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Have You Noticed More Shops & Pubs Closing Recently?

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Here in Chester, I walk through the town centre at least once or twice a day, and have been keeping an eye on the amount of dead shops.

In the last 3 months, I've seen a definate increase in the amount of shops closing, particularly in the last month. There are now some big gaping holes in what was the 11th biggest shopping city in England.

I was particularly suprised to see a 'peaceful re-entry' (repo'd by landlord) sign in a clothes shop chain in the main high st.the other day. Ok, perhaps the rents are going up, but big chain shops are going down, such as Costa coffee.

This must be a big economic indicator, has anyone else noticed an increase in their area ? .

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Here in Chester, I walk through the town centre at least once or twice a day, and have been keeping an eye on the amount of dead shops.

In the last 3 months, I've seen a definate increase in the amount of shops closing, particularly in the last month. There are now some big gaping holes in what was the 11th biggest shopping city in England.

I was particularly suprised to see a 'peaceful re-entry' (repo'd by landlord) sign in a clothes shop chain in the main high st.the other day. Ok, perhaps the rents are going up, but big chain shops are going down, such as Costa coffee.

This must be a big economic indicator, has anyone else noticed an increase in their area ? .

Welcome to the party old chap, I've been saying we're in a consumer recession for months. The problem for all these retailers is that they're rapidly increasing floorspace, with sales either static or falling - a recipe for disaster.

I've noticed quite a few 'back street boozers' going but I know nought about the pub trade.

Don't agree with you about Costa coffe. They and the other chains are doing very well and IMHO will weather the recession well. £2 for a coffee is in many people's mindsets now, I think they're loonies to pay it but I recognise that millions of people have bought into it.The profit margins are tasty for the firms too.

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Pubs i've seen closed are being torn down and turned into flats. Shops that are closing are the ones that just can't compete with the likes of Primark who have lower overheads, and provide 'value'.

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YES!! Here in Malvern, Worcestershire they're closing down like it's going out of fashion! In Malvern Link which is basically one street, there are TWELVE recently deceased shops. Than's quite a lot and it's actually noticable as you drive through. The place has a moribund feel to it.

In Great Malvern mostly the shops are end-of-lease charity shops. It's going down. Even the big posh girls' schools have had to amalgamate 'cos of reduced numbers of pupils.

Jeez Malvern is a funny place - all fur coat and no knickers. Chavs and OAPs.

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Here in Chester, I walk through the town centre at least once or twice a day, and have been keeping an eye on the amount of dead shops.

In the last 3 months, I've seen a definate increase in the amount of shops closing, particularly in the last month. There are now some big gaping holes in what was the 11th biggest shopping city in England.

I was particularly suprised to see a 'peaceful re-entry' (repo'd by landlord) sign in a clothes shop chain in the main high st.the other day. Ok, perhaps the rents are going up, but big chain shops are going down, such as Costa coffee.

This must be a big economic indicator, has anyone else noticed an increase in their area ? .

Blimey Chester my old town.Last time I was up there it seemed to be doing well.Just out of interest what was the clothes shop that was repossed?I take it you mean the street where the Eastgate clock is.

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Used to live in Chester too. Fraid it wasn't my kind of place. Being a frugal scruff I never got into the whole shopping in your best clothes for more best clothes thing that it seemed to have going. Seemed pretty cliquey too. Always went out in Liverpool instead.

Plenty of shops closing around here (east London) too and I was really struck the other day by the number of long established online Macintosh businesses which had recently gone to the wall.

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Welcome to the party old chap, I've been saying we're in a consumer recession for months. The problem for all these retailers is that they're rapidly increasing floorspace, with sales either static or falling - a recipe for disaster.

I've noticed quite a few 'back street boozers' going but I know nought about the pub trade.

Don't agree with you about Costa coffe. They and the other chains are doing very well and IMHO will weather the recession well. £2 for a coffee is in many people's mindsets now, I think they're loonies to pay it but I recognise that millions of people have bought into it.The profit margins are tasty for the firms too.

Perhaps, it was a freak about Costa, Don't think they relocated in Chester though, Star bucks is still busy. Several EA's have relocated to smaller premises or downsized from 2 shops to 1.

Blimey Chester my old town.Last time I was up there it seemed to be doing well.Just out of interest what was the clothes shop that was repossed?I take it you mean the street where the Eastgate clock is.

I think the shop was called 'Pilot'. I mention the repo notice as its unusual to see one, as it means a forced repo of the shop & lease forfeit, not a simple closing down / end of lease.

Costa was by the Cathedral. The centre pub I saw was just boarded up not going for housing like many I saw in South London 3-5 yrs ago.

What interests me is that most shops usually go under/close down in Jan-May when the bank / creditors see they had a bad xmas & trade is poor as this worst time of year. But this year the rate of shops closing has continued into the summer.

Used to live in Chester too. Fraid it wasn't my kind of place. Being a frugal scruff I never got into the whole shopping in your best clothes for more best clothes thing that it seemed to have going. Seemed pretty cliquey too. Always went out in Liverpool instead.

Plenty of shops closing around here (east London) too and I was really struck the other day by the number of long established online Macintosh businesses which had recently gone to the wall.

Having been here 2.5 years, I would agree that its cliquey and lacking in the arts / left field culture. Being rather anti-consumerist, ie. supporting charity shops & the car booty, I don't go for the whole shopping thing either , I just document its demise ;)

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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Pub closures destroying our heritage.

Pubs i've seen closed are being torn down and turned into flats. [aris]

Yes, many pubs are closing and either being converted into private houses or flats, or demolished to make way for a new build (an attached car park can make the site far more valuable than just the building). This is a consequence of the housing bubble that's rarely discussed in these forums: it's destroying our heritage. Many rural pubs and shops can not generate the profit required to provide a return on the inflated capital value of the premises, hence the business is closed and the building sold for residential use.

I'm all for more of the "trendy bars" closing. Bring back the British Pub! [Jimothy]

Absolutely. Trendy bars can be reopened at any time. Once a traditional pub has gone that's part of our heritage gone for good.

An all too rare example of a pub saved from extinction is the Swan Inn at Kettleshulme:

http://www.the-swan-inn-kettleshulme.co.uk/

Note: Beer festival this weekend!

'Drinkers buy their own pub':

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/new...ir_own_pub.html

A village is toasting victory today after snatching their local pub from closure -- with a £425,000 kitty.

Regulars of the Swan Inn at Kettleshulme, near Macclesfield, formed a consortium to buy the pub after the landlord for four years, Ian Edmonds, decided to turn it into a house.

Their first approach to buy the 15th century coaching inn was rejected by Mr Edmonds because he planned to keep it as a family home.

Edited to add title.

Edited by Jeff Ross

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YES!! Here in Malvern, Worcestershire they're closing down like it's going out of fashion! In Malvern Link which is basically one street, there are TWELVE recently deceased shops. Than's quite a lot and it's actually noticable as you drive through. The place has a moribund feel to it.

In Great Malvern mostly the shops are end-of-lease charity shops. It's going down. Even the big posh girls' schools have had to amalgamate 'cos of reduced numbers of pupils.

Jeez Malvern is a funny place - all fur coat and no knickers. Chavs and OAPs.

'Jeez Malvern is a funny place - all fur coat and no knickers. Chavs and OAPs'

:D

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Thanks Saving For a Space Ship.Funny enough I have never seen a repo on a shop window until about 4 weeks ago when I saw one in a Computer shop in Welwyn Garden City.

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Macintosh sales

...I was really struck the other day by the number of long established online Macintosh businesses which had recently gone to the wall. [greencat]

That's because their cheese has been moved by Apple's own online Store and expanding chain of retail stores (which will price match). Macintosh sales in the UK continue to grow strongly...

'Mac Sales Strong in The UK and Western Europe' [June 2006]:

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Mac-Sales-S...ope-26301.shtml

Both in the UK and in Western Europe, the growth of Apple shipments has outperformed the rest of the PC industry for both portables and desktops in the first quarter. Apple's overall first quarter market share was 2.9, across all models; specifically, in the portable market it had 3.4 percent, and in the desktop one it secured 2.65 percent.

While the numbers don't look like much, the 3.4 percent market share for portables is a 50.15 percent year-on-year improvement for the company, a far cry from the industry average, which was 20.44 percent in the same period. Similarly, the desktop sales saw a 27.38 percent, year on year growth.

Edited to add date.

Edited by Jeff Ross

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