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bearwithaconscience

Sutton/kingston/croydon, Surrey

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Damn, after 5 years of stagnation, they seem to be off again. :o Most houses on the internet seem to be under offer, and asking prices seem to have taken a leap. Why? Can't be city bonuses this far out can it?

Anyone else live round here?

yeap and you right !!!!!!!!

just bought a flat in surbiton, and things are selling fast........

lot of demand especially from BTL's , lot's of proff couples/singles. Good rail links, and town centre

road links are good as well, so overhall it's a good area. :P

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Damn, after 5 years of stagnation, they seem to be off again. :o Most houses on the internet seem to be under offer, and asking prices seem to have taken a leap. Why? Can't be city bonuses this far out can it?

Anyone else live round here?

Don't know anything about the Croydon/Sutton market, but Kingston is a bit up and down. In the better parts of Kingston and Surbiton decent properties are still selling quickly for inflated prices. There is a lot of stuff in the less sought after parts which is sticking, even though the prices seem fairly reasonable. It has been like this for most of 2006.

I don't think city bonuses effect this market too much. In Kingston, there is the Coombe estate, and perhaps 10-15 other roads where the average price is £1m+, in Sutton and Croydon there are probably less still. The bonus effect may go out as far as Richmond at a push.

Prices are more driven by the general London market. As people are priced out of Wimbledon/Clapham etc they come to Kingston looking for cheaper properties. Those priced out of Kingston may go out to Sutton and Croydon.

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Solicitor yesterday tole me his mum has tried to sell her Chertsea home for 3 YEARS!!!

Originally marketed at £600k, exchanging at £440k.

Don't tell me the market is hot.

fp

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I'm afraid I can concur with realistbear.

After a period of inactivity, houses in Kingston and New malden are now selling like mad again.

I have seen a house in New Malden which was on the market last year, and has gone back on sale for £90K higher..

People like us who are renting have really lost out as we sold when the market was dead last year and and now are stuck renting with a huge price increases still going on.

I have noticed that most of the people predicting a HPC on this board are from areas outside the SE and have no idea of what the market is doing here in areas like SW London.

It also looks like they have been registered for some time and have been predicting a HPC which still looks unlikely.

My wife is fed up of renting and I just want to start living our lives in our own place...

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I'm afraid I can concur with realistbear.

After a period of inactivity, houses in Kingston and New malden are now selling like mad again.

I have seen a house in New Malden which was on the market last year, and has gone back on sale for £90K higher..

People like us who are renting have really lost out as we sold when the market was dead last year and and now are stuck renting with a huge price increases still going on.

I have noticed that most of the people predicting a HPC on this board are from areas outside the SE and have no idea of what the market is doing here in areas like SW London.

It also looks like they have been registered for some time and have been predicting a HPC which still looks unlikely.

My wife is fed up of renting and I just want to start living our lives in our own place...

i with you all the way

i was renting as well then i got fed up, and jumped back in.

i would love a larger place !!!! but prices are higher here

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I think people priced out of Kingston have got as far as new malden/worcester park. The differential between Kingston and Sutton has grown a lot in the last 6 yrs since I moved here. I work in Kingston and have been trying to contemplate moving across for ages to get rid of the nightmare commute.

This latest boom did take me by surprise. It has been sluggish to falling for about 2 years, but my guess is that asking prices are up about 10-20% on this time last year. I think affordability is historically low for this area, but still cheap compared to most of London. With more and more well paid jobs all the time in London, I am starting to worry that there is no way down for prices. They might wobble but not crash.

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Interesting to note that there has been no reply from any of the posters who have been predicting a HPC.

I can't believe the actual size of the bounce since last year, and I am feeling more and more anguished every day as we are trying for another child and we need to have our own place before the end of the year.

All these posts from desparados about the BOJ raising interests rates, or a possible recession in the US of A impacting house prices here are just wishful thinking.. and I can't see that happening...

Until UK Interest rates go up by a good few pence, then the high house prices are here to stay.. especially in the South East

Like I said, people would give and an arm and leg to move to parts of SW London because of the quality of life and good schools.

I only wish I hadn't been taken in by the HPC brigade last year.....

There are VI on both sides of the equation...

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I personally think that the problem is that the bears on HPC are not wrong, but the British public is in a frenzy of madness over the housing market. I honestly think prices could carry on going up and probably double what they are now in places like London. There are so many wealthy people here, and already most areas have been unaffordable for 5/6 yrs. As well as the general boom, there is a polarisation going on between desirable and non-desirable areas. I think this is what we are seeing in SW London.

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I personally think that the problem is that the bears on HPC are not wrong, but the British public is in a frenzy of madness over the housing market. I honestly think prices could carry on going up and probably double what they are now in places like London. There are so many wealthy people here, and already most areas have been unaffordable for 5/6 yrs. As well as the general boom, there is a polarisation going on between desirable and non-desirable areas. I think this is what we are seeing in SW London.

i keep thinking to the 87-88-89 and early 90's , when we were all told of the same things, and in the END, the they were all proved wrong, so it does make me wonder that , " if we keep on saying it enough, it will happen" although i took a personal approch and had to jump in and take the gamble, as i need somewhere to live........ and it is a long term, so which ever way the market falls, i'm not renting anymore, and i have HOME....

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i keep thinking to the 87-88-89 and early 90's , when we were all told of the same things, and in the END, the they were all proved wrong, so it does make me wonder that , " if we keep on saying it enough, it will happen" although i took a personal approch and had to jump in and take the gamble, as i need somewhere to live........ and it is a long term, so which ever way the market falls, i'm not renting anymore, and i have HOME....

I bought 5 years ago. We were priced out of movement within 6 months of moving in and to be honest, prices didn't really rise from that point till now. They did a little during 2001, but since then it seems to have been fairly static. I don't want to stay round here long term any more. My workplace is like a kindergarten/old people's home. There is no-one there between the ages of 30 and 55. Either they bought before the eighties boom or they are twenty something renters. Everyone else has gone. No-one cares - the govt have seriously muffed it up in places like this, but it doesn't really matter at the end of the day. The world still turns....

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Interesting to note that there has been no reply from any of the posters who have been predicting a HPC.

All these posts from desparados about the BOJ raising interests rates, or a possible recession in the US of A impacting house prices here are just wishful thinking.. and I can't see that happening...

Until UK Interest rates go up by a good few pence, then the high house prices are here to stay.. especially in the South East

I only wish I hadn't been taken in by the HPC brigade last year.....

There are VI on both sides of the equation...

Sour grapes. Always DYOR which I have and as a result am content not to buy at present. Stop capitulating.

i keep thinking to the 87-88-89 and early 90's , when we were all told of the same things, and in the END, the they were all proved wrong, so it does make me wonder that , " if we keep on saying it enough, it will happen" although i took a personal approch and had to jump in and take the gamble, as i need somewhere to live........ and it is a long term, so which ever way the market falls, i'm not renting anymore, and i have HOME....

It is a home but will you be happy in a few years to have paid 30%+ too much if HP's fall and still have to pay back the extra with compound interest on top? If you answer, "yes" then you made the right choice for you. I'll spare you the calculations as it may change your decision.

Edited by Buffer Bear

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I'd say we are on the last or thereabouts move upwards (sucker move) where many of those who have been holding out for a crash for so long can't bear it any longer and jump right in at the top or very close to it (it's classic).

The fundamentals are relatively shortly going to tip the market over the precipice for a large long-term correction.

That "home" won't seem so wonderful when you have 30/40%+ negative equity for loads of years, trust me.

Best to all.

B)

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I'd say we are on the last or thereabouts move upwards (sucker move) where many of those who have been holding out for a crash for so long can't bear it any longer and jump right in at the top or very close to it (it's classic).

The fundamentals are relatively shortly going to tip the market over the precipice for a large long-term correction.

That "home" won't seem so wonderful when you have 30/40%+ negative equity for loads of years, trust me.

Best to all.

B)

FUNNY THAT !!!!!!

I think i heard that in 2002-3-4-5 and early his year, for those of who listened, to that type of talk we have lost out ALOT....

and i don't think there is ever a right time to jump in or out especially if you intend to live in there, and if you're happy and can afford the mortage, is it really going to matter that much.........and also ref to negative equity, well i lived through it , and YES IT WAS VERY PAINFUL, but the flip side to that is what goes up will always go DOWN !!!! and visa versa, and it's all a waiting game, lets get back to the subject of what are prices doing in the KINGSTON SURBITON AND SURRONDING AREA'S PLEASE........

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Maxi,

If you were following people who were telling you that prices would crash during 2002-2005 then more fool you, the market will lag the predictions many times, doesnt mean they are wrong just that the crucial and hardest part 'timing' is off. Look at the 'predictions' page they don't predict 2002-2005 so I'm not sure who you were listening to. :rolleyes:http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/#predictions

Of course there are better times to jump into the market than others, for a start when there is a 30/40/50%+ correction then you will be able to get a far better spec property for your bucks than the place you out of desperation and poor purchasing power buy at the top end of the market because you can't afford anything better. Don't tell me that the majority of people can find the place they are really happy with at these top end prices. :P that's just wishful thinking.

Well you may have lived through negative equity previously and if you havent learnt your lesson, you will be doing it again it seems with a vengeance, good luck. ;)

:D

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Maxi,

If you were following people who were telling you that prices would crash during 2002-2005 then more fool you, the market will lag the predictions many times, doesnt mean they are wrong just that the crucial and hardest part 'timing' is off. Look at the 'predictions' page they don't predict 2002-2005 so I'm not sure who you were listening to. :rolleyes:http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/#predictions

Of course there are better times to jump into the market than others, for a start when there is a 30/40/50%+ correction then you will be able to get a far better spec property for your bucks than the place you out of desperation and poor purchasing power buy at the top end of the market because you can't afford anything better. Don't tell me that the majority of people can find the place they are really happy with at these top end prices. :P that's just wishful thinking.

Well you may have lived through negative equity previously and if you havent learnt your lesson, you will be doing it again it seems with a vengeance, good luck. ;)

:D

all i can say AGAIN is if the crash was coming, and we all keep saying it, and as you point out that it's all to do with "TIMING"

:lol: well if you can tell us all your version and the " TIMING " and when to jump in or out i shall gladly LISTEN your ole wise words...... :rolleyes: ref to buying better houses with a lot less money well tell us something new !!!!!!

going back to equity i hope it does'nt bite me or the vast majority of people AGAIN, but if it does... i'll put it down to my fault, not anyone else and thank you for your concern ;) but in the end i do know from last time that it was all to do with TIMING :(

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Not my version Maxi, its fairly obvious if you get your head out of the sand.

Buying a property this year is buying at the top of the market or thereabouts. You will have probably 4-7 years ahead to hold on to a "home"/dead-weight that is going to lose considerable value over that period before it starts to move up to these levels again. Worth it, not for many people.

Now is the time to be building your capital up for the time over the next few years when you can find the property you really want at much lower prices.

This is the "sucker move" presently, drawing in the desperate, sheep-like, ignorant and plain unlucky as always happens at the top of a market.

Edited by CrashDive

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:( well i guess we all have our opinions, and i hope you're wrong , for my sake and alot of others who have been SUCKERED

into this desperate move, cause there was no saving to made by renting around this area for me anyways, i needed somewhere to live, and i got fed up of waiting and listening to the doom and it will HAPPEN merchants, and hence have jumped in with both feet, and HAPPY :P tht i 'm paying a mortage rather than renting, so if youre renting maybe your head is in the sand :blink: and do some maths ........YOU MIGHT BE SUPRISED !!!!!! that 1+1 does equal = 2 ;):D

By the way read this......whether it is a false reading or not i don't know but http://business.timesonline.co.uk/article/...p;attr=Business

it makes me feel better , as i don't see any people giving links to the DOWNSIDE ......... LOL

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it makes me feel better , as i don't see any people giving links to the DOWNSIDE ......... LOL

Making a financial/investment decision because it "makes me feel better" is why so many people get suckered in to poor decisions. In any market you have a bulk of players who just want to feel they belong which makes them comfortable, they make up the mass of sheep going along with the others, the housing market is no different.

If there are no links to the "downside" then that is a big indicator that we are near the top of the market, as when everybody believes we are going higher thats when quick deep/downside moves happen, they feed upon the panic and disbelief of those optimists caught out.. There are "downside" links anyway of course but may will choose to ignore as long as they can because it is more comfortable that way.

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The problem in this area is that prices have not risen significantly since about 2002. This means that affordability, although fairly stretched, has improved compared to most parts of Central London. I have been wondering for years whether the sheer numbers of flats being built in Central London will have an impact here. If you own a riverside flat which you bought pre-boom, you could be sat on hundreds of thousands of equity. Outlying suburbs/towns like Kingston/St Albans would be a perfect place where you can now buy a house with the proceeds of your flat. There are good schools for people moving out with children or wanting to have children.

I am worried that the "zone of affordability" is moving outwards. There are just too many people with a lot of equity in London. Besides, people have been worrying about affordability here for about 20 years, and it has almost been assimilated into people's expectations.

Long term, I can imagine Kingston outperforming the market as a whole, because people want to live there. It has improved in the last 6 years beyond recognition. It now looks like places like Richmond used to, in terms of shops, restaurants etc.

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The problem in this area is that prices have not risen significantly since about 2002. This means that affordability, although fairly stretched, has improved compared to most parts of Central London. I have been wondering for years whether the sheer numbers of flats being built in Central London will have an impact here. If you own a riverside flat which you bought pre-boom, you could be sat on hundreds of thousands of equity. Outlying suburbs/towns like Kingston/St Albans would be a perfect place where you can now buy a house with the proceeds of your flat. There are good schools for people moving out with children or wanting to have children.

I am worried that the "zone of affordability" is moving outwards. There are just too many people with a lot of equity in London. Besides, people have been worrying about affordability here for about 20 years, and it has almost been assimilated into people's expectations.

Long term, I can imagine Kingston outperforming the market as a whole, because people want to live there. It has improved in the last 6 years beyond recognition. It now looks like places like Richmond used to, in terms of shops, restaurants etc.

I have lived in the Kingston area for quite a few years. I agree that it has improved in that time, altough there have been some downsides as well (the proliferation of poor nightclubs making certain parts of the town centre unpleasant at night, for example).

The main change that I have noticed is the movement in the demographic of the area. The only significant new build in the last 5 years has been flats, and there have been plenty of conversions as well.

This has had the dual effect of attracting more young people into the area, and driving prices of 'real' houses through the roof.

You can pick up a reasonable house for a 'normal' price in the outlying parts, but the sought after areas have risen much faster than flats. In the part of Surbiton where I live, you can pick up a large, 2 bed flat with garden for about £275k, wheras a 3 bed semi with perhaps 25% more floorspace is £500k+!

This has created a schism between the prices of houses and flats. If you compare the best parts of Kingston/Surbiton to Guildford, for example, flats are about 10% more expensive, houses about 25%. Traditionally, this would have been the other way around, but the lack of supply has made houses artifically expensive.

Over the last few years, I have noticed a lot of people 'cashing-in' on equity they have in flats in more central areas to buy houses in the better parts of Kingston/Surbiton. Now, I think they will start looking further out in the commuter belt to get better value.

I think that the main activity in the area will be flat-buying FTB's priced out of areas closer to London. Kingston represents relatively good value in this part of the market.

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"most Britons think their area will beat the market"

"In a list of the top five factors explaining their optimism the notion that their area is special dominates home owners' perceptions. Not only do people believe their area is up and coming relative to other areas but also that it is a honey pot for property investors. The belief that investors will propel prices upwards is rated second. Next on the list is the expectation that more and more people want to move to their area, thus pushing up demand and naturally, house prices. A shortage of second-hand homes on the market comes fourth.

Wider economic factors attract much lower priority, even though they are the key determinant of the overall health of the housing market - only the fact mortgages are affordable makes it into the top 5."

'People see their own area through rose tinted spectacles, favouring it above similar areas nearby. In every town in the UK, local rivalries foment.

However, the notion that an area is up and coming is a relative one: if some areas are doing better than average, others must be doing worse. Prices can't beat the market everywhere! People mistake general improvements brought about by economic growth and a healthy housing market for special local factors favouring their district.

What's more, their belief that an army of property investors is snapping up every available home in their area to make a killing is clearly illogical. Just 10-15% of buyers are investors while the overwhelming majority are owner-occupiers.

This is just an extension of age-old house pride. People are emotionally attached to the area they live and highly territorial about its merits. And of course, no-one wants to think they've bought in the wrong place!'

http://firstrung.co.uk/articles.asp?pageid...&cat=44-0-0

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Hi

I want to give you our experiance, we had a three bed semi house up for sale last febuary 2005 in Chessington Surrey, it took us till january 2006 to get an offer on it, it was alovely house, nothing inside needed doing much to it, big rooms, large garden, it was intailly valued at £325.00K, which we was suprised at, we thought it was a bit over the top, but EA assured us that is what its worth, after being on the market for that long, we decided to reduce it by 35K, but because it had been on the market for that long, the buyers must had thought there was something wrong with it, the sale was very slow still, we did eventually sell it in January this year (the sale took ages and ages to go through, thats another story) at £294.00K, after since moved out, we have seen 2 others sold in same street, fews doors away for over £300K :o , same condition and size as ours was, begger belief, I even rand our old EA and chatted with him about it, he tells us its the vendors that our putting their own price on,, Unbelivable that is a period of 3 months prices are going up in my old street yet again...... see for yourself here this sold at this price http://www.findaproperty.com/agent.aspx?ag...&pid=549809, dont have a link to my old house sale, they took it off now, but that house was almost identical to my old one.

Another example of the looney prices happening in Chessington Surrey, friends of ours sold their house a 2bed terreace for £172K in late febraury 2006, someone has gone in, put in a new cheap kitchen and cheap batheroom, and paved the drive, and painetd it out, and cheap new carpets everywhere, how i know because my friends who moved out of the area asked if i would go and view it just to see what they had done, they missed thier old house!! dont ask me why... anyway i did view, and its just had a rushed make over job done to it, nothing special really, yet its back on the market for £40 K more!!!! and see here the property http://www.findaproperty.com/agent.aspx?ag...p;photo=1#photo

How can they ask that much more for a tin of paint job, cheap kitchen and bathroom, well some of th bathroom was done, etc, and few months later its back on for £40K more, madness, just to prove what they sold at, look here at no 37 (hpe that link works) http://www.nethouseprices.com/index.php?co...rthingToSearch=

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A property went up for sale near us a couple of weeks ago in South Kingston/Norbiton. It's a 2/3 bed place, pretty small. They usually go for about £250,000, it was on the market for £300,000. I thought they were having a bit of a laugh and wouldn't have any luck selling the place. A week later and the place is SSC. So it looks like prices are going a bit insane round these parts.

http://www.gibsonlane.co.uk/detailslin.htm

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A property went up for sale near us a couple of weeks ago in South Kingston/Norbiton. It's a 2/3 bed place, pretty small. They usually go for about £250,000, it was on the market for £300,000. I thought they were having a bit of a laugh and wouldn't have any luck selling the place. A week later and the place is SSC. So it looks like prices are going a bit insane round these parts.

http://www.gibsonlane.co.uk/detailslin.htm

Laughable , i know Kingston well enough but this is just taking the p**s to the extreme , who are these fools , IF it sells so quickly ,there probably paying pretty much full asking price , so therefore a nice 12 large in stamp duty , mortgage fees , solicitors , searches etc etc , but i wonder if there hire a transit , just to save a few quid on the removals , almost certain these saps have financially written there lives off .

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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