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Jason

Have Britain's Interest Rates Peaked?

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.jhtm...3/ccrates13.xml

The first increase in a year surprised the City. Are there more in the pipeline? Robert Watts asks the experts
Mervyn King, the Governor of the Bank of England, paved the way for further interest rate rises last week. The Bank's latest Inflation Report, published on Wednesday, strongly suggested that this month's rate rise - from 4.5 per cent to 4.75 per cent - was the first of a series, rather than a "one-off tweak".
King suggested that there was a "50:50" chance of inflation rising above 3 per cent, one percentage point above the Bank's 2 per cent target rate. If that happens he will be obliged to write a formal letter to Gordon Brown, the Chancellor, explaining the situation - something that has not been necessary since the Bank took control of monetary policy more than nine years ago.
The move has left City economists divided over just how high inflation and interest rates will rise, and how consumer spending, manufacturing and Britain's wider economy will perform under tighter monetary policy.

Either the journalist made a typo, or David Hillier is a numpty.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.jhtm...3/ccrates13.xml

The first increase in a year surprised the City. Are there more in the pipeline? Robert Watts asks the experts
Mervyn King, the Governor of the Bank of England, paved the way for further interest rate rises last week. The Bank's latest Inflation Report, published on Wednesday, strongly suggested that this month's rate rise - from 4.5 per cent to 4.75 per cent - was the first of a series, rather than a "one-off tweak".
King suggested that there was a "50:50" chance of inflation rising above 3 per cent, one percentage point above the Bank's 2 per cent target rate. If that happens he will be obliged to write a formal letter to Gordon Brown, the Chancellor, explaining the situation - something that has not been necessary since the Bank took control of monetary policy more than nine years ago.
The move has left City economists divided over just how high inflation and interest rates will rise, and how consumer spending, manufacturing and Britain's wider economy will perform under tighter monetary policy.

Either the journalist made a typo, or David Hillier is a numpty.

May be David Hillier is from the same camp as David Smith, with the cut interest rates no matter what argument.

:lol:

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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