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JohnG

So, Now Irs Have Peaked..

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Yes, definitely. After a year of holding followed by a raise, the BoE will be just so eager to reduce rates.

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"Nonetheless, the Committee judges that some inflation risks remain. The extent and timing of any additional firming that may be needed to address these risks will depend on the evolution of the outlook for both inflation and economic growth, as implied by incoming information."

What are you on?

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Given the contrast of decisions by the BOE last Thursday, and the Fed today http://www.federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/pr...808/default.htm surely the next move for us will be down? :rolleyes:

just as well you haven't been listening to bloomberg then - seems that the BoE are now regarded as the leading inflation fighters in the world and further rises are expected

hope all the bulls have a nice fixed rate and haven't taken one of these nice trackers that have been pushed recently (i wonder why)

Edited by the end is nigh

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"Nonetheless, the Committee judges that some inflation risks remain. The extent and timing of any additional firming that may be needed to address these risks will depend on the evolution of the outlook for both inflation and economic growth, as implied by incoming information."

What are you on?

It will be a while yet before the BOE reduce rates . The FED started to increase rates 18 months ago and we have only just started.

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It will be a while yet before the BOE reduce rates . The FED started to increase rates 18 months ago and we have only just started.

Yep, the Fed increased rates seventeen times in a row before they paused. This pause is also probably aimed at preserving asset bubbles past the US November elections more than anything else?

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Oh, good point: I'd forgotten about the elections. Couldn't be having a rout in the stock market just before an election, could we?

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Yep, the Fed increased rates seventeen times in a row before they paused. This pause is also probably aimed at preserving asset bubbles past the US November elections more than anything else?

How much lower did the Fed reduce rates than the MPC?

They didn't have a whole lot lower to go before the screens turn blank.

Probably why they had rather further to go when it came to tightening, no?

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How much lower did the Fed reduce rates than the MPC?

They didn't have a whole lot lower to go before the screens turn blank.

Probably why they had rather further to go when it came to tightening, no?

I wondered how long it would take for somebody to point this out.

IIRC, the Fed started from a low of 1.5% whereas BOE started from a low of 3.25%. I might be 0.25% out either way on either of these, but I'm sure you get the idea.

BTW there was a small element of bear baiting in my OP, :P but I do feel that if there is another IRR it will be the last one before the BOE starts cutting rates again. :unsure:

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I wondered how long it would take for somebody to point this out.

IIRC, the Fed started from a low of 1.5% whereas BOE started from a low of 3.25%. I might be 0.25% out either way on either of these, but I'm sure you get the idea.

BTW there was a small element of bear baiting in my OP, :P but I do feel that if there is another IRR it will be the last one before the BOE starts cutting rates again. :unsure:

So the Fed raised rates 17 times, that means we need to raise rates to 6.75% - NICE!!!

:rolleyes:

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So the Fed raised rates 17 times, that means we need to raise rates to 6.75% - NICE!!!

:rolleyes:

Nope. The Fed slackened more than the BOE did following 9/11, and hence had to make a bigger correction, hence BOE = back to where we were 12-24 months ago, FED = 17 consecutive increases.

HTH <_<

Edited by JohnG

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Nope. The Fed slackened more than the BOE did following 9/11, and hence had to make a bigger correction, hence BOE = back to where we were 12-24 months ago, FED = 17 consecutive increases.

HTH <_<

You're making this rubbish up to try and wind people up. You ain't got a clue!

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"Nonetheless, the Committee judges that some inflation risks remain. The extent and timing of any additional firming that may be needed to address these risks will depend on the evolution of the outlook for both inflation and economic growth, as implied by incoming information."

What are you on?

Yes. There are inflationary pressures still in the pipe line.

1. Incresaed cost of energy oil, gas etc which will impact on both producers and consumers.

2. Unit labour cost which increased 4% Q2 (provisonal figures).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/prod2.nr0.htm

they will be worried that the relatively high unit labour cost - so called second round inflation effects don't become the norm.

They are not out of the woods yet.

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Over the past few years we have enjoyed low inflation in the UK because foreign goods have been getting cheaper and the government have been selective about how they calculate inflation. Although we have had a free ride for a few years, UK inflation is still a problem and interest rates will have to rise to reflect this.

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You're making this rubbish up to try and wind people up. You ain't got a clue!

Thank you for pointing out that some of my figures are wrong.

Could you please confirm what figures are wrong and what the correct figures should be?

Thanks in advance.

<_<

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You're making this rubbish up to try and wind people up. You ain't got a clue!

Agree with OzzMosiz. It's not your figures. It's what you make up from fuzzy concepts that's garbage.

Why aren't there ever any bulls with a half decent grasp of economics? Ah... Silly question.

Edited by Pooh Bear

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One of the guys on BBC News 24 yesterday was saying that the FED are ahead of the game and that the UK were behind.

What does that tell you?

What about Mervs speech earlier? Peaked? Not yet mate!! :lol:

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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