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Realistbear

Gas Bills Could Get A Bit Dear This Winter

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http://observer.guardian.co.uk/business/st...1838002,00.html

Gazprom's huge Venezuela gas deal alarms US

Conal Walsh
Sunday August 6, 2006
The Observer
Gazprom, Russia's
state-controlled
gas company, is risking a diplomatic row with the United States over a mooted multibillion-dollar pipeline investment in Venezuela.
The Russian gas giant is close to a deal on the project, according to Venezuela's firebrand President, Hugo Chavez, who has led opposition to US influence in Latin America.
News of the possible tie-up follows Gazprom's recently declared interest in investing in Bolivia, another regional enemy of the US, and is the latest sign of Moscow's deteriorating relationship with Washington.
It comes after the Russian President, Vladimir Putin, failed at the G8 summit in St Petersburg in July to secure American support for its entry to the World Trade Organisation.

Tick tock, tick tock...... :o

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World market--globalisation and all that.....

There are some worrying developments going on here I feel. Not wishing to be seen as a conspiracy theorist of any form, but... A couple of weeks ago Russia and Venezuela signed a deal for something like $3billion in arms supplies, then the Venezuelan President, Hugo Chavez, visited Iran and was award the Medal of Honor by the Iranian Presient.

Now we have Venezuela and Russia doing economic deals aswell. Might not be anything, but doesn't feel healthy in todays global climate.

AFP

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I don't see anything odd going on: Bush is picking on the world's energy suppliers because he's a ******tard, and they're ganging up against him in response.

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Great argument. I'm totally convinced. :rolleyes:

Look at this way, gold is priced at the same rate no matter where it is mined. Gas can be moved by pipeline over hundreds of miles and is not alocally priced commodity. Oil is a similarly priced world commodity with local markets affected by the global market. B)

I don't see anything odd going on: Bush is picking on the world's energy suppliers because he's a ******tard, and they're ganging up against him in response.

The oil companies, Shell, BP, Total and Exxon have a big stake in the world energy supply. George is here today gone tomorrow--Bush this Bush that--a little OTT? The power is the world corporations and their desire for profits. The Soviets, er Russians, are seeking to regain world dominance lost through the collapse of their socialist dream state (Miracle Economy that never was) through control of energy. Comply with the Politburo or else you freeze.

Edited by Realistbear

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Gas can be moved by pipeline over hundreds of miles and is not alocally priced commodity.

I work in the industry and I think you'll find that gas is is very much a locally priced commodity. If you compare gas prices at the NBP in the UK against those at Zeebrugge, TTF in the Netherlands or the Henry Hub in the US you'll find there is a great deal of difference. The news about Gazprom's proposed investement in Venezuela will have zero effect on gas prices in the UK tomorrow.

Still, if it suits your agenda...

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I work in the industry and I think you'll find that gas is is very much a locally priced commodity. If you compare gas prices at the NBP in the UK against those at Zeebrugge, TTF in the Netherlands or the Henry Hub in the US you'll find there is a great deal of difference. The news about Gazprom's proposed investement in Venezuela will have zero effect on gas prices in the UK tomorrow.

Still, if it suits your agenda...

I am sure you are right. However, what is at work here is a program to corner the market under Soviet control. We have seen how the Soviets, er Russians, have used gas to blackmail their former sattalite state into submission. It is a powerful political weapon and Putin wants to hold the cards. Now that is an agenda. <_<

Here is an example of the non-local aspect of gas prices:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/5242034.stm

Last Updated: Friday, 4 August 2006, 15:01 GMT 16:01 UK
India, Pakistan and Iran have agreed to appoint consultants in a bid to solve the issue of pricing over a proposed gas pipeline.
The project would carry natural gas more than 2,500 kms
(1,562 miles)
from Iran to India. Work could begin as early as next year.
Edited by Realistbear

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We have seen how the Soviets, er Russians, have used gas to blackmail their former sattalite state into submission.

Um, if I remember correctly, the 'Soviet' government were subsidising gas exports to the Ukraine, then Bush and his whacko mates funded anti-Russian parties in the country, leading to the election of an anti-Russian government. Is it any surprise that Putin didn't want to subsidise energy exports to an anti-Russian country?

It's hardly 'blackmail' to charge market rates for energy to a government who turns away from you.

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Um, if I remember correctly, the 'Soviet' government were subsidising gas exports to the Ukraine, then Bush and his whacko mates funded anti-Russian parties in the country, leading to the election of an anti-Russian government. Is it any surprise that Putin didn't want to subsidise energy exports to an anti-Russian country?

It's hardly 'blackmail' to charge market rates for energy to a government who turns away from you.

I think you have summed it up correctly.

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Look at this way, gold is priced at the same rate no matter where it is mined. Gas can be moved by pipeline over hundreds of miles and is not alocally priced commodity. Oil is a similarly priced world commodity with local markets affected by the global market. B)

The oil companies, Shell, BP, Total and Exxon have a big stake in the world energy supply. George is here today gone tomorrow--Bush this Bush that--a little OTT? The power is the world corporations and their desire for profits. The Soviets, er Russians, are seeking to regain world dominance lost through the collapse of their socialist dream state (Miracle Economy that never was) through control of energy. Comply with the Politburo or else you freeze.

all accurate.

but WHO precisely desires the relentless increase in profits??

.....look a little deeper and you will find the banks behind it.They demand profit to give to their investors.They also gain far more influence in the process than ANY government,even the US,could possibly entertain in their wildest imperialistic dreams.

banking is a global industry and works pretty much the same in most countries.

...could you see the link between gunning for the middle east,where islam prohibits usury,and the stealthy positioning of dubai,quatar and london as "sharia compliant" financial hubs.

the transition will take a few years but it certainly looks like the banks are going to take it by force,rather than the submission of china etc(which is rewarded by growth)The US WILL comply and become the hired hitman or lose it's financial backing,culminating in a horriffic depression.In a democracy,people don't take kindly to being visibly worse off and that's what the US govt are terrified of.

Edited by oracle

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Chavez is the new Castro: one of the few S.A leaders with sufficient cajones to stand up to the US, and the money to so do. Naturally the current US administration takes a pretty dim view of this. Although I don't anticipate it any time soon, I would not be surprised to see a US-lead invasion, or read that Chavez has died in some freak accident.

His relationship with neighboring Colombia (one of the few SA countries remaining pro-US) is interesting: whilst there's a huge amount of aggressive retoric flying back and forth, the two countries have just started work on a very interesting pipeline project.

This is definitely one to watch.

i

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Chavez is the new Castro: one of the few S.A leaders with sufficient cajones to stand up to the US, and the money to so do. Naturally the current US administration takes a pretty dim view of this. Although I don't anticipate it any time soon, I would not be surprised to see a US-lead invasion, or read that Chavez has died in some freak accident.

His relationship with neighboring Colombia (one of the few SA countries remaining pro-US) is interesting: whilst there's a huge amount of aggressive retoric flying back and forth, the two countries have just started work on a very interesting pipeline project.

This is definitely one to watch.

i

Who is going to stand up to the good guys though? Putin and his alliance with Iran may make life difficult once they control oil and gas around the world? But then again, we can trust the good guys against the wicked Mr. Bush who only wants to line the pockets of the filthy rich Arab Sheiks so they can build the tallest buildings in the world and import all those nice Turbo Bentley's. <_<

Castro may not last much longer as he has been very ill recently. His brother is next in line to the throne, er Presidency, in Cuba and its unlikley he has the Charisma that Field had. Chavez may see this as an opportunity to become the new Machismo Presidente Totalitario for the Southern Hemisphere?

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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