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drhewitt

The New Victorian Era

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With all the conflicting news coming from this forum and the media, it looks like the great divide of the Victorian Era is back.

Those who can afford a house and those who can't.

I do think there will be a crash soon, but I think America will cause this, rather than England itself.

I have been tracing my family history, and it's amazing just how few people actually owned the house they lived in - the majority of people had low wage unskilled jobs. Some were living off Parish funds.

Is today any different? With degrees costing 3,000 pounds, a housing ladder with the first rung at a wage of 50,000 a year and too many unskilled jobs, it looks like the 1800s are about to repeat themselves.

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repeated in other posts, but very fitting for this topic...

www.thisislondon.co.uk

The principle of free movement within the EU means we are rapidly Europeanising the needy and dependent.

Not just the poor but that part of the poor who cannot be absorbed into the workforce. Those for whom the only way out is the handout line and the doorway. And, after that, the social security office and the council house waiting list.

London's Victoria Coach Station is the doorway that offers the cheapest means of getting to the capital. For the past few years, it has been overwhelmed with Poles - many of whom are hardworking, highly trained and motivated to succeed, their presence largely applauded.

But many others come with no money, no contacts, no English and no prospects. They arrive desperate. Within a matter of hours their desperation increases as they bed down in and around the coach station.

There they begin the process of becoming refugees in a town of plenty. Surrounded by some of the most expensive property in London, they have no real option other than to become homeless and thereby begin the decline into total dependency.

Perhaps the only thing that is different is that there are no debtors's prisons. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Edited by drhewitt

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With all the conflicting news coming from this forum and the media, it looks like the great divide of the Victorian Era is back.

Those who can afford a house and those who can't.

I do think there will be a crash soon, but I think America will cause this, rather than England itself.

I have been tracing my family history, and it's amazing just how few people actually owned the house they lived in - the majority of people had low wage unskilled jobs. Some were living off Parish funds.

Is today any different? With degrees costing 3,000 pounds, a housing ladder with the first rung at a wage of 50,000 a year and too many unskilled jobs, it looks like the 1800s are about to repeat themselves.

Yes I agree, a labour government has actually actively made the poorest even poorer. They have kept wage inflation down for the poorest by importing labour despite warnings from Germany and Sweden. House prices now mean that you really need a combined income of around 40,000 to buy the cheapest house. You need to be from a middle class home to go to UNI.

repeated in other posts, but very fitting for this topic...

www.thisislondon.co.uk

The principle of free movement within the EU means we are rapidly Europeanising the needy and dependent.

Not just the poor but that part of the poor who cannot be absorbed into the workforce. Those for whom the only way out is the handout line and the doorway. And, after that, the social security office and the council house waiting list.

London's Victoria Coach Station is the doorway that offers the cheapest means of getting to the capital. For the past few years, it has been overwhelmed with Poles - many of whom are hardworking, highly trained and motivated to succeed, their presence largely applauded.

But many others come with no money, no contacts, no English and no prospects. They arrive desperate. Within a matter of hours their desperation increases as they bed down in and around the coach station.

There they begin the process of becoming refugees in a town of plenty. Surrounded by some of the most expensive property in London, they have no real option other than to become homeless and thereby begin the decline into total dependency.

Perhaps the only thing that is different is that there are no debtors's prisons. Correct me if I'm wrong.

If there were debtors prisons....they would be very overcrowded

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You need to be from a middle class home to go to UNI.

Tuition fees were the policy that destroyed the last remnants of any connection with socialism or social justice that New Labour could lay claim to. That policy alone will negatively affect the competitiveness of British industry for decades to come. But I'm forgetting, there will be no industry to speak of, just buying and selling property from each other at ever increasing prices will keep the economy going :lol:

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indeed.

the next stage is burning books so people don't have the ability to educate themselves.

...easily done if you relieve people of the need for books by going online...and then censoring everything the web has to offer....maybe it's about time to invest in literature!!!

just make sure you have a route out of the country for your goods!!(funny how we are now having debates on radio 2 about the potential demise of the newspaper!!!!!!!)

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indeed.

the next stage is burning books so people don't have the ability to educate themselves.

...easily done if you relieve people of the need for books by going online...and then censoring everything the web has to offer....maybe it's about time to invest in literature!!!

just make sure you have a route out of the country for your goods!!(funny how we are now having debates on radio 2 about the potential demise of the newspaper!!!!!!!)

Slightly off topic here but my wife and I were talking about the transfer of knowledge from books to electronic media at the weekend. Apart from the visual and tactile pleasure (oooh err missus) that you gain from a book, books act as a highly useful redundant 'backup' for knowledge. A catastrophic event may destroy all the libraries in England, but with no extra equiment required, the same information is available and easily accessible elsewhere. Should we become too reliant upon a single source (wikipedia anyone?) or a single access method you may end up with problems down the line.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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