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Unaffordable Housing

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Its definitely all the planners fault!

What shocks me these days is that local authority planners in London are classified as 'key workers' and qualify for subsidised shared ownership housing/social rented schemes?? Apparently virtually all the planners in most inner London boroughs for example are Kiwis, Aussies and Saffas as they can't recruit any home grown talent! Given that the HPI is their fault they shouldn't then be rewarded by getting subsidised housing. :)

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read the first few pages and then the rest on the train home last night.

cant stress enough that nearly everyone on this site should read ALL of the report. it has some amazing studies on rural england and how we are all being told lies about the amount of space we have and the effects on rural areas. explains what will happen in an ever increasing market and the basic fundmenatls of why its increased. basically, the longer it keeps increasing the more volatile it becomes.

either planning laws are relaxed or england will become (is) the laughing stock of europe. we now have the worst value housing in europe and due to higher rents and unaffordable housing, business is slowly being drained away. all the lies about england being an island so we have no room is a crock of sh1t. only 5% of land has been used. holland and belgium dont have the problems we do ? germany has the same density population but houses are 50% bigger !

london is now at threat from paris and frankfurt and in future could no longer be the financial capital. with such strict planning laws and higher commercial/residential prices, this will be a big contribution to the downfall of a british economy. even the bulls should be worried, higher prices only benefit the elderly and middle age, it will destroy future generations and the economy. which anybody knows, IS not the way forward.

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london is now at threat from paris and frankfurt and in future could no longer be the financial capital. with such strict planning laws and higher commercial/residential prices, this will be a big contribution to the downfall of a british economy. even the bulls should be worried, higher prices only benefit the elderly and middle age, it will destroy future generations and the economy. which anybody knows, IS not the way forward

I can't see London being a long term success anyway. Surely the easier it gets to work away from the office the more people especially rich people in well paid jobs will head for the sun, sea, low density attractive destinations. Give it 100 years and london will be the new bombay without the heat.

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you can download this 40 odd page report ' Unaffordable Housing' that is well worth a read

http://www.policyexchange.org.uk/Publications.aspx?page=1

Enjoy, i like this bit

'Planners have created a system that has led not only to higher house prices but also a highly volatile housing market'

Just a few points;

This is damning property in England for a number of reasons against our european counterparts, not al valid IMO.

Less rooms per house in England, family size is dwindling, surely this is a marketable proposition.

Room size is less in England, europe tend to paint walls & have laminate floors.

We wallpaper & carpet, also heating, the larger rooms seem to be in warmer climes, duh!

Affordable homes need to have low maintenance also.

It also gives travel times for commuting, enough folk on this forum complain that work & home should be next door to each other to preserve family life etc. goes against the argument for green belt build somewhat.

The number of vacant dwellings is very low, sort of blowing the evil BTL/second home fable out of the water.

Maybe I live in a priveledged area but the majority of the builds round here are 3 storey at the most, & there are virtual complete villages being built on previous farm land, no high rises at all.

Forgive my ignorance, are there still high rise blocks being built in England?

I see a lot in spain.

Interesting download, thanks.

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with such strict planning laws and higher commercial/residential prices, this will be a big contribution to the downfall of a british economy. even the bulls should be worried, higher prices only benefit the elderly and middle age, it will destroy future generations and the economy. which anybody knows, IS not the way forward.

Good comment. On Saturday I read the first story I have seen that acknowledges a link between foreign investment in the UK and house prices. An article about Indian call centres in the Guardian ends with the comment:

"ICICI OneSource, a Mumbai-based outsourcing company, said it was building a new 1,000-person call centre in Belfast. ICICI said it was attracted to Northern Ireland because of its highly skilled workforce and relatively cheap property prices."

The message is clear: high house prices are an impediment to inward investment in England.

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Apparently virtually all the planners in most inner London boroughs for example are Kiwis, Aussies and Saffas as they can't recruit any home grown talent!

Out of interest, where did you hear this?

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you can download this 40 odd page report ' Unaffordable Housing' that is well worth a read

http://www.policyexchange.org.uk/Publications.aspx?page=1

Enjoy, i like this bit

'Planners have created a system that has led not only to higher house prices but also a highly volatile housing market'

This is brilliant. Everything that I've been saying, particualary with respect to nearly 50% of new builds now flats. Squeezing houses into the remaining spaces in towns/cities whilst on the edges of the towns/cities the building stops due to NIMBY pressures on planning.

This is not a civilised society when those of us that want to have families can't afford family-sized homes but those of us that don't have dependant families own all the family housing stock and are even able to buy more than 1 family-sized home

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this really hits the spot in terms of what is happening in the UK;

So the current position is that what people want, when

asked, is lower density housing. What they get, what the

planning system now insists upon, is high density development,

much of it in the least desired form – blocks of flats.

Thirty or forty years ago, when much housing was

provided by local authorities, large numbers of tower blocks

were built in and around Britain’s towns and cities in order

to save on land. They too were not what people wanted, but

when their houses were demolished this was the subsidised

accommodation that was provided to them. Only when one

of the towers collapsed was it accepted that people’s preferences

had to be taken into account. Now the same cycle is

being repeated. True, fewer tower blocks are being built, but

high density developments are now being put up with even

less garden or ‘amenity space’ than was provided around the

tower blocks. Once again, people are being forced to live in

arid urban developments because that is what ‘those who

know best’ think they ought to.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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