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Hot sunny weather? People using too much leccy?

Shame we've not got more solar stuff.

Maybe we should install solar fans and air conditioning units?

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Hot sunny weather? People using too much leccy?

Shame we've not got more solar stuff.

Maybe we should install solar fans and air conditioning units?

The energy requirements of air-conditioning are huge - kilowatts.

To generate that much from photovoltaics would require an investment of tens of thousands of pounds.

The loss of interest alone on that investment exceeds the value of leccy saved.

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Hot sunny weather? People using too much leccy?

Shame we've not got more solar stuff.

Maybe we should install solar fans and air conditioning units?

A Couple of solar panels on every roof in the country and there would be no problem...

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Guest Alright Jack

Hot sunny weather? People using too much leccy?

Shame we've not got more solar stuff.

Maybe we should install solar fans and air conditioning units?

And in fifty years time they may prove cost / energy effective.

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I'm somewhat puzzled as to why hydro output is said to be down. Average output obviously due to warm, dry (I assume) weather. But that shouldn't greatly affect peak generating capacity (which is what counts in this case) so it sounds a little strange. Or are the owners of these plants doing maintenance in the middle of Summer when the rest of the world (at leat that part where it gets hot) worked out long ago that Autumn and Spring are the power plant maintenance seasons.

As for restarting oil-fired plant, enough said really. Just wait until peak load use becomes baseload (24/7) when gas becomes sufficiently scarce to be more expensive than oil (which itself won't be helped by increased oil demand for power generation). Trouble ahead...

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A Couple of solar panels on every roof in the country and there would be no problem...

A "couple of solar panels" generates at most a few hundred watts on a sunny day, and very little on a cloudy winter's day.

Purchase and installation costs thousands of pounds.

How does that solve the country's problems?

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A "couple of solar panels" generates at most a few hundred watts on a sunny day, and very little on a cloudy winter's day.

Purchase and installation costs thousands of pounds.

How does that solve the country's problems?

Its about insulating and using less as well as generating locally.

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At present, insulation and energy-saving light bulbs are about the only energy-related improvements that make economic sense for the average householder.

Even double-glazing costs more than it will ever save in energy.

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UKC is the solution!

UK COAL (LSE:UKC.L) Edit

Last Trade: 197.75 p

Trade Time: 2:06PM

Change: Up 2.25 (1.15%)

Prev Close: 195.50

Open: 196.50

Bid: 197.75

Ask: 198.00

1y Target Est: 155.00

KEY STATISTICS

52 wks change(1 yr): +13.08%

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I'm somewhat puzzled as to why hydro output is said to be down. Average output obviously due to warm, dry (I assume) weather. But that shouldn't greatly affect peak generating capacity (which is what counts in this case) so it sounds a little strange. Or are the owners of these plants doing maintenance in the middle of Summer when the rest of the world (at leat that part where it gets hot) worked out long ago that Autumn and Spring are the power plant maintenance seasons.

As for restarting oil-fired plant, enough said really. Just wait until peak load use becomes baseload (24/7) when gas becomes sufficiently scarce to be more expensive than oil (which itself won't be helped by increased oil demand for power generation). Trouble ahead...

Hydro needs water pressure and I think there is a lack of it. (water that is).

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Hydro needs water pressure and I think there is a lack of it. (water that is).

S'ot that we're using air conditioning and that reduces the amount of spare elec?

Oh and aren't loads of power stations shut at the moment too?

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Basically, decades of government interference in the power-generation market means we're pretty much ******ed in an era of high fuel costs: the only half-sensible short-term solutions I can see for the UK are coal and nukes.

Of course we don't have any coal mines anymore, but I'm sure we can find Polish miners willing to work for minimum wage to build a load.

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Hydro needs water pressure and I think there is a lack of it. (water that is).

Unless the storages have been run to zero (in which case that is poor management unless there has been literally zero rain) then they should still be able to produce at full output when needed.

In short, it's normal practice (at least in Australia where I am) to maintain adequate water in hydro storages to always enable operation at times of highest power demand. Depending on water inflows, they MAY also run at other times. Not enough water? Just run thermal plants harder at off peak times (switching off the hydro plants) and keep the hydro for times of highest demand thus avoiding power shortages.

Of has there been literally no rain at all for quite some time (months)?

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UK hydro plants are really energy storage facilities.

They use excess electricity, at off peak times, to pump water from the lower lake up hill to the top lake. When the peak demand comes along they reverse the water turbines and generate electicity.

Why do they do it that way? Simple our mountains are not that high and do not generate enough 'powerful' run off.

I believe we have two such plants, one in Wales and the other in Scotland. My description is based on the plant in Scotland, the Welsh plants may be different, but I doubt it.

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It'd cost many thousands of pounds worth of photovoltaic panels to provide one household with half its energy needs (prices would vary according to supplier and cost of fitting) - it's nonsense unless you've got money to burn. It's not a viable solution unless you're a mentalist

Instead of us using less, perhaps the Americans could come into line? The average US household uses TWICE as much electricity as the average UK household.

In the meantime ;-) we should go for clean coal (as the Americans are doing) and also start extracting much more energy from our waste.

As for biofuels - I think George Monbiot hit the nail on the head there -

If you wanted to power an entire house on renewables (not just photovoltaic electric, which is v eexpensive), perhaps you're looking at an investment of 40k for the average house.

One strategy would be to invest in the most energy efficient appliances available in Europe and then the average power requirement would enable you to cut the investment to £10-20,000, as our German friends recently discovered during a research programme.

But, as you can calculate - the payback period would be a long one.

As an alternative, buy green electricity from a company like Ecotricity - probably a much more efficient way of investing in renewable energy!

By the way, watch out for low energy lightbulbs - many pose a health risk if they're broken as they contain Mercury! In some US states, it is compulsory to recycle them as if they go into landfill, all that luverly Mercury seeps into the environment.

This issue doesn't seem to have raised its head on this side of the pond - as the Gvmnt's priority is energy efficiency, not preventing contamination of the environment with a neurotoxin.

Cheers

G

Edited by gruffydd

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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