were in his opinion Doley Chavs. These guys are the ones with time on their hands to play games all day and it is in fact a great way for them to escape the sad reality of their lives.

A similar argument was put forth after the 9/11 surge, many people turned to games to escape reality for a few hours. I would imagine a recession would bring the same response.

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I spent a couple of hours once trying to get to a million on Missile Command on my VCS until my mum called me down for tea. We didn't have pause buttons when I were a lad.

You were lucky!!!

We didn't have Missile Command on A VCS, we used to have to draw it on piece of paper and pretend to play it.

And it was only a black & white drawing too!!

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  • 341 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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