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My Mid-range Plan

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This forum has never failed to provide a wealth of informed comment and opinion, so here's a question for y'all:

I could do a job-swap in the next 2 months. I've no dependants, my current job doesn't have a final salary pension, I've no house or mortgage to tie me down, and no other circumstances that would cause one job to be more of a disadvantage than the other. All jobs carry the same salary (where one pays a small pension contribution, the others pay equivalent cash compensation) and are all in the same vein, although one is more hands-off than the rest.

I'm mid-30's, very educated (though you wouldn't guess that from my spelling or grammar) and the salaries these job-options carry are all higher than the UK national average:

1. Carry on working for my current employer, a blue-chip consumer electronics company in the outer South East, where I have a built up a good reputation.

2. Transfer to Japan and work for them there for a few years.

3. Work for a prestigious technology re-generation programme "up North" that has government funding for a minimum of 5 years.

4. Work for a successful Japanese communications company in America (San Jose).

Given that I've read everyone's (very intelligent) viewpoints regarding trends in economies, currencies, housing market, etc., I'm not about to fall into the house-buying trap and can obviously convert local earnings into other currencies or something else if necessary, what would you do if you were me? I have a large sterling deposit saved that I've invested wisely, taking into account all of the opinions on this board. Some of it I can get my hands on now, some would have to be left where it is.

What a choice! You can even thrown geo-politics into the mix if you want to consider N. Korea's actions... But... if all I want is to come out of the next 5 years with as much money as is possible for me to earn and to the best of my knowledge all of the jobs have the same prospects, what would you do?

AF.

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1. Carry on working for my current employer, a blue-chip consumer electronics company in the outer South East, where I have a built up a good reputation.

2. Transfer to Japan and work for them there for a few years.

3. Work for a prestigious technology re-generation programme "up North" that has government funding for a minimum of 5 years.

4. Work for a successful Japanese communications company in America (San Jose).

Hello

I've got no idea what u do, but from the list, I'd pick 2. I've always had a thing for Asian women :wub:

Seriously, change is always good especially if you're young. Every experience whether good or bad prepares you for the next problem - don't stick what your comfortable with. Challenge yourself...

Just my humble opinion,

crude.

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Hello

I've got no idea what u do, but from the list, I'd pick 2. I've always had a thing for Asian women :wub:

Seriously, change is always good especially if you're young. Every experience whether good or bad prepares you for the next problem - don't stick what your comfortable with. Challenge yourself...

Just my humble opinion,

crude.

Yep. Problem is, 3 of those 4 options are quite different and take me out of the comfort zone. I've been to Japan a few times and find it quite "quirky" and endearing... only been to Generica once for a few days... and "up North" only for the interview! All seem to have equal appeal...

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In my opinion mid-30's is not that young anymore...you have to think that if you take a job for just a couple of years, you will be soon over 40 and then it will be soon getting harder to get a job again....

Edited by Monopoly

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In my opinion mid-30's is not that young anymore...you have to think that if you take a job for just a couple of years, you will be soon over 40 and then it will be soon getting harder to get a job again....

If I transferred to Japan I can come back and carry on working here, if my job still exists in a few years! I'm in research & engineering and I'm at a fairly high job grade...

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I agree with Crude ... about the country and the women! ;) I guess wherever you go in the World there'll always be somewhere better you could be, but it's all about the expeience IMO. There was a Virgin advert once that said something along the lines of "When you get older you won't regret anything you've done, only what you didn't do"! If you don't like it, you can always come back again!?!

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In my opinion mid-30's is not that young anymore...you have to think that if you take a job for just a couple of years, you will be soon over 40 and then it will be soon getting harder to get a job again....

Seriously, do you think once you hit 40 that your going to have to stick with the same employer? If you've got the skills, age isn't a problem - you're in trouble without the skills though, but this guy/gal wouldn't have had these options without having something about them....

Be rash - do something different - I would grab these opportunities like a shot, if it weren't for a wife and two kids :mellow:

crude.

Edited by crudeFool

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Interesting that you've all gone for the Japan option so far. I was considering it more seriously than I am now a few years ago and in hind-sight should have taken the opportunity then. One thing that I don't like about Japan is that it's all very "neon and no soul", and I'd have no "base-line" - limited UK TV feeds for the occassional bit of light relief, etc, etc. I know that seems like a petty thing to say, but I'd have PLENTY of time to become over-familiar with the country, so I guess, amazing though it sounds, I'd want to stay at home some weekends!

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How can you possibly hope that we will be able to offer you advice here.

As you mention money isn't a much of a difference in those choices yet your main consideration is to maximise earnings.

IMHO it seems you really like the idea of doing something different but feel a bit cautious with anything other than option1. The only advice I could offer is ignore this atrocious "do nothing" advice:

In my opinion mid-30's is not that young anymore...you have to think that if you take a job for just a couple of years, you will be soon over 40 and then it will be soon getting harder to get a job again....

and live your life through what takes your fancy, you are never to old to try something new......go on try for option 2 or 4....you know you want to! :D

Edited by BTLOptingOut

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I was wondering whether 3 may be recommended by someone on here because of the widely-voiced opinion that the high-tech / IT sector will be hit hard by the coming downturn... it does have relevance to all-things-HPC

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I was wondering whether 3 may be recommended by someone on here because of the widely-voiced opinion that the high-tech / IT sector will be hit hard by the coming downturn... it does have relevance to all-things-HPC

3. Work for a prestigious technology re-generation programme "up North" that has government funding for a minimum of 5 years.

Surely if there was such a downturn, a guaranteed government funding can quickly disappear

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Surely if there was such a downturn, a guaranteed government funding can quickly disappear

But if the idea of the scheme is to ultimately create jobs, would they be seen to cull such a programme at the height of the misery?

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But if the idea of the scheme is to ultimately create jobs, would they be seen to cull such a programme at the height of the misery?

If the idea of the scheme is job creation then I would say it was on particuarly rocky foundations and subject to plug pulling should there be any change of administration.......public funded, job creation, IT, oop north.....if you haven't de-convinced yourself you certainly have me!

Under that basis here's my choice (i'm also mid-30's in technology with no ties):

4, 2, 1, 3

But you pays your money and takes your chances.

Edited by BTLOptingOut

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Very interesting choices... 3 being your least favourite. It's a public-private partnership by the way. I'd never considered the risk element, especially as most people's attitude is more like the one I need to adopt... to just go for it...

For me, there are elements such as the fact I work for a UK subsidiary and the Japanese parent company can (and I'm sure will) outsource work to China and other cheaper countries. That's putting a squeeze on wage rises and the ability of the company to perhaps compete for the best staff. We've had a lot of turnover recently. They are even talking about us sub-contracting work to companies in emerging labour markets.

(4) is a very good payer - a company with too much money trying to kick-start its R&D. But I think it's had one round of realisation that it can't just throw money at a bunch of talented individuals and hope to achieve breakthroughs...

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Well like I said in my first post - there's probably very little anyone here can add to help make your decision.

Apart from the salary/prospects which you cite as you main consideration the choices all seem very different. Perhapes it is a case of drawing straws?

The only advice I could reasonably offer is don't regret the choice you make, as only by making that decision did you get to sample the experiences offered by it. Every decision opens up new choices, it's better to have choices in life than none - good luck with whatever you decide.

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How can you possibly hope that we will be able to offer you advice here.

As you mention money isn't a much of a difference in those choices yet your main consideration is to maximise earnings.

IMHO it seems you really like the idea of doing something different but feel a bit cautious with anything other than option1. The only advice I could offer is ignore this atrocious "do nothing" advice:

and live your life through what takes your fancy, you are never to old to try something new......go on try for option 2 or 4....you know you want to! :D

Never said"do nothing" you arxx.....just some thing to think about....

Naaaaa, just go for the Japanese chicks.... :rolleyes:

Anyway..why would anybody asked a question like that on a website called housepricecrash, beats me... :blink:

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Never said"do nothing" you arxx.....just some thing to think about....

Naaaaa, just go for the Japanese chicks.... :rolleyes:

Anyway..why would anybody asked a question like that on a website called housepricecrash, beats me... :blink:

Me thinks your agressive talk is due to your own crap post.

So if you think the thread was so crap why did you bother responding to it?

and i'm an arxx?

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Never said"do nothing" you arxx.....just some thing to think about....

Naaaaa, just go for the Japanese chicks.... :rolleyes:

Anyway..why would anybody asked a question like that on a website called housepricecrash, beats me... :blink:

Because of the economic fall out of a worldwide HPC. Its effects may be significant and I thought I could get a "HPC slant" on it all to help me decide. What I actually got was some life-choice advice (i.e. don't even consider any impending HPC or economic downturn) and a few bemused readers wondering why I'd ask a question like that on hpc.co.uk. Still, all welcome...

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This forum has never failed to provide a wealth of informed comment and opinion, so here's a question for y'all:

I could do a job-swap in the next 2 months. I've no dependants, my current job doesn't have a final salary pension, I've no house or mortgage to tie me down, and no other circumstances that would cause one job to be more of a disadvantage than the other. All jobs carry the same salary (where one pays a small pension contribution, the others pay equivalent cash compensation) and are all in the same vein, although one is more hands-off than the rest.

I'm mid-30's, very educated (though you wouldn't guess that from my spelling or grammar) and the salaries these job-options carry are all higher than the UK national average:

1. Carry on working for my current employer, a blue-chip consumer electronics company in the outer South East, where I have a built up a good reputation.

2. Transfer to Japan and work for them there for a few years.

3. Work for a prestigious technology re-generation programme "up North" that has government funding for a minimum of 5 years.

4. Work for a successful Japanese communications company in America (San Jose).

Given that I've read everyone's (very intelligent) viewpoints regarding trends in economies, currencies, housing market, etc., I'm not about to fall into the house-buying trap and can obviously convert local earnings into other currencies or something else if necessary, what would you do if you were me? I have a large sterling deposit saved that I've invested wisely, taking into account all of the opinions on this board. Some of it I can get my hands on now, some would have to be left where it is.

What a choice! You can even thrown geo-politics into the mix if you want to consider N. Korea's actions... But... if all I want is to come out of the next 5 years with as much money as is possible for me to earn and to the best of my knowledge all of the jobs have the same prospects, what would you do?

AF.

As someone who works and researches in the fields of psychology and decision science, I guess this is something I ought to be able to help with! As a few posters have mentioned the key thing for being satisfied with your decision is to avoid regret afterwards. That's why my advice (and this might sound strange) is to stop thinking about it, sleep on it for a few nights, then go with your gut instinct.

Research has shown that for small decisions, post-decision satisfaction is greater when you consciously think about the best option, but the oppsite is true for large, complex decisions. There are two main reasons. Firstly, your conscious mind has relatively low 'bandwidth' and can only process a handful of attributes. Your subconscious is much better at using many pieces of information and combining them to reach a decision. Secondly, your conscious mind will therefore tend to focus on a few relevant pieces of information (those most readily available) and those will dominate the final decision. Its therefore easier to look back and start thinking 'what if...' about those particular aspects. It seems that in many cases your subconscious will make a better decision AND you'll be less likely to regret it afterwards.

Personally I'd go for one of the two options abroad, just because I love travelling and experiencing other cultures :)

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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