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BBC Article on Rates

When you say "The Bank of England is widely expected to leave rates unchanged for the 12th time in a row later" you give no indication to what institutions you are representing in this statement, and the same by using "Analysts predict the Bank will leave rates at 4.5%" Which Analysts are these?

Again with "Experts say the Bank is likely to delay any rise in the face of an uncertain global economic outlook and the risk rising fuel prices pose to growth."

What Experts?

This is article is of very low journalistic talent and shows little or no effort by the author and serves nothing more then to spin the brutal truth of inflation in this country and trying to manipulate the decision against a rate rise.

A rate rise is what's needed to end this countries obsession with property speculation, and curb the unsavory appetite for debt.

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This is article is of very low journalistic talent and shows little or no effort by the author and serves nothing more then to spin the brutal truth of inflation in this country and trying to manipulate the decision against a rate rise.

Thats cos they've simply copied and pasted today's [pre-MPC decision] Treasury press release

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Ha. I have just written to the BBC stating the same. The headline could of gone either way and in actual fact should of remained unbias as the decision is close and only slightly favours a hold. So why this headline.

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BBC Article on Rates

When you say "The Bank of England is widely expected to leave rates unchanged for the 12th time in a row later" you give no indication to what institutions you are representing in this statement, and the same by using "Analysts predict the Bank will leave rates at 4.5%" Which Analysts are these?

Again with "Experts say the Bank is likely to delay any rise in the face of an uncertain global economic outlook and the risk rising fuel prices pose to growth."

What Experts?

This is article is of very low journalistic talent and shows little or no effort by the author and serves nothing more then to spin the brutal truth of inflation in this country and trying to manipulate the decision against a rate rise.

A rate rise is what's needed to end this countries obsession with property speculation, and curb the unsavory appetite for debt.

I have a friend who works for a survey company. He frequently supplies the BBC with information which they misquote and produce graphs with mislabelled axis. When he rings them to tell them they thank him and then don't bother to change it.

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In the case of the BBC, it would be madness for them to bite the hand that feeds them.

To even the most neutral of observers, there does now appear to be a very unbalanced reporting of info relating to the economy and the housing market in particular. If, as is suspected by RB and some others, the MPC is being steered from central government, and if, as I understand it, government (through licence fees) funds the BBC, then is it not reasonable to draw the conclusion that the BBC and MPC are being in manipulated in harmony?

Is it possible to think of the two bodies as the media and policy arm of a larger organisation? You can see it; the BBC tells the world that the economy is doing well, the MPC backs it up with its monetary policy, and the government can continue sing the ‘everything is rosy’ song.

I am not one for conspiracy theories, but there is a body of evidence amassing that seems to point toward problems in the economy (building companies reporting losses, and more importantly share holders losing confidence in building stock, then there are emerging reports of housing inflation slowdowns, masses of bad debt stories coming to the fore, and now almost daily reports of job losses en mass). However, none of these rather worrying stories seem to get even a nod when looking at interest rates and house price inflation.

Not only the BBC, but the BBC in particular, seem to leap with fervour and elation to any report from banks or estate agents that house prices are rising like it is the best news in the world, but then confine to one or two lines any cautionary statement from other less vested parties.

- End ill-informed rant –

OD

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I did a quick search using Google news, and the BBC's reporting seems to be inline with the general expectation of how things are going to pan out - I didn't see any articles expecting a rise (or for that matter a drop), about 30% had it too clase to call, and the rest forcast it holding steady.

In fact I think that the BBC's "experts/analysts" came from this artice by reuters (surely no VI here?):

http://today.reuters.com/business/newsarti...ryID=nL02930838

"Following a spate of strong economic reports, seven out of 46 economists polled by Reuters last week expect the Monetary Policy Committee to lift rates to 4.75 percent on Thursday, reversing a hotly-debated decision to cut them one year ago. "

BBC doesn't tend to name their sources, perhaps to disguise the fact that they were too lazy to do their own survey ;-)

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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