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RichM

Buy A House.

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Just do it.

Go on, buy a house.

A really big one. With laminate flooring. And a garage.

Max out your credit card buying cheap tat from Ikea to make your place look nice.

When at Ikea make sure to get a folder to store all your "doommonger" clippings from the newspaper in. Get them out from time to time and chuckle.

Sit back in your Shangri-La, your bubble, and forget about the economy, how we might produce real wealth or add value. Take at face value all the stats we hear about low unemployment and growth. Don't dwell on the levels of debt, or rumours of inflation in the far-East. Why should that bother you are relaxing in your own home?

Watch house prices go up more. Congratulate yourself for buying now, when property is still affordable. Laugh at the doomsters who didn't buy in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, or 2007. See how house prices keep on rising! They can't be stopped!

But hang on - IRs are now 5.25%.

The market has slowed. High street banks and estate agents are trying to calm every one: the market is still OK, the market is still OK.

You try and relax, and you can manage to stay chilled for a while. But then house prices stop going up in N.Ireland and Scotland, and the national stats look somewhat "sluggish". There are growing demands for IRs to be lowered to a sensible level around 3.75%.

But Mervyn's had his triple-bypass and is in fine form. He doesn't want to help the housing market, he wants to target inflation. He isn't helped by the those Japs and Europeans putting up their IRs. Or oil at $90 a barrel. Or missile strikes against Iran.

Negative Equity hits the headlines. A few dappy families in West London. You're not that dumb. You bought in 2005, you'll be safe.

Unfortunately plenty of people also want to feel safe. They want to clear their credit cards, not take out more debt. So they stop spending so much.

And then it happens. You lose your job. You'll find another one though. Things will bounce back. But you're not sleeping so well at all now. Your guts feel tight most of the time. You are snappy with the kids. You argue with the wife a lot, and feel embarrassed that she's working and you're not. Then you remember that the fixed rate ends next month...

You wake up. It was a nightmare.

Phew!

You hadn't bought it in 2005 after all.

Had you?

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Just do it.

Go on, buy a house.

A really big one. With laminate flooring. And a garage.

Max out your credit card buying cheap tat from Ikea to make your place look nice.

When at Ikea make sure to get a folder to store all your "doommonger" clippings from the newspaper in. Get them out from time to time and chuckle.

Sit back in your Shangri-La, your bubble, and forget about the economy, how we might produce real wealth or add value. Take at face value all the stats we hear about low unemployment and growth. Don't dwell on the levels of debt, or rumours of inflation in the far-East. Why should that bother you are relaxing in your own home?

Watch house prices go up more. Congratulate yourself for buying now, when property is still affordable. Laugh at the doomsters who didn't buy in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, or 2007. See how house prices keep on rising! They can't be stopped!

But hang on - IRs are now 5.25%.

The market has slowed. High street banks and estate agents are trying to calm every one: the market is still OK, the market is still OK.

You try and relax, and you can manage to stay chilled for a while. But then house prices stop going up in N.Ireland and Scotland, and the national stats look somewhat "sluggish". There are growing demands for IRs to be lowered to a sensible level around 3.75%.

But Mervyn's had his triple-bypass and is in fine form. He doesn't want to help the housing market, he wants to target inflation. He isn't helped by the those Japs and Europeans putting up their IRs. Or oil at $90 a barrel. Or missile strikes against Iran.

Negative Equity hits the headlines. A few dappy families in West London. You're not that dumb. You bought in 2005, you'll be safe.

Unfortunately plenty of people also want to feel safe. They want to clear their credit cards, not take out more debt. So they stop spending so much.

And then it happens. You lose your job. You'll find another one though. Things will bounce back. But you're not sleeping so well at all now. Your guts feel tight most of the time. You are snappy with the kids. You argue with the wife a lot, and feel embarrassed that she's working and you're not. Then you remember that the fixed rate ends next month...

You wake up. It was a nightmare.

Phew!

You hadn't bought it in 2005 after all.

Had you?

that's a real toe-curler. You should get on some bull forums and do a spot of inverse trolling with that (as if we would ever sink to that level!)

ah yes, the sun is shining - I may be getting booted unceremoniously out of my lovely (but very temporary) rented accomodation next month, but at least I have a job, no debts and the freedom to plonk myself elsewhere at a time of my own choosing :)

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Guest mattsta1964

:D:D:D

The Hammer House of Horrors resurrected on tales of the UK housing Market

Starring Christoper Lee as Gordon Brown

Peter Cushing as 'The Mervsta'

Various c-listers as poor victims of unprecedented market crash

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According to some psychologists the thrill of losing money is more addictive than winning. This might explain the lemming like behaviour of those who have bought houses recently. The thought that they are going to lose sends those endomorphenes rushing around the brain to bring a sense of euphoria.

With depression rates up (recent surveys show 50% + of all women in the UK are on anti-depressants), alcoholism on the rise and a general sense of malaise and hopelessness in the face of spiralling inflation the will to self-destruct is very strong.

Buying a house at the top of the market is, in effect, the ultimate high and temporary fix for depression. Temporary being the operative word.

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With depression rates up (recent surveys show 50% + of all women in the UK are on anti-depressants)

what survey is this? Can I mouth off in an ill-informed fashion about this when drunk? Should I blame feminism? ;)

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what survey is this? Can I mouth off in an ill-informed fashion about this when drunk? Should I blame feminism? ;)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/medicine/story/0...1194465,00.html

Sunday April 18, 2004

The Observer

Death and taxes used to be the only certainties in life. For British women, we can now add another one: depression. Statistics may show that one in four women becomes depressed at some time,
but a magazine survey this week claims that more than half of British women have taken antidepressants.

:(

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Thats because they have realised they ve eaten 68g of fat instead of staying below 60g of polunsaturated fat. Least of all daily diet has exceeded max intake by 126 calories. And they feel ugly today. Are my boobs small?

OMFG Who wouldnt be f-ing depressed?!

Edited by notanewmember

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/medicine/story/0...1194465,00.html

Sunday April 18, 2004

The Observer

Death and taxes used to be the only certainties in life. For British women, we can now add another one: depression. Statistics may show that one in four women becomes depressed at some time,
but a magazine survey this week claims that more than half of British women have taken antidepressants.

:(

Realistbear, how do you make the leap from this

but a magazine survey this week claims that more than half of British women have taken antidepressants

to this?

With depression rates up (recent surveys show 50% + of all women in the UK are on anti-depressants), alcoholism on the rise and a general sense of malaise and hopelessness in the face of spiralling inflation the will to self-destruct is very strong.

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Realistbear, how do you make the leap from this

to this?

If you haven't yet realised, Realistbear does not follow logic as most sane educated people do but rather has his own way of drawing false conclusions starting from a few random press clippings and going via general hand-waving.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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