Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Realistbear

Unemployment Rate Rises Among Recent Graduates

Recommended Posts

http://money.guardian.co.uk/work/story/0,,1844427,00.html

Unemployment rate rises among recent graduates

Press Association
Monday August 14, 2006
EducationGuardian.co.uk
The number of graduates who failed to find work after leaving university rose last year, according to figures released today.
Graduates with degrees in computer science had the highest unemployment rate, with nearly 11% thought to be not working or studying.

As the Miracle Economy offshores more IT jobs its little wonder. Jobs are going East where houses are less and labour costs lower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://money.guardian.co.uk/work/story/0,,1844427,00.html

Unemployment rate rises among recent graduates

Press Association
Monday August 14, 2006
EducationGuardian.co.uk
The number of graduates who failed to find work after leaving university rose last year, according to figures released today.
Graduates with degrees in computer science had the highest unemployment rate, with nearly 11% thought to be not working or studying.

As the Miracle Economy offshores more IT jobs its little wonder. Jobs are going East where houses are less and labour costs lower.

nothing to do with the fact the most IT graduates do not have the necessary skills then?

Where I work we have been looking to take on graduates in IT and the standard has been terrible

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://money.guardian.co.uk/work/story/0,,1844427,00.html

Unemployment rate rises among recent graduates

Press Association
Monday August 14, 2006
EducationGuardian.co.uk
The number of graduates who failed to find work after leaving university rose last year, according to figures released today.
Graduates with degrees in computer science had the highest unemployment rate, with nearly 11% thought to be not working or studying.

As the Miracle Economy offshores more IT jobs its little wonder. Jobs are going East where houses are less and labour costs lower.

If you were dull enough to choose to study a computer science degree then you probably are dull enough to enjoy working in IT.

For all others out there - IT is the most dull working environment, working in IT for a long period should carry a warning - it turns people into boring clones. I would not recommend it to anyone. If you can't get a job in IT you have been saved a life of misery.

Edited by munimula

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nothing to do with the fact the most IT graduates do not have the necessary skills then?

Where I work we have been looking to take on graduates in IT and the standard has been terrible

Same here, with power engineering graduates.

Also I think with IT it's a regional thing, with most jobs being centred in London and the SE. IT jobs are still plentiful there, so it may be that IT grads who don't want to/can't relocate make up the majority of the 11%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you were dull enough to choose to study a computer science degree then you probably are dull enough to enjoy working in IT.

For all others out there - IT is the most dull working environment, working in IT for a long period should carry a warning - it turns people into boring clones. I would not recommend it to anyone. If you can't get a job in IT you have been saved a life of misery.

its not so bad if you work in the IT dept of of a non-IT company. I worked for an IT consultancy and that we boring, but I now work in IT for a marketing company and its not too bad. Everyone would love to do a job which is really exciting and interesting but the reality is that not many people are doing their dream job.

I believe that work should not define you, you go to work do your job and get paid, thats all, its not your life

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same here, with power engineering graduates.

Also I think with IT it's a regional thing, with most jobs being centred in London and the SE. IT jobs are still plentiful there, so it may be that IT grads who don't want to/can't relocate make up the majority of the 11%

You mean they don't want to move to the most expensive place on earth where your 20's and 30's will be spent house sharing and getting into debt so that you can afford a few luxuries - like a fri night out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same here, with power engineering graduates.

Also I think with IT it's a regional thing, with most jobs being centred in London and the SE. IT jobs are still plentiful there, so it may be that IT grads who don't want to/can't relocate make up the majority of the 11%

IT is definately a regional thing, I live and work in London , I could not find the same job in Newcastle. Also my IT degreee did not give me the skills I needed for a job in IT, it got me the interview but everything I have learnt has been in the job rather than at university.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that work should not define you, you go to work do your job and get paid, thats all, its not your life

Work, including commuting time will consume the largest amount of time in your life. Therefore I disagree with what you say - work is very much your life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You mean they don't want to move to the most expensive place on earth where your 20's and 30's will be spent house sharing and getting into debt so that you can afford a few luxuries - like a fri night out.

Yes indeedy. Although IT jobs seem very well paid in the City. (Programmer/analysts circa 50k; project managers more) so I'm not sure how the affordability compares with elsewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Work, including commuting time will consume the largest amount of time in your life. Therefore I disagree with what you say - work is very much your life.

fair enough in terms of hours spent at work yes it is a part of your life but it doesnt define you as a person (thats all I was trying to say :) )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Work, including commuting time will consume the largest amount of time in your life. Therefore I disagree with what you say - work is very much your life.

Absolutely agree. Those of us who have truly enjoyed are careers are very, very lucky indeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes indeedy. Although IT jobs seem very well paid in the City. (Programmer/analysts circa 50k; project managers more) so I'm not sure how the affordability compares with elsewhere.

Those salaries are only attainable with relevant business experience.

Graduate money doesn't buy you an existence in London/SE unless you top up with debt

fair enough in terms of hours spent at work yes it is a part of your life but it doesnt define you as a person (thats all I was trying to say :) )

Absolutely, but working in an environment that you might dislike will have some negative effect on you - particularly in the longterm. I find the only way to cope with my dull IT work environment is to become dull and blend in with all the other dull non-questioning types that permeate through IT workforces. That's why I'm getting out. I would honestly rather be dead than spend the rest of my life in IT - it ain't a life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those salaries are only attainable with relevant business experience.

Graduate money doesn't buy you an existence in London/SE unless you top up with debt

Not always true. My 25 year old graduate son has just bought a 3 bed semi within 20 minutes of the City, on about 3.5 times sole income (plus deposit saved over last 5 years)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those salaries are only attainable with relevant business experience.

Graduate money doesn't buy you an existence in London/SE unless you top up with debt

Absolutely, but working in an environment that you might dislike will have some negative effect on you - particularly in the longterm. I find the only way to cope with my dull IT work environment is to become dull and blend in with all the other dull non-questioning types that permeate through IT workforces. That's why I'm getting out. I would honestly rather be dead than spend the rest of my life in IT - it ain't a life.

I felt the same way as you after working for 6 years for the same company I decdied to quit IT for a new career. Tried that for a year and realised it wasnt for me. I am now back in IT but the working enviroment is very different to the one I was in before. I am glad I tried something different but the grass isnt always greener ( but its good to say at least you tried)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not always true. My 25 year old graduate son has just bought a 3 bed semi within 20 minutes of the City, on about 3.5 times sole income (plus deposit saved over last 5 years)

Not being funny but there are some absolutely shit areas within 20mins of the City where I wouldn't choose to live even if I could afford a 20-bed mansion there. That statement doens't mean sh*t

And not every IT worker in London works in the city. Granted the City pays substantially higher salaries but they aren't available to all and they are far from secure. Banks hire and fire very quickly. I've been involved in working for a company responsible for bestshoring a large proportion of one of the largest IBs in the City. Lots of jobs gone to Chennai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely, but working in an environment that you might dislike will have some negative effect on you - particularly in the longterm. I find the only way to cope with my dull IT work environment is to become dull and blend in with all the other dull non-questioning types that permeate through IT workforces. That's why I'm getting out. I would honestly rather be dead than spend the rest of my life in IT - it ain't a life.

Can you define an IT environment, any more than you can define an engineering or a medical environment? There is such a wide range of jobs in every discipline that you can't easily do so.

Sitting down writing programming code must be vastly different to analysing a company's business needs and IT strategy for example.

Not being funny but there are some absolutely shit areas within 20mins of the City where I wouldn't choose to live even if I could afford a 20-bed mansion there. That statement doens't mean sh*t

And not every IT worker in London works in the city. Granted the City pays substantially higher salaries but they aren't available to all and they are far from secure. Banks hire and fire very quickly. I've been involved in working for a company responsible for bestshoring a large proportion of one of the largest IBs in the City. Lots of jobs gone to Chennai

He's bought in Shenfield, Essex, which is a very sought-after area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you define an IT environment, any more than you can define an engineering or a medical environment? There is such a wide range of jobs in every discipline that you can't easily do so.

Sitting down writing programming code must be vastly different to analysing a company's business needs and IT strategy for example.

He's bought in Shenfield, Essex, which is a very sought-after area.

Fair point. I have a general dislike for office environments in general. But spending most of your time in an office environment where the business is IT is just depressing. It's the sitting in an office lined up at desks, staring at a monitor. It's just such an unnatural existence. Do you think we evolved over millions of years to spend our lives like this?

He's bought in Shenfield, Essex, which is a very sought-after area.

Well, good for you - you got your little bit in about your son and how well hes' doing. Well done you and well done him!

Don't really see how it's relevant. He's clearly not representative of most young grads is he. If you think he is then you're out of touch with reality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair point. I have a general dislike for office environments in general. But spending most of your time in an office environment where the business is IT is just depressing. It's the sitting in an office lined up at desks, staring at a monitor. It's just such an unnatural existence. Do you think we evolved over millions of years to spend our lives like this?

Well, good for you - you got your little bit in about your son and how well hes' doing. Well done you and well done him!

Don't really see how it's relevant. He's clearly not representative of most young grads is he. If you think he is then you're out of touch with reality.

As with everything in life it's what you make of it. One of the fantastic things about IT is that it is so varied and it is relatively easy to move jobs.

I have had crap jobs in IT and I have had good ones same with everything in life, I have known when to move on and when I'm on to a good thing. However I left school at 16 and worked in some pretty crappy jobs before starting my IT career so I suppose I realise how lucky I am to be doing it which I expect most Grads wouldn't have a clue about.

Try working fulltime in a supermarket for £8,000 then get a job in IT where you earn £40,000+ really makes you appreciate things I can tell you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't really see how it's relevant. He's clearly not representative of most young grads is he. If you think he is then you're out of touch with reality.

It's relevant to counter your insinuation that everything's doom and gloom for graduates. Most of his graduate mates from schooldays have also bought, or are in the process of buying, in the same area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes indeedy. Although IT jobs seem very well paid in the City. (Programmer/analysts circa 50k; project managers more) so I'm not sure how the affordability compares with elsewhere.

£50k in a city where the average house price is £220k+, So to dollar City IT types can't actually afford to live there.

On the regional issue however, my mother in law gets asking us to move up to Liverpool with her, I keep telling her that there are no jobs and she doesn't believe me. I did a job search and in London there were something like 800+ matching my skills, in Liverpool there were exactly 0.

I extended the skills a little and there were still only 2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the regional issue however, my mother in law gets asking us to move up to Liverpool with her, I keep telling her that there are no jobs and she doesn't believe me. I did a job search and in London there were something like 800+ matching my skills, in Liverpool there were exactly 0.

I extended the skills a little and there were still only 2.

its the same for newcastle, most of the jobs up there are administrative low paying government jobs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

£50k in a city where the average house price is £220k+, So to dollar City IT types can't actually afford to live there.

On the regional issue however, my mother in law gets asking us to move up to Liverpool with her, I keep telling her that there are no jobs and she doesn't believe me. I did a job search and in London there were something like 800+ matching my skills, in Liverpool there were exactly 0.

I extended the skills a little and there were still only 2.

That's awful. I read my lads' computer weekly magazine, and the skills shortages and pay rates for most grad type jobs has been rising for some time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Around my area (Stratford-Evesham-Redditch) jobs are very poorly paid. Mostly admin and low paid government jobs also. It is little wonder house prices are having to come down. £40k would be considered exceptional and with an average semi at around £189k affordability is bringing reality into focus very quickly. £6-7 per hour is the going rate for the vast majority of jobs.

As the article seems to suggest, jobs in IT and computer skills generally hold out little hope with an 11% unemployment rate for Grads:

"Graduates with degrees in computer science had the highest unemployment rate, with nearly 11% thought to be not working or studying."
Edited by Realistbear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

£50k in a city where the average house price is £220k+, So to dollar City IT types can't actually afford to live there.

Well if they saved a deposit, and also realised that FTBs traditionally live in FTB-type propertries, rather than average type properties...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the regional issue however, my mother in law gets asking us to move up to Liverpool with her, I keep telling her that there are no jobs and she doesn't believe me. I did a job search and in London there were something like 800+ matching my skills, in Liverpool there were exactly 0.

I extended the skills a little and there were still only 2.

Maybe they will have to relocate the jobs further north when global warming sets in and submerges London :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.