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drhewitt

The Us And Uk - Pros And Cons

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There have been a couple of threads on emigration. Here's my take on the USA. Yours may be the same or different.

I live in New Jersey but plan to move back to Ol' blighty (did I hear a gasp?). Why, you may ask? Well, I got my optimism from the US not the UK, and I'd like to think that things will get better, even if they get worse in the mean time.

Partial American hometruths - many move to Florida where the sun, sand, sea and surf await them. After 6 months, they wonder if the grass was really greener on the other side.

To each his own, everyone is different, has different character, personality, needs etc and the experience will be unique to you and you alone.

So, here we go, and feel free to add your own.

America - land of the free

Pros and cons

Houses are bigger. Gardens are big enough to build a pool (should you want to).

Cars are roomier.

Taxes are fairly low, but don't forget - you pay two taxes! Yes, that's right, Federal Tax and State Tax. Sometimes you pay a county tax too.

Contrary to those who say Brits pay no N.I. in the states, they do in a different form. Your social security tax is basically your pension and medicare tax pays 80% of Medicare recipients costs. Medicare and Medicaid is a federal program to help those who need health care/have kids, but can't afford insurance. You need to be destitute to receive this.

Health Care is not universal. You will pay through the nose for it. Case in point - I took my 18 month old daughter to the emergency room with a high fever. My wife has health insurance for herself and our daughter. Even with health insurance, we still paid $50 co-pay. Want to know the real bill? $2,500 for a 4 hour emergency room stay and painkillers. Life is not rosy here when you have no health care, you can go bankrupt in the process and lose everything you've worked for.

Even if you have insurance, it may not be enough if you need long term care, surgery etc. You may have to pay 20% of the cost.

The only advantage of health care here is that you pretty much get seen immediately - no waiting lists here.

Food here is much the same in the UK, it's bland and boring, high processed crap. Plenty of foreign cuisine though, Spanish, Mexican, Peruvian and Soul food.

Music is more R&B, rap and jazz. The UK is slowly catching on.

Wages are better here than in the UK and there are some good deals to be had. Plenty of "mail-in rebates" can often get you a product for free. Example, I got a FREE laser printer just by sending in those rebates.

There is no TV license fee here!

Weather in NJ is variable, much like the UK, only with less rain.

There is no maternity leave here, that is no PAID maternity leave. The government will give working mums 12 weeks off and they get to keep their job if, and when they go back.

Job seekers allowance, a.k.a. unemployment benefit is a lousy 13 weeks at 66% of your take home pay. Will they help you with rent, council tax or anything else? No way. But you might get a food stamps card and that will get you your basic groceries.

There is a huge housing bubble here, much like the UK - a house opposite me with 3 bedrooms is going for $375,000. We can't afford to buy in NJ, even if we stayed here.

Those of you who need brain food will not get much of it here - conversation is boring, bland and so is the crap that comes on 7 days a week on the boob-tube. Your 60 minutes watching friends would be better spent browsing books in Barnes and Noble. (I like Friends though :) )

Travelling in the USA is great - you need a car for independence, setting your own schedule, but there is a lot to see and do. Hikes, trails, historical sites, theme parks, America has it all - including parking fees before you get into Six Flags.

Clothing is cheap here and so are electrical goods.

Gas is still cheap compared to the UK, and I can get 300 miles to a tank on about $25.

Property taxes, a.k.a as council taxes are much more than the UK, at least in NJ. My friend is having to sell her house and downsize because she cannot afford the taxes - they are $6,000 in NJ and another friend pays $10,000 annually.

If you move to Florida, homes and taxes are less, but so are wages.

There are few decent watering holes and fewer that qualify as a pub. However, if you look hard enough, you might find the odd British establishment here and there. British food stuffs are notoriously overpriced - a small jar of Marmite sets me back $7.

Holidays are not guaranteed and most Americans only qualify for perhaps 2 weeks a year, 3 personal days and 5 sick days. After 10 years of continous employment, you might get 4 weeks. For myself, I get a week, barely enough to do anything and certainly not enough to satisfy spending time with both sides of the family.

The good, the bad and the ugly...

The American dream is still there, but fading. Unemployment is higher, taxes are higher and houses are out of reach for many, especially places like D.C., San Francisco, much of California and Florida (prices are beginning to fall though)

You will not see the ugly side of life in American brochures. Many cities have "projects" a.k.a. council estates - some more rougher than anywhere in England.

I was driving through Camden, New Jersey the other day - not a nice place. The murder capital of New Jersey and probably of anywhere else in the USA.

You will encounter many who are perhaps less fortunate than you are. African-Americans (the p.c. term to use) are born into a life of discrimination. Consequently, in many cities you will see large numbers of unemployed male African American's with nothing to do. There are some who do make it to the top, but they are few and far between.

As you may probably have seen on the news, Hurricane Katrina affected everyone, but particularly those who live in poverty. Need I say more?

England - Pros and Cons

Old Blighty has a special place in my heart. I still think it's the sick man of Europe, but take away the chavs, New Labour and the council estates and you have some nice places.

England has a MINIMUM of 4 weeks vacation. Add the bank holidays and PAID sick pay, and things aren't as bad as they seem.

England has PAID maternity benefits, with the first month or so paid at full time if you have a nice company. There is paterntiy leave and it is paid - even if it's 100 quid a week.

Laid off? Made redundant? Rent? You'll get most of your rent and council tax paid. The job seekers allowance is crap I know, but as long as the roof over your head is paid, that's the main thing.

Child benefit, non-existent in the States does help many mothers - and you get money for EACH child.

NHS care sucks to be sure, but it's FREE - you might die waiting for an op but you know you won't go bankrupt in the process.

Visiting a Doctor is FREE! I pay $100 to visit a Dr for 10 minutes of his time.

Ranting at 6.50 prescription costs? Try $108 - I paid that just to get some antibiotics.

Downers: gas is expensive, housing is poor quality and over priced and the underclass is growing.

Education is about the same. I studied in the UK and the USA and found the courses challenging and stimulating. You might moan about 3,000 pound fees, mine were 5 figure numbers, even with a scholarship.

Add your own, critique mine, whatever.

Edited by drhewitt

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Does any country other than the UK have a TV license fee?

Lots of countries have fees for cable TB, and b*gger all if you dont subscribe to cable.

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Cars are roomier.

Cars in the US are made of concrete and plastic. I was there recently and rented a massive V8 buick with about as much power as a Micra.

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The US.... Guns, rampant religion, saluting the flag in school, workaholism, despising the poor... no way would I move to the States! Hmm, would I rather live in a country run by the Republicans or New Labour :lol: ? Lovely scenery though.

I have been thinking of moving to Canada (I was born there) but I think it would be too difficult with work, and it would mean taking the only grandkids out of the country. I'd miss the UK a lot and I want to bring my kids up to be Brits. I like the culture here and I love being an hour or two away from mainland Europe.

Welome back when you do return, Dr Hewitt!

Rachel

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I have lived about equal time in the both the US and the UK. Born in the UK though.

My experience in the US was primarily in San Diego, California where:

1. Houses are incredibly expensive. Along the coastal corridor--a strip about 5 miles wide--the weather is as close to perfect as you will find anywhere in the world. Average temp is about 70F all year round. But average houses along the strip are around $650,000 and condos about $450,000. SD is due for a mega crash and YoY has just recently turned negative. The Great Crash, which coincided with the UK, saw 30% or more wiped off house prices in 2 years.

2. Traffic is a nightmare. The main artery, HWY 5 is almost gridlocked 24/7.

3. Gas/petrol is about the same price as England because you have to drive twice as far to get to anything. Car insurance was about $800 a year whereas I am paying 189 pounds here for similar coverage. REpair costs etc. are a rip off in the UK so you have to be careful where you take your car for service. Avoid dealers at all costs. IN the US I paid $30 for an oil service on my Honda Prelude at the main dealer. I run an Audi in the UK and the dealer wanted 148 pounds for an oil change. Madness.

4. Food and clothing is about the same and restaurants are getting much higher due to fuel costs and wages to pay for those house prices. Starbucks in the US runs about $2.89 for a large Cappacino and the same in pounds here.

5. Property taxes are on another planet. You pay roughly 1.25% of the cost of the house every year. So your average gaff at around $650,000 will cost you $8,125 a year and rising by about 2% each year you are in the house. At current exchnage rates that is about 4,276 pounds.

6. Unless you are into the beach there is not a lot else to do. No national trust or heritage places to visit. The mountains are about 100 miles away and there is skiing in the winter but who wants to fight the traffic? I was never into the bar-club scene but it exists if you like it. If you are into boats it is a sailors paradise. Fishing is also meant to be excellent too and its year round in the perpetual summer weather. Bottom line for water-oriented people: SD is unbeatable and they have the world's second best beach on Coronado Island.

7. Medical costs are enormous. Unless you have a job that provides an HMO plan you will go bankrupt if you need hospitalisation. But the care you get is fnatastic. I was part of the Kaiser Permanente Scheme (its coming to the UK to take over sopme NHS stuff) and you pay $10 for an office visit and the same for prescriptions. Dental care was also A+ and even without insurance a lot cheaper than the UK. A crown was $650 whereas I understrand they run about 450 pounds in the UK.

8. Cars are cheaper. An Audi A4 is around $32k whereas in the UK it is around 24k for a similar model. A Honda Accord can be bought for about $20k whereas the UK will cost you 20k pounds.

9. Wages are higher. An average admin-secretary type job pays about $17 an hour and if you work for the State or some other government institution you will get medical benefits and a fanatstic retirement program that matches 2:1.

10. IF you live on the coastal strip there is not a lot of obvious street crime of Chav types. IF you end up in the wrong area you may encounter some brutal Hispanic gangs who are now pushing out the once dominant African-American gangs (Crips and Bloods). San Diego has minimal gang type activity compared with LA about 80 miles up the coast.

11. Contrary to the TV image of the US--I found none of the gun-toting, flag waving, Bible bashing to be present. That seems to exist more in the minds of Anti-American liberals that have replaced the old Labour-Scargill brigade.

On the other hand England and why I came back--again:

1. Its a much more interesting country and I relate to the heritage.

2. The NHS may not be good overall but I find my local Dr. to be excellent. Bit worried about dental though.

3. We now have Costco which was our favourite shop in the US.

4. Food here is MUCH better. Not saying restauarants are unless you pay ridiculous prices, but everyday stuff tastes better. Bread, cheese, meats and veg all taste like they should. English biscuits are unbeatable and you pay a fortune for imports in the US!

5. Variety. I found most of America to be a bit bland with a sameness everywhere. There is not much rooom for individuality and eccentricity is regarded as "madness." English TV--the old classic comedies--is much better. OUr plays and drama series are better with the exception of the Sopranos which, IMO, is possibly the best TV drama of all time.

6. Weather here is not bad lately with decent summers. The variety of seasons makes a change from San Diego's perpetual summer.

7. Work-wise it is less stressful in the UK if you are in the right thing. IN the US you only get 2 weeks vacation to start and will probably max out at 4 weeks after 15 years service. Their work day is also longer--8-5 as you get an unpaid hour for lunch.

8. Europe is on the doorstep for even more variety.

Bottom line: The HPC will improve life for many once it has blown through and removed the insanity this country finds itself in. I am certain that the poisons we are seeing hatch out recently in the form of bankruptcy, unemployment and repossessions will increase in the coming weeks and that the housing problem will adjust itself to the fundamentals within about 3 year. I will then buy a house and enjoy living here again.

Edited by Realistbear

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America and england are full of loud mouthed chavy oil-theivin big headed scum who all think the world owes them a living and are prepared to bomb, maim and murder anyone who thinks otherwise

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America and england are full of loud mouthed chavy oil-theivin big headed scum who all think the world owes them a living and are prepared to bomb, maim and murder anyone who thinks otherwise

Its our turn though! The Germans had a go in 1939-45 after the first attempt in 1914-1918. Their Chavs were better dressed though--black uniforms and matching boots. Throughout history different nations have taken the lead in killing. As things stand, the greatest mass murderer of all time was Mao followed by Uncle Joe Stalin and a distant third comes Uncle Adolf. Our leaders have not overseen numbers at those levels but the prize might go to Winston if its pure numbers we are looking at. FDR-Truman would be up there also.

Put in perspective, the 20-40 a day Shi-ites that are being killed by Sunnis in Iraq is quite small. Even Israel in the latest round has only taken out about 800 whereas Saddam would grease that many a day during his ethnic cleansing of the Kurds.

Overall, the prize still goes to Mao with a body count of 70,000,000.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/from...dent/219061.stm

http://www.gmu.edu/departments/economics/b...omfaq.htm#part7

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"11. Contrary to the TV image of the US--I found none of the gun-toting, flag waving, Bible bashing to be present. That seems to exist more in the minds of Anti-American liberals that have replaced the old Labour-Scargill brigade."

RB, you need to visit the bible belt to see the bible bashing. There seemed to be just as many churches as gas stations down there. The flag waving is also very prominent in these states. Southern CA is very different from middle TN.

I agree with all your other points though. Petrol is cheaper than the UK, but you use a hell lot more of it than the typical brit.

Between my wife and I we consume 90 gallons of petrol a week. This is just to go to work, shopping and the occassional trip. In the UK that would be over 400L per week!

Surburbia is going to be the death of the USA. Read some of Kunslter's blogs.

http://www.kunstler.com/index.html

Edited by Pluto

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Ireland has a TV licence fee it costs €155. And they only get RTE 1 and 2 and RTE Radio 1 and 2 out of that. AND these channels still carry adverts. Thats a poor deal compared to the BBC, never thought I would say that.

Nothing wrong with having the US flag in schools, I wish we were more patrotic, instead of only flag waving when theres football on.

I found the clothes in the states don't fit me they are all too long and big esp t shirts.

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It is difficult for me to believe that after George Herbert Walker Bush was Prsedient out of 300 million Americans the best person to be the next President was his son George Herbert Walker Bush. To me this suggests there is something not quite healthy about the American Presidential selection process. Imagine Mark Thatcher taling over from his mum.

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there is an arc of extremism spreading

across the west

extreme greed

anyone who stands in the way of this greed will be bombed

fat blubbery westerners bombing deprived 3rd world paupers so they can get fatter

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there is an arc of extremism spreading

across the west

extreme greed

anyone who stands in the way of this greed will be bombed

fat blubbery westerners bombing deprived 3rd world paupers so they can get fatter

tip - its a bit embarrassing seeing saps airing their liberal guilt complexes in public.

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It is difficult for me to believe that after George Herbert Walker Bush was Prsedient out of 300 million Americans the best person to be the next President was his son George Herbert Walker Bush. To me this suggests there is something not quite healthy about the American Presidential selection process. Imagine Mark Thatcher taling over from his mum.

Yes, and the next president could be Hilary Clinton and I read rumblings Jed Bush would like to have a run in 2012. England has the royal family and the US has the Bush and Clinton clan.

Edited by Pluto

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I have lived about equal time in the both the US and the UK. Born in the UK though.

My experience in the US was primarily in San Diego, California where:

1. Houses are incredibly expensive. Along the coastal corridor--a strip about 5 miles wide--the weather is as close to perfect as you will find anywhere in the world. Average temp is about 70F all year round. But average houses along the strip are around $650,000 and condos about $450,000. SD is due for a mega crash and YoY has just recently turned negative. The Great Crash, which coincided with the UK, saw 30% or more wiped off house prices in 2 years.

2. Traffic is a nightmare. The main artery, HWY 5 is almost gridlocked 24/7.

3. Gas/petrol is about the same price as England because you have to drive twice as far to get to anything. Car insurance was about $800 a year whereas I am paying 189 pounds here for similar coverage. REpair costs etc. are a rip off in the UK so you have to be careful where you take your car for service. Avoid dealers at all costs. IN the US I paid $30 for an oil service on my Honda Prelude at the main dealer. I run an Audi in the UK and the dealer wanted 148 pounds for an oil change. Madness.

4. Food and clothing is about the same and restaurants are getting much higher due to fuel costs and wages to pay for those house prices. Starbucks in the US runs about $2.89 for a large Cappacino and the same in pounds here.

5. Property taxes are on another planet. You pay roughly 1.25% of the cost of the house every year. So your average gaff at around $650,000 will cost you $8,125 a year and rising by about 2% each year you are in the house. At current exchnage rates that is about 4,276 pounds.

6. Unless you are into the beach there is not a lot else to do. No national trust or heritage places to visit. The mountains are about 100 miles away and there is skiing in the winter but who wants to fight the traffic? I was never into the bar-club scene but it exists if you like it. If you are into boats it is a sailors paradise. Fishing is also meant to be excellent too and its year round in the perpetual summer weather. Bottom line for water-oriented people: SD is unbeatable and they have the world's second best beach on Coronado Island.

7. Medical costs are enormous. Unless you have a job that provides an HMO plan you will go bankrupt if you need hospitalisation. But the care you get is fnatastic. I was part of the Kaiser Permanente Scheme (its coming to the UK to take over sopme NHS stuff) and you pay $10 for an office visit and the same for prescriptions. Dental care was also A+ and even without insurance a lot cheaper than the UK. A crown was $650 whereas I understrand they run about 450 pounds in the UK.

8. Cars are cheaper. An Audi A4 is around $32k whereas in the UK it is around 24k for a similar model. A Honda Accord can be bought for about $20k whereas the UK will cost you 20k pounds.

9. Wages are higher. An average admin-secretary type job pays about $17 an hour and if you work for the State or some other government institution you will get medical benefits and a fanatstic retirement program that matches 2:1.

10. IF you live on the coastal strip there is not a lot of obvious street crime of Chav types. IF you end up in the wrong area you may encounter some brutal Hispanic gangs who are now pushing out the once dominant African-American gangs (Crips and Bloods). San Diego has minimal gang type activity compared with LA about 80 miles up the coast.

11. Contrary to the TV image of the US--I found none of the gun-toting, flag waving, Bible bashing to be present. That seems to exist more in the minds of Anti-American liberals that have replaced the old Labour-Scargill brigade.

On the other hand England and why I came back--again:

1. Its a much more interesting country and I relate to the heritage.

2. The NHS may not be good overall but I find my local Dr. to be excellent. Bit worried about dental though.

3. We now have Costco which was our favourite shop in the US.

4. Food here is MUCH better. Not saying restauarants are unless you pay ridiculous prices, but everyday stuff tastes better. Bread, cheese, meats and veg all taste like they should. English biscuits are unbeatable and you pay a fortune for imports in the US!

5. Variety. I found most of America to be a bit bland with a sameness everywhere. There is not much rooom for individuality and eccentricity is regarded as "madness." English TV--the old classic comedies--is much better. OUr plays and drama series are better with the exception of the Sopranos which, IMO, is possibly the best TV drama of all time.

6. Weather here is not bad lately with decent summers. The variety of seasons makes a change from San Diego's perpetual summer.

7. Work-wise it is less stressful in the UK if you are in the right thing. IN the US you only get 2 weeks vacation to start and will probably max out at 4 weeks after 15 years service. Their work day is also longer--8-5 as you get an unpaid hour for lunch.

8. Europe is on the doorstep for even more variety.

Bottom line: The HPC will improve life for many once it has blown through and removed the insanity this country finds itself in. I am certain that the poisons we are seeing hatch out recently in the form of bankruptcy, unemployment and repossessions will increase in the coming weeks and that the housing problem will adjust itself to the fundamentals within about 3 year. I will then buy a house and enjoy living here again.

Hi RB, nice comments

Traffic is a nightmare in New Jersey - the roads I hate to travel include Interstate 80, Route 17, Route 46 and I-95. I live about 12 miles from New York City, and it takes forever to cross the George Washington Bridge and the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels.

I'm fortunate that I live 10 minutes away from my job, and the traffic is not to bad, even on the way home.

I've noticed that Starbucks is more expensive, Dunkin' Donuts included. The coffees, as usual, are great.

Depending on where you live there may be many or few things to do. I like the beach, but I don't like massively crowded beaches you have to pay to get on. We try and find lakes in upstate New York that are not well known - where you can BBQ and swim without feeling like you have to step over someone. New York has some great hikes.

Cars are cheaper, agree with you there. I drive a Ford Focus, nice little runner, good on gas, bad on gas when the AC is on - and we've had some really hot days in the last month.

The two towns that border Clifton are notorious for gangs and drugs. You know the places to avoid, even in day time. I hate going into Passaic, I stick out like a sore thumb.

America is a largely homogenous place - the same strip malls you pass on the way to work are found in all areas of the country. Small town America, if it interests you, is fascinating to explore.

We did the Jamestown, Williamsburg tours - I plan on visiting again during Virignia's quadcentennial in 2007.

Visited Floria, New York, Vermont (great maple syrup to be found there), Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts. My goal is to visit all 50 states, I won't be able to do it I know, but it's nice to try.

I have just Maine and New Hampshire to visit and I will have visited all the North Eastern states. I've never been further than Chicago and Kentucky. Down south as far as the North Carolina border (driving that is). Pennsylvania is a great state to visit, so much history and culture - done the Amish thing and the Renaissance Fairs. Philadelphia is a nice city to visit. Baltimore is nice in the summer.

New Jersey has one of six, Six Flags amusement parks in the USA - not worth it i.m.h.o. - you pay $15 to park your car, $70 to get in and you get maybe 6 rides in 8 hours of being there. The lines are long.

Movies are very big here, everyone goes. Home DVD's and video have not killed off that pasttime. There is a huge variety of great places to eat. New Jersey has fishing along the shore, though I've never fished myself.

I play baseball with my friends - not really into American football. I rarely watch baseball on TV, the only match I saw were the Redsox.

Soccer is non-existent in my area.

The town I live in has a mix - mostly white with a sprinkling of Puerto Ricans, Dominicans. There are a lot of Turkish people down my street. Most cultures stick to themselves and rarely mix outside their group.

Edited by drhewitt

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Hi Dr Hewitt, thanks for posting this insight between the UK and US. This interests me because I have always wanted to get out of the UK and the US has been a place where I would like to live. A few things put me off:

1. Only 10 days holiday.

2. Having to work so hard (apparently)

3. Worries I will eventually be just a pissed off about being there as here and will want to move back!

The comparisons about the health care are interesting. Right now i think that a private system funded by insurance would be better than what we have in the UK. There may be people who won't afford it but surely most jobs will come with insurance as standard (as in the US?) I have rsi in my hands, the pain affects me up my arm, across my shoulder and into my neck. I've had this for a year and after mis-diagnosis of shoulder problems by my doctor I had to fight to be referred to the hospital to diagnose what it is. I had to chnage doctor to get them to do anything, and when i did get referred in April i have now only just been seen. The consultant says its rsi (no shit) and has referred me for physio of my hands. Surely the doctor could have done that in the first place? I have waited 4 months and I am not confident of the consultants diagnosis, it sounds like carpal tunnel syndrome to me. The point of the ramble is that I feel had this country have got a private healthcare sytem ie the NHS was privatised and a system like the USA was introduced..... all this delay and misdiagnosis would not happen. People would get seen - properly and quickly and efficiently.

Or am I wrong?

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Does any country other than the UK have a TV license fee?

I haven't checked all of the third world yet but countries without TV licences seem to be the exception rather than the rule. A few countries incorporate the TV licence fee into the electricity bill regardless of whether you have a TV or not.

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Hi Dr Hewitt, thanks for posting this insight between the UK and US. This interests me because I have always wanted to get out of the UK and the US has been a place where I would like to live. A few things put me off:

1. Only 10 days holiday.

2. Having to work so hard (apparently)

3. Worries I will eventually be just a pissed off about being there as here and will want to move back!

The comparisons about the health care are interesting. Right now i think that a private system funded by insurance would be better than what we have in the UK. There may be people who won't afford it but surely most jobs will come with insurance as standard (as in the US?) I have rsi in my hands, the pain affects me up my arm, across my shoulder and into my neck. I've had this for a year and after mis-diagnosis of shoulder problems by my doctor I had to fight to be referred to the hospital to diagnose what it is. I had to chnage doctor to get them to do anything, and when i did get referred in April i have now only just been seen. The consultant says its rsi (no shit) and has referred me for physio of my hands. Surely the doctor could have done that in the first place? I have waited 4 months and I am not confident of the consultants diagnosis, it sounds like carpal tunnel syndrome to me. The point of the ramble is that I feel had this country have got a private healthcare sytem ie the NHS was privatised and a system like the USA was introduced..... all this delay and misdiagnosis would not happen. People would get seen - properly and quickly and efficiently.

Or am I wrong?

In the US my experience with medical care was excellent. They believe in preventative medicine and make sure you have a thorough check up annually. This includes blood tests, prostate if you are male over 40, BP, heart etc. In the UK you have to ask for a blood test which I did only to discover I had high cholestrol. Had I not taken the initiative to ask for a blood test the problme would have gone undetected for years no doubt. I am certain Gordon wants to dismanle the NHS as eviodenced by the enormous job cuts and lack of investment. My former US HMO provider, Kaiser Permenente, are in negotiations with the government to see how a US-style HMO will work in the UK. The monthly premium for a family of 4 in the US is around $850.00 so get ready as everything in the UK is pounds for dollars which means premiums of significant size may be coming. Its a Miracle Economy dontcha know--we can just charge the cost to a credit card. <_<

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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